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Encyclopedia > Seahorse
Hippocampus
Fossil range: Pliocene to Present
Hippocampus sp.
Hippocampus sp.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Syngnathiformes
Family: Syngnathidae
Genus: Hippocampus
Cuvier, 1816[1]
Species

See text for species. Seahorse (fish) refers to a marine fish belonging to the genus Hippocampus. ... The Pliocene epoch (spelled Pleiocene in some older texts) is the period in the geologic timescale that extends from 5. ... A hippocampus photo by NOAA File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders See text The Actinopterygii are the ray-finned fish. ... -1... Syngnathidae is a family of fishes, including seahorses, pipehorse, pipefish and sea dragons, among others. ...

Seahorses are a genus (Hippocampus) of fish belonging to the family Syngnathidae, which also includes pipefish and leafy sea dragons. There are over 32 species of seahorse, mainly found in shallow tropical and temperate waters throughout the world. They prefer to live in sheltered areas such as sea grass beds, coral reefs, or mangroves. Colonies have been found in European waters such as the Thames Estuary.[2] From North America down to South America there are approximately four species, ranging from very small in size (dwarf seahorses are only about an inch long) to those much larger, found off the Pacific Coast of Central America (the foot-long Hippocampus ingens). Hippocampus erectus are larger seahorses found anywhere from Nova Scotia down to around Uruguay.[3] These fish form territories, with males staying in about one square meter of their habitat while females range about one hundred times that area. They bob around in sea grass meadows, mangrove stands, and coral reefs where they are camouflaged by murky brown and grey patterns that blend into the sea grass backgrounds. During social moments or in unusual surroundings, seahorses turn bright colors. According to co-founder of Project Seahorse, Amanda J. Vincent, mates can blush a shade of creamy yellow when meeting each other in the morning. She even encountered one male who took the shade of the orange tape she used to mark the grid in the study area. [4] For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ... Syngnathidae is a family of fishes, including seahorses, pipehorse, pipefish and sea dragons, among others. ... Genera See text. ... Binomial name (Günther, 1865) The leafy sea dragon, Phycodurus eques, is a marine fish related to the seahorse. ... The Thames Estuary is a large estuary where the River Thames flows into the North Sea. ... North American redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Binomial name (Girard, 1859) The Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Motto: Munit Hae et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Largest metro Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto), French Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate...

Contents

Physical description

Seahorses are so named for their equine appearance. Although they are fish, they do not have scales, rather a thin skin stretched over a series of bony plates arranged in rings throughout their body. Each species has a distinct number of rings. Seahorses swim upright, another characteristic that is not shared by their fish relatives who swim horizontally. Seahorses have a coronet on their head, which is distinct to each seahorse, much like a human fingerprint. They swim very poorly by using a dorsal fin, which they rapidly flutter to propel them, and pectoral fins, located behind their eyes, which they use to steer. Because they are poor swimmers, they are most likely to be found resting in sea grasses or coral reefs with their prehensile tails wound around a stationary object. They have long snouts, which they use to suck up food, and eyes that can move independently of each other. Seahorses eat small shrimp, tiny fish and plankton. Because they camouflage, it is very hard for scientists to find them as well as predators.


Courtship

When two parties discover a mutual interest at the beginning of breeding season, they court for several days, even while others try to interfere. During this time they have been known to change color, swim side by side holding tails or grip the same strand of sea grass with their tails and wheel around in unison in what is known as their “pre-dawn dance”. They eventually engage in their “true courtship dance” lasting about 8 hours, during which the male pumps water through the egg pouch on his trunk which expands and cleaves open to display an appealing emptiness. When the female’s eggs reach maturity, she and her mate let go of any anchors and snout-to-snout, drift upward out of the seagrass, often spiraling as they rise. "The female inserts her ovipositor into the male’s brood pouch, where she deposits her eggs, which the male fertilizes. The fertilized eggs then embed in the pouch wall and become enveloped with tissues."[5] New research indicates the male releases sperm into the surrounding sea water during fertilization, and not directly into the pouch as was previously thought.[6] Most seahorse species' pregnancies lasts approximately two to three weeks. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


