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Encyclopedia > Search for Tomorrow
Search for Tomorrow

Search for Tomorrow title card from 1981 to February 1986.
Format soap opera
Created by Roy Winsor
Starring Mary Stuart
Larry Haines
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
Language(s) English
No. of episodes 9130
Production
Camera setup multi-camera
Running time 15 minutes (1951-1968)
30 minutes (1968-1986)
Broadcast
Original channel CBS (1951-1982)
NBC (1982-1986)
Audio format monaural
Original run September 3, 1951December 26, 1986
External links
IMDb profile

Search for Tomorrow was a soap opera which started airing on Monday, September 3, 1951 on CBS. The show was moved from CBS, its original broadcaster, on Friday, March 26, 1982, with NBC picking it up on the following Monday, March 29, 1982. It continued on NBC until the final episode was aired on Friday, December 26, 1986. Search for Tomorrow, used from 1981 to February 1986. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... Mary Stuart, in a photographed still from Search for Tomorrow, ca. ... Larry Haines (born Larry Hecht on August 3, 1918 in Mount Vernon, New York) is an American actor. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A multi-camera setup is a film production technique wherein multiple cameras shoot the same action from different angles. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about the television network. ... Label for 1. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1950 in television, other events of 1951, 1952 in television and the list of years in television. // Events May 28 - The US Supreme Court upholds the FCCs approval of the CBS color television system. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1986 in television involved some significant events. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


The show was created by Roy Winsor and was first written by Agnes Nixon (who was then known professionally as "Agnes Eckhardt") for thirteen weeks and, later, by Irving Vendig. Agnes Nixon Agnes Nixon (born Agnes Eckhardt on December 27, 1927) is a Daytime Emmy award-winning writer and producer. ...

Contents

John William Corrington (1932-1988)

John William Corrington received a B.A. degree from Centenary College in 1956 and his M.A. from Rice University in 1960, the year he took on his first teaching position in the English Department at LSU. While on leave from LSU, Corrington obtained his D.Phil. in 1965 from the University of Sussex, and then, in 1966, moved to Loyola University-New Orleans as Associate Professor of English, where he also served as chair of the English Department. Corrington graduated from Tulane Law School in 1975, joined a small New Orleans personal injury law firm, Plotkin & Bradley, and spend the next three years practicing law. Centenary College is a private college affiliated with the United Methodist Church and located in Hackettstown, New Jersey. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, or simply Louisiana State University or LSU is a public university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... The University of Sussex (also known colloquially as Sussex Uni) is an English campus university which is situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, and is four miles from Brighton. ... Several historic and current educational institutions are named in honor of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian university headquartered in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Corrington gave up the practice of law in 1978, and working with his wife Joyce, they became head writers for the daytime drama, Search For Tomorrow (CBS). From 1978 to 1988, the Corrington and his wife Joyce wrote scripts for Search For Tomorrow (CBS)(1978-80)(477 episodes); Another World (1980)(NBC)(23 episodes); Texas, a series they created and wrote, 1980-82 (NBC)(147 episodes); General Hospital (1982)(ABC)(54 episodes); Capitol (1982-83)(CBS)(167 episodes); One Life To Live (1984)(ABC)(98 episodes); and finally, Superior Court, a syndicated series (1986-89)(238 episodes). Search for Tomorrow was a soap opera which started airing on Monday, September 3, 1951 on CBS. The show was moved from CBS, its original broadcaster, on Friday, March 26, 1982, with NBC picking it up on the following Monday, March 29, 1982. ... Another World is a book by Pat Barker. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see General Hospital (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Capitol (disambiguation). ... One Life to Live (OLTL) is an American soap opera which has been broadcast on the ABC television network since July 15, 1968. ... In law, and more specifically, in the Anglo-American common law legal tradition, a superior court is a court of general jurisdiction over all, or major, civil and criminal cases. ...


Transition to tape

Search aired as a live, fifteen-minute serial from its debut in 1951 until 1968. The show's first sponsors were "Joy dishwashing liquid" and "Spic and Span" household cleaner. As the show's ratings increased, more sponsors began buying commercial time. Both "Joy" and "Spic and Span" continued to be the primary sponsors of the show well into the 1960s. Joy dishwashing liquid is a major brand of dish-cleaning detergent product made by U.S.-based personal and cleaning products manufacturer and marketer Procter & Gamble. ... One of the first Spic and Span television ads. ...


The show switched to a half hour in 1968 and became one of the first soap operas to move from live broadcasts to tape.


