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Encyclopedia > Seattle University

Seattle University

Motto Connecting the mind to what matters.
Established 1891
Type Private, Jesuit
Endowment $157 Million[1]
President Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.
Faculty 609
Undergraduates 4,160
Postgraduates 1,963
Location Seattle, Washington, United States
Campus Urban, 48 acres
Conference Great Northwest Athletic Conference
Mascot Redhawks
Website http://www.seattleu.edu/
Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. From left to right in the background are Garrand Hall (School of Nursing), the Administration Building, and Piggot Hall (Albers School of Business).
Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. From left to right in the background are Garrand Hall (School of Nursing), the Administration Building, and Piggot Hall (Albers School of Business).
Interior, Chapel of St. Ignatius. Architect: Steven Holl.
Interior, Chapel of St. Ignatius. Architect: Steven Holl.

Seattle University is a Jesuit Catholic university in the United States. Located on Seattle, Washington's First Hill, it was founded in 1891 as the School of the Immaculate Conception by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), and continues to operate as a Jesuit institution. Today, Seattle University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. U.S. News and World Report's "Best Colleges 2007" ranks Seattle University among the top 10 schools in the West that offer a full range of masters and undergraduate programs. Image File history File links SeattleUSeal. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... The Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northwestern United States. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... George Tsutakawa (1910-1997), sculptor and painter was born in Seattle, Washington. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 720 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Seattle University Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 720 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Seattle University Metadata... Steven Holls design for Simmons Hall of MIT won the Harleston Parker Medal in 2004. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Nickname: Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2 1869 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Greg Nickels (NP) Area  - City  142. ... First Hill is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, named for the hill on which it is located. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

History

Seattle University was founded by Father Victor Garrand and Father Adrian Sweere in downtown Seattle, and has served as both a high school and college. In 1893, construction started on the First Hill campus. The school moved to First Hill in 1898 and changed its name to Seattle College, at which point the high school became a separate institution now known as Seattle Preparatory School. In 1909, the college awarded its first bachelor's degrees. In 1931, Seattle College became the first Jesuit university in the country to admit female students. Downtown Seattle, from top of Space Needle (looking south) Map of downtown Seattle Downtown is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Seattle Preps St. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A bachelors degree (Artium Baccalaureus, A.B. or B.A.) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At one time, the Jesuits planned to move the college to the tract of land that is now the heart of Seattle's Wedgwood neighborhood, but by 1940 they decided against the move, and sold the land in 1940.[2] Seattle College changed its name to Seattle University in 1948. Wedgwood Wedgwood is a neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, located about two miles (3 km) north, and slightly east, of the University of Washington; it is about 6 miles (10 km) northeast of downtown. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


Programs

Seattle University offers 44 bachelor's degree programs and 24 graduate degree programs, plus a law school and a doctoral program in education. The university consists of eight colleges: the College of Arts and Sciences, the Albers School of Business and Economics, the College of Education, the School of Law, Matteo Ricci College, the College of Nursing, the College of Science and Engineering, and the School of Theology and Ministry. A Seattle University education is estimated to cost $150,000, although much of this is covered by financial aid. [3] Matteo Ricci College, part of Seattle, Washingtons Seattle University, allows students from Seattle Preparatory School and select other area high schools to graduate with a bachelors degree in humanities or teaching after as little as three years in high school and three years in college. ...


Seattle University's Albers School of Business and Economics, started in 1945, was named after the Albers family. George and Eva Albers were generous donors to the university. Their daughter, Genevieve Albers, attended SU and continued the family's legacy of generosity to the school; she also sponsored a business forum, established an eponymous professorship, and donated funds to create scholarships. In 1967, the business school added an MBA program, which is now the largest nationally accredited, evening program for working professionals in the Pacific Northwest. The part-time MBA Program is recognized among the Top 25 by "U.S. News & World Report's 2007 America's Best Graduate Schools". US News also ranks the Albers School among the top 10% of undergraduate business schools nationwide. The Albers School is accredited with the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business AACSB. The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


The School of Law was founded in 1972 as part of the University of Puget Sound (UPS) in Tacoma, Wash. Twenty-one years later, UPS and SU agreed on a transfer of the law school to Seattle University; in August 1994 the transfer was completed, and the school physically moved to the SU campus in 1999. The 2007 US News and World Report Law School rankings list the School of Law in the top 100 Law Schools in the nation. Also, the School of Law is home to the number two Legal Writing program in the nation. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Puget Sound (often called UPS or just Puget Sound) is a private liberal arts college located in the North End of Tacoma, Washington, in the United States. ... Nickname: The City of Destiny Location of Tacoma in Pierce County and Washington State County Pierce Mayor Bill Baarsma (NP) Area    - City 162. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the College of Arts and Sciences, Seattle University's graduate program in psychology is notable as one of the few schools in the country to focus on Existential Phenomenology as a therapeutic method. The school also offers a mainstream program in counseling.


Service-learning and social justice are important components of the educational experience at Seattle University, which strives to "empower leaders for the common good." Each year students, faculty and staff commit hundreds of hours to service projects and community outreach through the Center for Service and Community Engagement.


