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Encyclopedia > Seattle Post Intelligencer

Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner The Hearst Corp.
Publisher Roger Oglesby
Editor David McCumber
Founded 1863
Headquarters Seattle, Washington, U.S.
ISSN 0745-970X

Website: www.SeattlePi.com

The daily Seattle Post-Intelligencer is the second leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. It has a daily circulation of 132,694 as of September 2005. Image File history File links Seattle Post-Intelligencer logo Source: Hearst Corporation This work is copyrighted. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Nickname: The Emerald City Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2, 1869 Mayor Greg Nickels Area    - City 369. ... United States is the current Good Article Collaboration of the week! Please help to improve this article to the highest of standards. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Nickname: The Emerald City Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2, 1869 Mayor Greg Nickels Area    - City 369. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,824 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Best-selling English language daily newspapers as of 2002, with circulation: The Sun 3,541,002 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mail 2,342,982 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mirror 2,148,058 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Times of India 2,144,842 India USA Today 2,120,357... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The P-I, Seattle's first newspaper, was founded on December 10, 1863 as the Seattle Gazette by J.R. Watson.[1][2] The paper failed after a few years and was renamed the Weekly Intelligencer in 1867 by the new owner, Sam Maxwell. The Intelligencer merged with the Seattle Post in 1881, this being the origin of the present-day name.[3] December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Circulation stood at 31,000 in 1911.[4] 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...


William Randolph Hearst took over the paper in 1921. The Hearst Corporation owns the P-I to this day.[5] William Randolph Hearst William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ...


Joint Operating Agreement - "JOA"

Since 1983, the P-I and The Seattle Times have been run under a "Joint Operating Agreement" (JOA) whereby advertising, production, marketing, and circulation are run for both papers by the Seattle Times Co. They maintain separate news and editorial departments. The papers put out a combined Sunday edition, whose circulation is 469,853, to which the P-I contributes only a few pages of editorial content. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The daily Seattle Times is the leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... A joint operating agreement (JOA) in the sense of this article is an arrangement whereby two daily newspapers published in the same city or geographic area find it convenient to operate certain business aspects together. ... Billboards and street advertising in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, (2005) Advertising is the business of kayleigh selling her body for fried chicken drawing public attention to goods and services, and performed through a variety of media. ... Marketing is a social and managerial function associated selling of product with the interchange of material and to satisfy the customer. ... News is new information or current events. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news, as the latter should ideally be done without bias. ...


In 2003 Times tried to cancel the JOA, citing a clause in the JOA that three consecutive years of profit losses were cause for cancelling the agreement. Hearst disagreed and immediately filed suit to prevent the Times from cancelling the agreement. Hearst argued that a force majeure clause prevented the Times from claiming losses in 2000 and 2001 as reason to end the JOA, because they resulted from extraordinary events (in this case, a seven week newspaper strike). Each side publicly accused the other of attempting to put its rival out of business. The trial judge granted a summary judgment in Hearst's favor on the force majeure issue. But after two appeals, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Times on June 30, 2005, on the force majeure clause, reversing the trial court judge. Now, the case goes back to the trial court to try the facts involved in several other causes of action in Hearst's suit.[6] 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Force majeure (French for greater force) is a common clause in contracts which essentially frees one or both parties from liabilities when an extraordinary event beyond the control of the parties, such as flood, war, riot, act of God, prevents one or both parties from fulfilling their obligations under the... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by various names in various states) is the highest state court in the state court system. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Awards

The P-I is notable for its excellent political coverage, its tradition of outstanding columnists and its two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist, David Horsey. Editorally, the P-I is seen as more liberal than the Times, endorsing Al Gore over George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election. However, both papers endorsed John Kerry over George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election. A Columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary. ... David Horsey (born 1951) is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist in the United States. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... |- ! Born | March 31, 1948 Washington, D.C. |} Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is 79 kilobytes or more in size. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Presidential election results map. ...


Report on Judge Gary Little

Notable investigative reporting on King County Superior Court Judge Gary Little's out-of-court contact with juvenile defendants revealed accusations that Little molested young boys while he was a teacher at Seattle's exclusive Lakeside School between 1968 and 1971. It also revealed inappropriate contact between Little and juveniles appearing before him after he became a judge. On 19 August 1988, after reporter Duff Wilson called the judge to advise him the newspaper was publishing the story, Little shot himself in the King County Courthouse. The ethical debates surrounding the publication of the story – and the network of connections that protected Little – are taught in journalism classes across the country, and led to reforms in the way judges are disciplined in Washington state. King County Superior Court, the largest trial court in Washington state, is based at the King County Courthouse, 516 Third Avenue, in downtown Seattle, Washington. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lakeside School Lakeside School is a private school for grades five through twelve located in the Haller Lake neighborhood at the north city limits of Seattle, Washington, USA. It was founded in 1914 by Frank Moran as the Moran School on Bainbridge Island. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Categories: Stub | King County, Washington | Seattle, WA ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek ethikos, meaning arising from habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of value or quality. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ...


Conduct Unbecoming series

In 2006 the PI was the subject of a complaint to the Washington News Council for its reporting on the King County Sheriff's Office. The media watch-dog group ruled against the PI, agreeing with Sheriff Sue Rahr's complaint that the newspaper had unfairly disparaged the Sheriff's Office.[7] The PI declined to participate in the proceedings, and opted instead to give a detailed reply on its website.[8] 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (514 words)
The daily Seattle Post-Intelligencer is the second leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States.
The P-I, Seattle's first paper, was founded on December 10, 1863 as the Seattle Gazette by J.R. Watson.
The Intelligencer merged with the Seattle Post in 1881, this being the origin of the present-day name.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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