In 1983, both the master copy and the backup of a Search episode were lost, and on August 4, the cast was forced to do a live show for the first time since the transition fifteen years before. After the event, NBC was accused of lying about the tape being misplaced in hopes that the noise generated by the snafu would create a ratings jump for the show. It was thought that this situation mirrored a similar one in the 1982 movie Tootsie. is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... George Fields and Dorothy Michaels at the Russian Tea Room Tootsie is a 1982 comedy film that tells the story of a talented but volatile actor whose reputation for being difficult makes it hard for him to find work. ...


Title sequences

Search for Tomorrow title card, first used in black-and-white from 1951 to 1967.
Search for Tomorrow title card, first used in black-and-white from 1951 to 1967.
Search for Tomorrow title card from 1967 to 1981.

Throughout its entire thirty-five year run, Search's opening titles featured of a shot of clouds floating through the sky. In fact, they consisted entirely of that until 1981. The only noticeable change was the slightly altered "S" in "Search" upon switching to color (note the first two title cards). In 1981, they switched to a glitzy new videotaped opening sequence beginning with a shot of a seagull flying over the ocean, followed by a helicopter shot of the clouds in the midday sky (see the third title card). In the show's final months, the titles featured a montage of cast clips, bookended with sky shots. Search for Tomorrow, used from 1951 to 1967. ... Search for Tomorrow, used from 1951 to 1967. ... Search for Tomorrow, used from 1967 to 1981. ... Search for Tomorrow, used from 1967 to 1981. ...


The theme music for the early years sounded a little like "Beyond the Blue Horizon" to some, which would have seemed quite appropriate for this show given the opening visuals. Upon switching to color, a theme titled "Interchange" by Bill Meeder was used for the opening, and later on in 1974, a short-lived theme titled "Signature for Search for Tomorrow" by Ashley Miller (by then, it was still using in-studio organ accompaniment).


From November 1974 to February 1986, Search used a pop ballad theme: "We'll Search for Tomorrow" by Jon Silbermann, Jack Cortner, and John Barranco. This followed a trend initiated by The Young and the Restless for using pop ballads for soap theme tunes. Several arrangements were used during its 12-year run: the original version, a more orchestral version, a Latin disco-flavored version, and a vocal version for closing credits. For other uses, see Young and Restless. ...


The final months' title sequence was accompanied by a new "techno-rock" theme by Billy Chinnock called "Somewhere in the Night".


Announcements

For much of the show's run on CBS, the announcer was Dwight Weist, who years earlier had narrated several short subjects for MGM. The common structure of his announcements went like this: For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ...

  • Opening titles: "This is Search For Tomorrow. This portion brought to you by (name and description of sponsor)".
  • Mid-program break #1: "This portion of Search For Tomorrow was brought to you by (name and description of sponsor). Our story will continue in just a moment."
  • Mid-program break #2: "And now, the second portion of Search For Tomorrow." On days when the second half was officially sponsored, the announcement continued, "...brought to you by (name and description of sponsor)."
  • Lead-in to next-to-last commercial break: "Our story will continue in just a moment!"
  • Closing titles: "This portion of Search For Tomorrow has been brought to you by (name and description of sponsor).", or on non-sponsored days, either "Join us each weekday for Search For Tomorrow.", or, if no time remained, "This has been Search For Tomorrow, this program was recorded."

When Weist retired to found his own public relations/casting company, former rock disc jockey Allison Steele assumed the announcing duties with similar announcements as above. Her job carried over into the first few years of NBC's run until Hal Simms (former announcer for The Edge of Night) took over for the remainder of the series, though Simms' announcements were limited. Don Pardo did a one-off duty for the NBC show that aired live. The Edge of Night was a long-running American television soap opera. ... Dominick George Don Pardo (born February 22, 1918 in Westfield, Massachusetts) is a legendary American radio and television announcer. ...


History

The '50s

For the show's duration, Search was centered on a midwestern housewife named Joanne (played the entire time by Mary Stuart) who lived in a fictional town called Henderson. In the earlier years, Joanne's friends and next-door neighbors, Stuart and Marge Bergman (played by Larry Haines and Melba Rae) received much screen time as they commiserated with Joanne, usually over a cup of coffee at the kitchen table. At the beginning of the series, Stu and Marge had a young daughter named Janet (originally played by Ellen Spencer). Joanne in 1972 Joanne Gardner was the main character on the long-running soap opera Search for Tomorrow. ... Mary Stuart, in a photographed still from Search for Tomorrow, ca. ... Larry Haines (born Larry Hecht on August 3, 1918 in Mount Vernon, New York) is an American actor. ... Melba Rae (October 7, 1922 - December 30, 1971) was an American soap opera actress. ...