The university is increasingly attracting and retaining a diverse student population. Since 1995, the number of underrepresented minority students – Native American, Hispanic and black – has nearly doubled from 441 in 1995 to 856 at the start of the 2006-07 academic year. More than one-third of the overall student body represent diverse groups.


The campus includes numerous works by well-known artists (including the Centennial Fountain by Seattle artist George Tsutakawa[4]—recipient of an honorary doctorate from Seattle U.[5]—and a large glass sculpture in the PACCAR Atrium of Piggot Hall by Tacoma, Washington artist Dale Chihuly,[6] as well as works by Chuck Close, Jacob Lawrence, Gwendolyn Knight, William Morris and David Mach[6]) and several architecturally notable buildings. Of the latter, probably the most famous is the Chapel of St. Ignatius, designed by New York architect Steven Holl, born in Bremerton, Washington: the 1997 building won a national Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in 1998.[7] George Tsutakawa (1910-1997), sculptor and painter was born in Seattle, Washington. ... Nickname: Location of Tacoma in Pierce County and Washington State Coordinates: , Country United States of America State Washington County Pierce Government  - Mayor Bill Baarsma (D) Area  - City 62. ... Dale Chihuly. ... Chuck Close (born Charles Thomas Close July 5, 1940, Monroe, Wisconsin) is an American photorealistic painter and photographer. ... Jacob Lawrence taken by Kenneth Space. ... April 20 Gwendolyn Knight On this date we celebrate the birth of Gwendolyn Knight in 1913. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris (March 24, 1834 – October 3, 1896) was an English artist, writer, socialist and activist. ... David Mach (born 18 March 1956) is a Scottish sculptor and installation artist. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Steven Holls design for Simmons Hall of MIT won the Harleston Parker Medal in 2004. ... Sinclair Inlet and Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (left), Dyes Inlet (middle distance) and Manette and Warren Avenue Bridges (left to right) across Port Washington Narrows Bremerton is a city in Kitsap County, Washington, USA. The population was 37,259 at the 2000 census. ... The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ...


Sports

The university's sports teams are the Redhawks, and participate in the NCAA's Great Northwest Athletic Conference. The athletics program at SU has produced top-notch athletes both on and off the field. The men's soccer program won the 2004 NCAA Division II Championship, and the university's swim program has produced many All-American swimmers. Seattle University was also a member of the Division 1 West Coast Conference (WCC), at that time the West Coast Athletic Conference, from 1971-1980. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northwestern United States. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ...


Between 1953 and 1969 the Seattle University basketball team, then known as the Chieftains, reached the NCAA Division I Tournament 11 times. The 1958 team, lead by Elgin Baylor, advanced to the NCAA championship game, where they lost to Kentucky 84-72. // Final four redirects here. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ...


On March 7, 2007, President Father Steven V. Sundborg sent a campus-wide e-mail explaining that the West Coast Conference of the NCAA Division I would not be expanding now or in the foreseeable future. Father Sundborg left the door open to more campus discussion, but Seattle University remains a Division II team in the GNAC.


On May 11, 2007, despite the West Coast Conference recent decision to not expand, the Seattle University board of trustees gave its approval anyway to apply for Division I status. If the move is approved by the NCAA, Seattle University could transition to a mixed Division I and II schedule in 2008-09 and could be Division I in all sports as early as 2009-10.


Notable alumni and attendees

  • Mohamed Ali Alabbar (1981) - Chairman of Emaar Properties; One of the world's largest real estate development firms with $25 billion in assets.
  • Elgin Baylor - NBA Hall of Famer; general manager, Los Angeles Clippers, 2006 NBA Executive of the Year.
  • Major General (Ret.) Patrick Henry Brady - recipient of the Medal of Honor
  • Gary Brinson (1966) - founder and retired chair of Brinson Partners; GP Brinson Investments; The Brinson Foundation. The January 2003 issue of CFA Magazine named Brinson as one of seven living legends in the investment profession.
  • Major General Peter Chiarelli (1972) - Director of Operations, U.S. Army, commander of forces in Iraq
  • Jeffrey Flowers (1965) - President, Marco Polo Hotel Group
  • William P. Foley, II (1970, M.B.A.) - Chairman and CEO, Fidelity National Financial
  • Mary Kay Fualaau (formerly Mary Kay Letourneau) (1989) - A former schoolteacher convicted for having a sexual relationship with her underage student.
  • Micheal Gilleran (1971; J.D. 1975) - Commissioner of the West Coast Conference
  • Ray Heacox (1976) - President and General Manager of KING-TV, KONG-TV and NorthWest Cable News
  • John E. Hopcroft (1961)- renowned theoretical computer scientist; co-winner 1986 Turing Award
  • Richard Jones (1972) - Judge; King County Superior Court that sentenced Gary Ridgeway, "The Green River Killer"
  • Carolyn Kelly (M.B.A.) - President and COO, The Seattle Times
  • Robert Kruse (1995, M.B.A.) - Founder & President of VenLogic LLC
  • Steve McConnell (1991, M.S. Software Engineering) - Chair of the IEEE Computer Society's Professional Practices Committee
  • Duff McKagan - Bassist of Velvet Revolver, ex-bassist of Guns N' Roses
  • Stan W. McNaughton (1974) - CEO, PEMCO Insurance
  • Charles Mitchell (1974) - Chancellor, Seattle Community Colleges; was president of Seattle Central Community College in 2001 when Time magazine named it “College of the Year.” Former professional football player with the Denver Broncos and Buffalo Bills.
  • Frank Murkowski (1955) - Former Governor of Alaska and former U.S. Senator from Alaska
  • Carol Nelson (1974; 1984, MBA) - President, CEO, Cascade Bank
  • Dino Rossi (1982) - Former Washington State Senator and Republican nominee for Governor of Washington
  • John D. Spellman (1949) - Former Governor of Washington state.
  • Lieutenant Commander Charles Swift (J.D.; 1994) - served as legal council for Salim Ahmed Hamdan. Listed as 100 most influential lawyers in the US.
  • Jim Whittaker (1952) - First American to summit Mount Everest in 1963.
  • Will Espero (1982) - Hawaii State Senator

