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Encyclopedia > Season
Part of the Nature series on
Weather
 
Seasons
Temperate

SpringSummer
AutumnWinter
Galunggung in 1982, showing a combination of natural events. ... Weather is a term that encompasses phenomena in the atmosphere of a planet. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ...

Tropical

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... The dry season is a term commonly used when describing the weather in the tropics. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

ThunderstormTornado
Tropical Cyclone (Hurricane)
Winter stormBlizzard A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, Netherlands A storm is any disturbed state of an astronomical bodys atmosphere, especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... Look up Blizzard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Precipitation

FogDrizzleRain
Freezing rainSleet
HailSnow Golden Gate Bridge in Fog Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... A distant Rain Rain is a type of precipitation which forms when separate drops of water fall to the Earths surface from clouds. ... Freezing rain begins as snow, falling from a cloud towards earth and melts completely on its way down through a layer of relatively warm (above freezing) air. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Trees covered with snow Snow covering a leaf. ...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
ClimateAir pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... Satellite image of Hurricane Hugo with a polar low visible at the top of the image. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Weather map of Europe, 10 December 1887 Weather forecasting is the application of science and technology to predict the state of the atmosphere for a future time and a given location. ... Air pollution is a chemical, physical (e. ...

Weather Portal ·  v  d  e 

{| class="wikitable"


|- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1, cell 2 | row 1, cell 3 |- | row 2, cell 1 | row 2, cell 2summer hot | row 2, cell 3winter cold |}

Seasons
Temperate
Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter
Tropical
Dry
season
Cool
Hot
Wet season

Image:Example.jpg In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the sun is almost directly overhead. ... The dry season is a term commonly used when describing the weather in the tropics. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ... Image File history File links Example. ...


A season is one of the major divisions of the year, generally based on yearly periodic changes in weather. A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ...


In temperate and polar regions generally four seasons are recognized: spring, summer, autumn (fall), and winter. In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... Solar radiation has a lower intensity in polar regions because it travels a longer distance through the atmosphere, and is spread across a larger surface area. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ...


In some tropical and subtropical regions it is more common to speak of the rainy (or wet, or monsoon) season versus the dry season, as the amount of precipitation may vary more dramatically than the average temperature. A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the sun is almost directly overhead. ... Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya mountain range, central India A monsoon is a heavy rainy season which lasts for several months and has lasting climatic effects. ... The dry season is a term commonly used when describing the weather in the tropics. ...


In other tropical areas a three-way division into hot, rainy and cool season is used. In some parts of the world, special "seasons" are loosely defined based upon important events such as a hurricane season, tornado season or a wildfire season. This article is about weather phenomena. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... A wildfire, also known as a wildland fire, forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, peat fire (gambut in Indonesia), bushfire (in Australasia), or hill fire, is an uncontrolled fire often occurring in wildland areas, but which can also consume houses or agricultural resources. ...

Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the north. Far right: December solstice
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the north. Far right: December solstice
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the south. Far left: June solstice
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the south. Far left: June solstice

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1100, 213 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Equinox Season ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1100, 213 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Equinox Season ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1100, 193 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Equinox Season ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1100, 193 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Equinox Season ...

Causes and climatic effects

Fig. 1This is a diagram of the seasons. Note that, regardless of the time of day (i.e. the Earth's rotation on its axis), the North Pole will be dark, and the South Pole will be illuminated; see also arctic winter. In addition to the density of incident light, the dissipation of light in the atmosphere is greater when it falls at a shallow angle.
Fig. 1
This is a diagram of the seasons. Note that, regardless of the time of day (i.e. the Earth's rotation on its axis), the North Pole will be dark, and the South Pole will be illuminated; see also arctic winter. In addition to the density of incident light, the dissipation of light in the atmosphere is greater when it falls at a shallow angle.