Most of Joanne's dilemmas, in the early years, were due to her dead husband Keith Barron's overbearing parents – they never liked her and were quite content with seizing Joanne and Keith's daughter Patti (played longest by Lynn Loring) from the widow. Lynn Loring (born July 14, 1944) is an American actress and producer. ...


After Keith (played by John Sylvester White) died in 1952, Joanne started managing a hotel, The Motor Haven Inn. Local thugs in town saw Joanne as soft because she was a woman, and they attempted to take over the business as a front for Mafia dealings. Joanne's friend Rose Peabody (Lee Grant, Constance Ford, and Nita Talbot), who was selling information to the Mafia, tried to poison a pot of soup that Joanne made, so her credibility would be tarnished. In the end, the scheme did not work and it was Rose who perished. A man named Arthur Tate (Terry O'Sullivan) helped Joanne with financial backing for the Inn. Arthur's Aunt Cornelia gave him the inheritance money but insisted on meddling in his affairs as she hated Joanne. Eventually, Arthur and Jo fell in love and were married. John Sylvester White (October 31, 1919 - September 11, 1988) was an American actor, best known for his starring role as Keith Barron on the television soap opera Search for Tomorrow from 1951 to 1952, and to a different generation as Mr. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... Lee Grant (October 31, 1927 in New York, New York) is an American theater, film and television actress, and film director who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Constance Ford in 1941 photo by Philippe Halsman used by Elizabeth Arden to advertise Victory Red lipstick. ... Terry OSullivan (July 7, 1915 — September 14, 2006) was an American actor, best known for his role on the soap opera Search for Tomorrow as Arthur Tate (1952-1955, 1956-1966). ...


The '60s

The show was one of the highest-rated soaps in the 1950s, but Search was losing out to newer soaps as the decade drew to a close. When the show was in a ratings slump in 1960, Western-themed drama writers Frank and Doris Hursley were hired to write the show. In 1963, with the ratings staying stagnant, the duo decided to write out Joanne's baby (written into the storyline a few years previous while she was pregnant with son Jeffrey) by having him run in front of a speeding truck and die upon impact. Miss Stuart was unhappy with the decision and, in the book All My Afternoons, Stuart was paraphrased as saying that she played the grief scenes with so much conviction that even the makeup lady could not bear to watch her to see if her makeup was right. In the end, the ratings did not rise, and Stuart threatened to quit the show unless the Hursleys were fired. The duo left the show and created the serial General Hospital for ABC the same year. Frank M. Hursley (November 21, 1902–February 3, 1989) and Doris Hursley (September 29, 1898–May 5, 1984) were a husband-and-wife team who wrote American soap operas. ... For other uses, see General Hospital (disambiguation). ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ...


As the show progressed, Joanne's sister Eunice returned to town and seduced Joanne's second husband, Arthur Tate. When a woman named Marian Rand came to town and sued Arthur for paternity, the stress surrounding this dilemma, coupled with personal troubles and the guilt of sleeping with Eunice caused him to have a fatal heart attack.


Joanne's daughter Patti grew into a teenager and got involved with drug-dealing gang members (incorporating a scathing viewpoint regarding America's counter-culture of the day). Joanne's friend Sam Reynolds (who was, ironically, Arthur's archenemy) proved his worth to Joanne by saving Patti when she was held at knifepoint. They were going to be married, but alas, it was not to be. Actor Robert Mandan, who played Sam, did not renew his contract with the show. Robert Mandan (born February 2, 1932 in Clever, Missouri) is an American actor. ...


The '70s

In 1970, Joanne lost her eyesight, and Dr. Tony Vincente (Anthony George) helped her get it back. They fell in love and were married in 1972. In 1974, Mary-Ellis Bunim was appointed executive producer of Search for Tomorrow. As a result of Bunim wanting to take the show in a more youth-oriented direction, fewer stories involved Joanne. In 1975, Bunim was rumored to have the writers of Search for Tomorrow kill off Joanne (after the death of Tony), which ended up not happening after vocal dissent from Stuart in the press. While the ratings took a slight dip when the series focused on younger viewers, the impact wasn't as heavy as was expected. Anthony George (born January 29, 1921; died March 16, 2005) was an American actor mostly seen on television. ... Mary-Ellis Bunim (July 9, 1946 - January 29, 2004) was a producer and co-creator of MTVs The Real World and Road Rules. ...