Emaar Properties (Arabic: إعمار), the Dubai-based Public Joint Stock Company and one of the world’s largest real estate companies, is listed on the Dubai Financial Market and is part of the Dow Jones Arabia Titans Index. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Patrick Henry Brady, (Born 1 October 1936 in Philip, SD), was a U.S. Army helicopter pilot who earned the United States highest military decoration; the Medal of Honor and a retired Major General. ... Fidelity National Financial Incorporated (FNF) , headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, USA (formerly in Santa Barbara, CA, is a Fortune 500 company. ... Letourneaus photo from the Washington State Sex Offender Information Center, taken upon her release from prison, August 4, 2004. ... Mary Kay Letourneau on her release from jail, January 6, 1998. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... John Hopcroft John E. Hopcroft (born October 7, 1939) is a renowned theoretical computer scientist. ... Gary Leon Ridgway (born February 18, 1949 in Salt Lake City, Utah), known as the Green River Killer, is one of the most prolific serial killers in American history. ... The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... Steven Steve C. McConnell is a well-known author of many software engineering textbooks, including: Code Complete editions 1 (1993) & 2 (2004) ISBN 0735619670 Rapid Development (1996) ISBN 0072850604 Software Project Survival Guide (1998) ISBN 1572316217 After the Gold Rush (1999) ISBN 0735608776 Professional Software Development (2004) ISBN 0321193679 His... Software engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. ... An organizational unit of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), established in 1963 when the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) and the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE) merged to create the IEEE. At the time of the merger, the AIEE’s Subcommittee on Large-Scale Computing... Duff Rose McKagan (born Michael Andrew McKagan on February 5, 1964) is an American musician and bassist, who is best known for his thirteen-year tenure in the 1980s hard rock band Guns N Roses. ... The Seattle Community College District is a group of community colleges located in Seattle, Washington. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... City Denver, Colorado Other nicknames Orange Crush (1977-1979 defense) Team colors Orange, Broncos Navy Blue, and White[1] Head Coach Mike Shanahan Owner Pat Bowlen General manager Ted Sundquist Mascot Miles League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Navy blue, light blue, Red, light Red, White, Royal, and Nickel Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph Wilson General manager Marv Levy Mascot Billy Buffalo League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Francis Hughes Murkowski (born March 28, 1933) is an American politician and a member of the Republican Party. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Dino Rossi Dino Rossi (born October 15, 1959 in Seattle, Washington, USA) is a former Washington State Senator and the Republican nominee for Governor of Washington in the historically close 2004 election. ... John D. Spellman (Born December 29, 1926) was the Governor of Washington between 1981 and 1985. ... Navy Lieutenant Commander Charles Swift of the Department of Defense Office of Military Commissions served as defense counsel for Salim Ahmed Hamdan. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... Salim Ahmed Hamdan (born 1970) is a Yemeni, captured during the invasion of Afghanistan, and imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay. ... Note: This article is about the mountaineer. ... “Everest” redirects here. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Institutions by assetsPDF (257 KiB)
  2. ^ Valerie Bunn, Wedgwood Echo, volume 20, issue IV, July 2005, p.4.
  3. ^ King 5 News, King 5 News]. Accessed online 11 June 2007.
  4. ^ Campus scene (Centennial Fountain), captioned image on the Seattle U. web site]. Accessed online 28 February 2007.
  5. ^ Mayumi Tsutakawa, Tsutakawa, George (1910-1997), HistoryLink.org Essay 3088, April 19, 2001. Accessed online 28 February 2007.
  6. ^ a b Tina Potterf, Home Is Where the Art Is, Seattle University Magazine article reproduced on the Seattle University web site. Accessed online 28 February 2007.
  7. ^ John Pastier, Seattle University's Chapel of St. Ignatius, HistoryLink.org Essay 2931, January 6, 2001. Accessed online 28 February 2007.

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format created by Adobe Systems in 1993 for desktop publishing use. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

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