The seasons result from the Earth's axis being tilted to its orbital plane; it deviates by an angle of approximately 23.5 degrees. Thus, at any given time during summer or winter, one part of the planet is more directly exposed to the rays of the Sun (see Fig. 1). This exposure alternates as the Earth revolves in its orbit. At any given time, regardless of season, the northern and southern hemispheres experience opposite seasons (see Fig. 2 and Month ranges of seasons (below) and Effect of sun angle on climate). Image File history File links Seasons. ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. ... The midnight sun at Nordkapp, Norway The midnight sun is a phenomenon, occurring in latitudes north of the arctic circle and south of the antarctic circle, where the sun is visible during at least 24 hours. ... A wave that loses amplitude is said to dissipate. ... Layers of Atmosphere - not to scale (NOAA)[3] Earths atmosphere is a layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth and retained by the Earths gravity. ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... The axis of rotation of a rotating body is a line such that the distance between any point on the line and any point of the body remains constant under the rotation. ... In astronomy, Axial tilt is the inclination angle of a planets rotational axis in relation to a perpendicular to its orbital plane. ... The orbital plane of an object orbiting another is the geometrical plane in which the orbit is embedded. ... A degree (in full, a degree of arc, arc degree, or arcdegree), usually symbolized °, is a measurement of plane angle, representing 1/360 of a full rotation. ... The Sun (Latin: Sol) is the star at the center of the Solar System. ... The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... Figure 1 This is a diagram of the seasons. ...


Seasonal weather fluctuations also depend on factors such as proximity to oceans or other large bodies of water, currents in those oceans, El Niño/ENSO and other oceanic cycles, and prevailing winds. Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... An ocean current is any more or less continuous, directed movement of ocean water that flows in one of the Earths oceans. ... El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the temperate and polar regions, seasons are marked by changes in the amount of sunlight, which in turn often causes cycles of dormancy in plants and hibernation in animals. These effects vary with latitude, and with proximity to bodies of water. For example, the South Pole is in the middle of the continent of Antarctica, and therefore a considerable distance from the moderating influence of the southern oceans. The North Pole is in the Arctic Ocean, and thus its temperature extremes are buffered by the presence of all that water. The result is that the South Pole is consistently colder during the southern winter than the North Pole during the northern winter. Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... A life cycle is a period involving one generation of an organism through means of reproduction, whether through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction. ... Dormancy is a arrested plant growth. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... This article refers to the process of hibernation in biology. ... “Animalia” redirects here. ...

Fig. 2
As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the seasons in the northern and southern hemispheres are opposite.

The cycle of seasons in the polar and temperate zones of one hemisphere is opposite to that in the other. When it is summer in the Northern hemisphere, it is winter in the Southern hemisphere, and vice versa, and when it is spring in the Northern hemisphere it is autumn in the Southern hemisphere, and vice versa. This is a diagram of the seasons that I made using Micrografx Designer software. ... The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ...


In the tropics, there is no noticeable change in the amount of sunlight. However, many regions (famously the northern Indian Ocean) are subject to monsoon rain and wind cycles. Curiously, a study of temperature records over the past 300 years (David Thompson, Science, April 1995) shows that the climatic seasons, and thus the seasonal year, are governed by the anomalistic year rather than the tropical year. A tropic is either of two circles of latitude: Tropic of Cancer, at 23½°N Tropic of Capricorn, at 23½°S Tropic is also the name of a town in Utah, United States. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya mountain range, central India A monsoon is a heavy rainy season which lasts for several months and has lasting climatic effects. ... A distant Rain Rain is a type of precipitation which forms when separate drops of water fall to the Earths surface from clouds. ... Science is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ... The seasonal year is the time between successive recurrences of a seasonal event such as the flooding of a river, the migration of a species of bird, or the flowering of a species of plant. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... A tropical year is the length of time that the Sun, as viewed from the Earth, takes to return to the same position along the ecliptic (its path among the stars on the celestial sphere). ...


In meteorological terms, the winter solstice and summer solstice (or the date maximum/minimum insolation) do not fall in the middle of winter and summer respectively. The heights of these seasons occur up to a month later due to seasonal lag. Seasons though, are not always defined in meteorological terms; see reckoning Meteorology is the scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Two images showing the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices respectively (watts / m²). A solstice occurs twice a year, whenever Earths axis tilts the most toward or away from the Sun, causing the Sun to be farthest north or south at noon. ... TOA and surface insolation, annual mean Insolation is the incoming solar radiation that reaches a planet and its atmosphere or, by extension, any object exposed to solar rays, such as watts per square meter of Sun-facing cross section, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum; most of that power is in... Seasonal lag is the phenomenon whereby the date of maximum average air temperature at a geographical location on a planet is delayed until some time after the date of maximum insolation. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Compared to axial tilt, other factors contribute little to seasonal temperature changes. It's a common misconception that the seasons are the result of the variation in Earth’s distance to the sun due to its elliptical orbit.[1] Orbital eccentricity can influence temperatures, but on Earth, this effect is small and is more than counteracted by other factors; research shows that the Earth as a whole is actually a few degrees warmer when farther from the sun.[2] Mars however experiences wide temperature variations and violent dust storms every year at perihelion.[3] Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics a elliptic orbit is an orbit with the eccentricity greater than 0 and less than 1. ... (This page refers to eccitricity in astrodynamics. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ...