In 1971, Stu and Marge's daughter Janet returned to the series and served as a peer to which Joanne's daughter Patti can relate. Early in 1972, Marge's sudden death was written into the storyline (actress Melba Rae had died late the year before). Stu later married Ellie Harper (Billie Lou Watt) and helped Jo run the Hartford House, a modern incarnation of her old property, the Motor Haven Inn. Billie Lou Watt (June 22, 1924 - September 7, 2001) was an actress in theater and television, including several voice acting roles for commercials and animated series. ...


Examples of the "younger" stories included the maniacal Jennifer Pace (played by Morgan Fairchild); Jennifer shot and killed Joanne's sister Eunice after a vision of Eunice's husband John Wyatt (Val Dufour), whom Jennifer was having an affair with, told her to do the murderous deed. Another popular story on the show was the budding romance between the characters of Steve and Liza Kaslo (Michael Nouri and Meg Bennett). Jennifer Pace Phillips was a fictional character on the now-cancelled American Soap Opera Search for Tomorrow. ... Morgan Fairchild (born February 3, 1950) is an American actress. ... Val Dufour, born Albert Valéry Dufour (February 5, 1927 — July 27, 2000) was an American actor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Meg Bennett is an actress best known for playing Victor Newmans first Wife, Julia, on The Young And The Restless. ...


The '80s

The show was doing fine in the afternoon ratings (the show consistently ranked #4 in the soap ratings throughout most of the 1970s) until the decision was made to move the show to 2:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) in 1981 (the show had aired at 12:30 p.m. since its first episode thirty years before). Procter and Gamble considered expanding Search for Tomorrow and As the World Turns to 45 minutes in length and eliminating the time that most local stations aired newscasts. The final decision was to not expand these two show and to move Search for Tomorrow to a later timeslot. The show still had many fans, but the ratings weren't near the level they had once been. As the ratings continued to tank, CBS finally cancelled Search for Tomorrow in early 1982, but Procter and Gamble was not willing to give up on the show yet. The final episode aired on CBS on March 26, 1982, with the show moving to NBC three days later. The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... This article is about the television network. ...


Although the soap switched networks,it was still produced at the CBS Broadcast Center at 524 West 57th St. in Manhattan until August, 1982. By September of that year, NBC relocated the production to the Reeves/Teletape Studio on Broadway and West 81st St., the former home of Sesame Street (which themselves had relocated to another studio at 9th Ave and 55th St.). It remained there until March 1985, when they moved to the former Edge of Night studios, the EUE/Screen Gems Studios at 222 East 44th St, where it remained until its final episode in December, 1986.


In an advertising campaign called "Follow the Search", the stars of the show wished for its loyal viewers to follow Search for Tomorrow to NBC. However, CBS only allowed the advertisements if Procter & Gamble did not name the network to which the show was moving in their advertisements (something CBS also decreed when The Edge of Night moved to ABC in 1975). At the end of the final CBS episode, veteran actors Mary Stuart and Larry Haines told the audience to start watching the show as it moved to "another network", and asked the viewers to locate them in their television listings. The Edge of Night was a long-running American television soap opera. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ...


The ratings stayed 50% lower than they had been on CBS, even in the 2:30 slot. By this time, Joanne's final marriage to Martin Tourneur (John Aniston) did not interest many viewers, and the show was chastised for preposterous storylines: in one heroine's case, she gave birth to a baby just three months after conception. This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


By 1984, the show mainly focused on two new families: the Kendalls and the McClearys. The McCleary family was headed by mother Kate McCleary (Jo Henderson then by Maeve McGuire), brothers Hogan McCleary (David Forsyth), Cagney McCleary (Matthew Ashford), Quinn McCleary (Jeffrey Meek), and sister Adair McCleary (Paige Hannah then by Susan Carney Lamn). The Kendall family was headed by father Lloyd Kendall (Peter Haskell, Joe Lambie then Robert Reed), brothers Alec Kendall (Robert Curtis Brown), Chase Kendall (Kevin Conroy then by Robert Wilson), and sister Theresa Rebecca (T.R.) Kendall (Jane Krakowski). In a newspaper interview during this period (The Videot), Mary Stuart complained, "They have created a new program and they're calling it 'Search for Tomorrow.'" She said she believed she was being eased out by the Kate McCleary character. Maeve McGuire (born July 24, 1937 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American actress, best known for her role as Nicole Travis Drake on the soap opera The Edge of Night, which she played from 1968 to 1974 and from 1975 to 1977. ... David Forsyth (born September 18, 1947) is a well-known American soap opera actor. ... Matthew Nile Ashford (born January 29, 1960 in Davenport, Iowa) is an American actor. ... Jeffrey Meek as Jonathon Raven, Jeffrey William Meek (born on February 11, 1959) is a renowned TV and film artist. ... This article is about the American actor. ... Robert Curtis Brown (born April 1957 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, USA) is an American television, film and stage actor. ... Kevin Conroy Kevin Conroy (born November 30, 1955) is an American actor of stage, screen, and voice, best known for his portrayal of DC Comics superhero Batman in numerous animated series and features. ... Robert Wilson may refer to: Rob Wilson MP for Reading East Sir Robert Wilson (astronomer), a British astronomer Sir Robert Wilson (businessman), chairman of BG Group Sir Robert Thomas Wilson, a British general and politician Robert L. Wilson (1920-1944), U.S. Marine, Medal of Honor recipient, killed in action... Jane Krakowski (née Krajkowski, born October 11, 1968 in Parsippany, New Jersey) is a Tony Award-winning American actress and singer. ...