Polar day and night

Illumination of the earth during various seasons
Illumination of the earth during various seasons

A common misconception is that, within the Arctic and Antarctic Circles, the sun rises once in the spring and sets once in the fall; thus, the day and night are erroneously thought to last uninterrupted for 183 calendar days each. This is true only in the immediate region of the poles themselves. Download high resolution version (735x765, 588 KB)These images shows the Earths sunlight on the equinoxes and solstices at exactly the same time of day (UT). ... Download high resolution version (735x765, 588 KB)These images shows the Earths sunlight on the equinoxes and solstices at exactly the same time of day (UT). ... World map showing the Arctic Circle in red A sign along the Dalton Highway marking the location of the Arctic Circle The Arctic Circle is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ... Zoomable PDF of the map this is based on The Antarctic Circle is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ...


What does happen is that any point north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle will have one period in the summer when the sun does not set, and one period in the winter when the sun does not rise. At progressively higher latitudes, the periods of "midnight sun" (or "midday dark" for the other side of the globe) are progressively longer. For example, at the military and weather station called Alert on the northern tip of Ellesmere Island, Canada (about 450 nautical miles or 830 km from the North Pole), the sun begins to peek above the horizon in mid-February and each day it climbs a bit higher, and stays up a bit longer; by 21 March, the sun is up for 12 hours. However, mid-February is not first light. The sky (as seen from Alert) has been showing twilight, or at least a pre-dawn glow on the horizon, for increasing hours each day, for more than a month before that first sliver of sun appears. The midnight sun at Nordkapp, Norway. ... It has been suggested that CFS Alert be merged into this article or section. ... Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... km redirects here. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... Twilight in Denmark, just after sunset Twilight in the midwestern US featuring Venus as a brilliant evening star and the crescent moon Finland - Lapland at midnight in July Twilight in Acapulco with Long time Exposure Early twilight in California, before sunset Twilight is the time before sunrise or after sunset...


In the weeks surrounding 21 June, the sun is at its highest, and it appears to circle the sky without ever going below the horizon. Eventually, it does go below the horizon, for progressively longer and longer periods each day until, around the middle of October, it disappears for the last time. For a few more weeks, "day" is marked by decreasing periods of twilight. Eventually, for the weeks surrounding 21 December, nothing breaks the darkness. In later winter, the first faint wash of light briefly touches the horizon (for just minutes per day), and then increases in duration and pre-dawn brightness each day until sunrise in February. June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Reckoning

Four Seasons

Month ranges of seasons
Tradition Meteorology Astronomy Months
(North/South)
Winter Winter Winter Jan/Jul
Spring Feb/Aug
Spring Mar/Sep
Spring Apr/Oct
Summer May/Nov
Summer Jun/Dec
Summer Jul/Jan
Autumn Aug/Feb
Autumn Sep/Mar
Autumn Oct/Apr
Winter Nov/May
Winter Dec/Jun

The date at which each of the four temperate season begins varies from culture to culture. In general there are three reckonings, "Astronomical", "Meteorological", and "Traditional".[4] The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ...


Astronomical

In Astronomical reckoning, the seasons begin at the astronomical solstices and equinoxes. The cross-quarter days are the midpoints of the Astronomical seasons. The length of these seasons is not uniform because of the elliptical orbit of the earth and its different speeds along that orbit (see Kepler's laws of planetary motion). Astronomy, which etymologically means law of the stars, (from Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος) is a science involving the observation and explanation of events occurring outside Earth and its atmosphere. ... Solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the Sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... In astronomy, an equinox is defined as the moment when the sun reaches one of two intersections between the ecliptic and the celestial equator. ... A cross-quarter day is a day falling halfway between one of the four main solar events (two solstices and two equinoxes) and the next one. ... Johannes Keplers primary contributions to astronomy/astrophysics were his three laws of planetary motion. ...


In the conventional US calendar,

  • Winter (89 days) begins on 20-23 Dec, the winter solstice,
  • Spring (92 days) on 19-22 Mar, the spring equinox,
  • Summer (93 days) on 19-23 June, the summer solstice, and
  • Autumn (90 days) on 21-24 Sept, the autumn equinox.

And, the cross-quarter days are considered seasonal midpoints, Two images showing the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices respectively (watts / m²). A solstice occurs twice a year, whenever Earths axis tilts the most toward or away from the Sun, causing the Sun to be farthest north or south at noon. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... In astronomy, the autumnal equinox signals the beginning of autumn in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading southward; the equinox occurs around September 22–September 24, varying slightly each year according to the 400-year cycle of leap years in... A cross-quarter day is a day falling halfway between one of the four main solar events (two solstices and two equinoxes) and the next one. ...

This article is about the Celtic holiday. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìdōng (pīnyīn) or Rittō (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立冬; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of winter) is the 19th solar term. ... Imbolc is one of the four principal festivals of the Irish calendar, celebrated either at the beginning of February or at the first local signs of Spring. ... 二十四節氣 solar terms 315° 330° 345° 0° 15° 30° 45° 60° 75° 90° 105° 120° 135° 150° 165° 180° 195° 210° 225° 240° 255° 270° 285° 300° The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìchūn (pīnyīn) or Risshun (rōmaji) (Chinese and... This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìxià (pīnyīn) or Rikka (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立夏; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of summer) is the 7th solar term. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìqiū (pīnyīn) or Risshū (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立秋; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of autumn) is the 13th solar term. ...

Meteorological

UTC Date and Time of Solstice and Equinox
year Equinox
Mar
Solstice
June
Equinox
Sept
Solstice
Dec
day time day time day time day time
2002 20 19:16 21 13:24 23 04:55 22 01:14
2003 21 01:00 21 19:10 23 10:47 22 07:04
2004 20 06:49 21 00:57 22 16:30 21 12:42
2005 20 12:33 21 06:46 22 22:23 21 18:35
2006 20 18:26 21 12:26 23 04:03 22 00:22
2007 21 00:07 21 18:06 23 09:51 22 06:08
2008 20 05:48 20 23:59 22 15:44 21 12:04
2009 20 11:44 21 05:45 22 21:18 21 17:47
2010 20 17:32 21 11:28 23 03:09 21 23:38
2011 20 23:21 21 17:16 23 09:04 22 05:30
2012 20 05:14 20 23:09 22 14:49 21 11:11
2013 20 11:02 21 05:04 22 20:44 21 17:11
2014 20 16:57 21 10:51 23 02:29 21 23:03

Meteorological seasons are reckoned by temperature, with summer being the hottest quarter of the year, and winter the coldest quarter of the year. ... Two images showing the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices respectively (watts / m²). A solstice occurs twice a year, whenever Earths axis tilts the most toward or away from the Sun, causing the Sun to be farthest north or south at noon. ... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ...


Using this reckoning, the Ancient Roman calendar began the year and the spring season on the first of March, with each season occupying three months. This reckoning is also used in Denmark, the former USSR, and Australia. In modern United Kingdom and Ireland there are no hard and fast rules about seasons, and informally many people use this reckoning. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


So, in meteorology for the Northern hemisphere: Satellite image of Hurricane Hugo with a polar low visible at the top of the image. ...

Conversely, for the Southern hemisphere: March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ...

Winter days

winter days are shorter in winter because the sun doesn't goas far up in the sky as it does in summer


Traditional

The four season mahjong tiles on the right and the four flower tiles on the other side. The flower tiles are arranged in accord to their growing seasons.
The four season mahjong tiles on the right and the four flower tiles on the other side. The flower tiles are arranged in accord to their growing seasons.
Personifications of the Four Seasons are a frequent theme in Roman mosaics, like this from Complutum.
Personifications of the Four Seasons are a frequent theme in Roman mosaics, like this from Complutum.

Traditional seasons are reckoned by insolation, with summer being the quarter of the year with the greatest insolation, and winter the quarter with the least. These seasons begin about 4 weeks earlier than the Meteorological seasons, and 7 weeks earlier than the Astronomical seasons. Image File history File links Mahjong-flowersseasons. ... Image File history File links Mahjong-flowersseasons. ... Mahjong (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeung; or Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeuk; other common English spellings include mahjongg, majiang, and hyphenated forms such as mah-jong or mah-jongg) is a game for four players that originated in China. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1241x1549, 371 KB) Summary Roman mosaic of the Four Seasons from the House of Bacchus in Complutum (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1241x1549, 371 KB) Summary Roman mosaic of the Four Seasons from the House of Bacchus in Complutum (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain). ... Alcalá de Henares is a Spanish city. ... TOA and surface insolation, annual mean Insolation is the incoming solar radiation that reaches a planet and its atmosphere or, by extension, any object exposed to solar rays, such as watts per square meter of Sun-facing cross section, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum; most of that power is in...