The show was canceled in 1986, but only after a memorable attempt to bring up the ratings: The whole town of Henderson was washed away in a flood. In a display of reverence, the only buildings that were left standing after the flood were Joanne's residence and business.


The final episode ended with senior characters Stu Bergman and Joanne Tourneur talking about the future. Stu asked Joanne what she was searching for, and she answered, "Tomorrow, and I can't wait." This was followed by a taped piece in which Mary Stuart thanked the show's viewers for their loyalty over the past 35 years. The show also ended with the song We'll Be Together Again by Lou Rawls (Love of Life also closed out it's run with the same song, but used the Tony Bennett version). Louis Allen Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006[1]) was a Chicago-born American soul music, jazz, and blues singer. ... Love of Life was an American soap opera which aired on CBS from September 24, 1951 to February 1, 1980. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ...


Location Shooting

Like many other soap operas, Search for Tomorrow did a lot of location shooting. In 1981 the show went to Hong Kong, and later that year, to Jamaica, to showcase a romantic rendezvous between the characters of Garth and Kathy. In 1982 prior to the switch to NBC, a storyline involving Travis Sentell took the show on location in St. Kitts. In 1984 the show did a lot of location shooting to show the wilds of Henderson. In the final months of the show in 1986, they went to Ireland to film a storyline with the McCleary brothers, who by that time occupied most of the storylines. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Saint Kitts (also/previously known as Saint Christopher) is an island in the Caribbean. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


Ratings history

Search for Tomorrow was among the highest-rated soaps of the 1950s and 1960s, but by the early 1970s it had slipped to the middle of the pack. However, during that decade the show gained renewed popularity and peaked at 4th in the ratings.


Although ratings would not remain as high, Search for Tomorrow continued to generate decent ratings up to 1982, even if it had become CBS' lowest-rated soap opera. With the move to NBC (whose soap operas all had considerable lower ratings than Search for Tomorrow at the time), viewership halved and the show fell to the bottom of the pack.


In 1981, CBS wanted its newer serial The Young and the Restless to lead off the afternoon soap lineup and moved Search For Tomorrow to 2:30 p.m. ET time between As the World Turns and Guiding Light. The show still got decent ratings, but Procter and Gamble who owned the show wanted the show back at 12:30 p.m. In March 1982, P&G moved the show to NBC at 12:30 (bumping the low rated soap The Doctors to Noon) with disastrous ratings results. Many NBC affiliates already pre-empted The Doctors that had been airing at 12:30 so in some instances, SFT disappeared altogether from some markets when it left CBS for NBC. NBC cancelled The Doctors in December 1982, while SFT held on for four more years until December 26, 1986. Ironically, Capitol, the show that replaced Search for Tomorrow on CBS, aired its last episode on March 20, 1987, lasting only a few months longer than Search for Tomorrow's run on NBC. Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... The Doctors was a soap opera which aired on NBC from April 1, 1963 to December 31, 1982. ...


Reruns

In the late 1980s, reruns of Search for Tomorrow aired in a nightly late-night timeslot on cable's USA Network,episodes of which were from NBC's 1982-1985 timeframe. USA Network is a popular American cable television network with about 89 million household subscribers as of 2005. ...


In 2006, Procter & Gamble began making several of its soap operas available, a few episodes at a time, through America Online's AOL Video service, downloadable free of charge. Reruns of Search for Tomorrow episodes began from October 1984. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This page is about the year 1984. ...


External links

  • Search for Tomorrow at the Internet Movie Database
  • Search episodes through AOL Video
  • World of Soap Themes: Search multimedia page (registration required)
  • Search for Tomorrow Script Collection at Syracuse University Special Collection Research Center - breakdowns and scripts from 550+ episodes, 1971-1974

 
 

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