In Traditional reckoning, the seasons begin at the cross-quarter days. The solstices and equinoxes are the midpoints of these seasons. For example, the days of greatest and least insolation are considered the "midwinter" and "midsummer" respectively. A cross-quarter day is a day falling halfway between one of the four main solar events (two solstices and two equinoxes) and the next one. ...


This reckoning is used by various traditional cultures in the Northern Hemisphere, including East Asian and Irish cultures. A Solar term is one of 24 days in the traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars that match a particular astronomical events or signify some natural phenomenon. ...


So, according to Traditional reckoning,

  • Winter begins on 5-10 Nov, Samhain, 立冬 (lìdōng),
  • Spring on 2-7 Feb, Imbolc, 立春 (lìchūn),
  • Summer on 4-10 May, Beltane, 立夏 (lìxià), and
  • Autumn on 3-10 Aug, Lughnasadh, 立秋 (lìqiū).

And, the middle of each season is considered, This article is about the Celtic holiday. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìdōng (pīnyīn) or Rittō (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立冬; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of winter) is the 19th solar term. ... Imbolc is one of the four principal festivals of the Irish calendar, celebrated either at the beginning of February or at the first local signs of Spring. ... 二十四節氣 solar terms 315° 330° 345° 0° 15° 30° 45° 60° 75° 90° 105° 120° 135° 150° 165° 180° 195° 210° 225° 240° 255° 270° 285° 300° The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìchūn (pīnyīn) or Risshun (rōmaji) (Chinese and... This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìxià (pīnyīn) or Rikka (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立夏; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of summer) is the 7th solar term. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Lìqiū (pīnyīn) or Risshū (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 立秋; Korean: ; Vietnamese: ; literally: start of autumn) is the 13th solar term. ...

Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern hemisphere winter solstice Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the southern hemisphere winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is... Midwinter redirects here. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... Two images showing the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices respectively (watts / m²). A solstice occurs twice a year, whenever Earths axis tilts the most toward or away from the Sun, causing the Sun to be farthest north or south at noon. ... In astronomy, the autumnal equinox signals the beginning of autumn in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading southward; the equinox occurs around September 22–September 24, varying slightly each year according to the 400-year cycle of leap years in... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ...

Australian Aboriginal

Month Minang Arrernte Gadgerong Tasmania
January Beruc Uterne Mayurr Wegtellanyta
Feb/Mar Meertilluc
April Pourner Alhwerrrpeurle Nguag/Gagulong
May Tunna
Jun/Jul Mawkur Alhwerrpa
August Meerningal
September Ulpulpe Pawenya peena
Oct/Nov Uterne urle Bandenyirrin
December Beruc Uterne Wegtellanyta


In Australia, the aborigines defined the seasons by what was happening to the plants, animals and weather around them. This led to each separate tribal group have different seasons, some with up to 8 seasons a year. However most modern Australians follow the Meteorological Seasons.


Seasons in images

In hemiboreal and temperate climates: Hemiboreal means halfway between the temperate and subarctic (or boreal) zones. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ...

See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In an organised sports league, a season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session. ...

External links

Dr. Philip Plait (a. ... Cecil Adams is the pen name of the author of The Straight Dope since 1973, a popular question and answer column published in The Chicago Reader, syndicated in thirty newspapers in the United States and Canada, and available online. ... H2G2 is also an acronym for the The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ...

References

  1. ^ PhysicalGeography.net, Fundamentals of physical geography, Ch.6:Energy and Matter:(h) Earth-Sun Geometry, [1]
  2. ^ Phillips, Tony, "The Distant Sun (Strange but True: the Sun is far away on the 4th of July)," [email protected], downloaded 24 June 2006
  3. ^ Christian Ho, Nasser Golshan, and Arvydas Kliore, Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars, JPL Publication 02-5, pp. 59-60, downloaded 23 June 2006
  4. ^ The Straight Dope: Is it true summer in Ireland starts May 1?

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