As the female squirts anywhere from dozens to thousands of eggs from a chamber in her trunk into his pouch, her body slims while his swells. Both seahorses then sink back to the bottom and she swims off. Scientists believe the courtship behavior serves to synchronize the movements of the two animals so that the male can receive the eggs when the female is ready to deposit them. The eggs are then fertilized in the father’s pouch which is coursed with prolactin, the same hormone responsible for milk production in pregnant women. He doesn’t supply milk, but his pouch provides oxygen as well as a controlled environment incubator. The eggs then hatch in the pouch where the salinity of the water is regulated. This prepares the newborns for life in the sea.[7] [8] Throughout the male’s pregnancy, his mate visits him daily for “morning greetings”. The female seahorse swims over for about 6 minutes of interaction reminiscent of courtship. “They change color, wheel around sea grass fronds, and finally promenade, holding each other’s tails. Then, the female swims away until the next morning, and the male goes back to vacuuming up food through his snout.” [9] Suitor redirects here. ... Prolactin (PRL) is a peptide hormone primarily associated with lactation. ...


Birth

The male seahorse can give birth to as many as 2,000 "fry" at a time and pregnancies last anywhere from 40 to 50 days, depending on the species. When the fry are ready to be born, the male undergoes muscular contractions to expel them from his pouch. He typically gives birth at night and is ready for the next batch of eggs by morning when his mate returns. Like almost all other fish species, seahorses do not care for their young once they are born. Infants are susceptible to death from predators or being swept into ocean currents, where they drift away from rich feeding grounds or into temperatures too extreme for their delicate bodies. Fewer than five infants of every 1,000 born survive to adulthood, helping to explain why litters are so large. The survival rates of these infants are actually fairly high compared to fish standards, because they are initially sheltered in their father’s pouch during the earliest stages of development, while the eggs of most other fish are abandoned immediately after fertilization. [10] This makes the process worth the great cost to the father of incubating his offspring.


Costs

This entire process costs the male a great amount of energy. This brings into question why the sexual role reversal even takes place. In an environment where one partner incurs more energy costs than the other, you would expect the lesser of the two to be the aggressor. Within the seahorse species, males are shown to be the more aggressive sex and sometimes “fight” for female attention. According to Amanda Vincent of Project Seahorse, only males tail-wrestled and even snap their heads toward each other. This discovery prompted further study in finding out whether males actually are incurring more costs than their female counterparts. To estimate the female’s direct contribution, researcher Heather D. Masonjones of Amherst College performed a chemical analysis of the energy stored in each egg. Furthermore, to measure the toll that pregnancy takes on a male, Masonjones built a tiny respirator that records oxygen concentrations in water flowing into and out of a chamber. Before a male became pregnant, she checked his baseline need for oxygen. Then, she monitored the increase as pregnancy progressed. The male’s body had to work hard by the end of the pregnancy, consuming almost a third again as much oxygen as he did before mating. To correct for oxygen used by the growing brood, Masonjones managed to keep ¼ inch-high preemie seahorses alive outside the pouch so she could measure their oxygen needs. Although they undergo weeks of pregnancy, males directly contribute only half as much energy for offspring as females do. [11]Therefore, they do in fact fit into the widespread pattern of the less-invested sex being the less-choosy.


Adaptations

The question of why it is the males who undergo pregnancy rather than the females is actually not entirely known, though some researchers believe male pregnancy allows for shorter birthing intervals, hence more offspring. When looking at which sex has the ability to produce more young if they had an unlimited number of ready and willing partners, males have the potential to produce 17 percent more in a breeding season. Also, females have “time-outs” from the reproductive cycle that are 1.2 times longer than those of males. This does not seem to be based on physiology, rather mate choice. When the female’s eggs are ready, she must lay them in a few hours or else she has to eject them onto the sea floor which is a huge cost to her physically, as her eggs amount to about a third of her body weight. To protect against unwillingly losing a clutch, the female demands a long courtship period. Furthermore, the daily greetings help to cement the bond between the pair. Another study conducted by Amanda Vincent of Project Seahorse shows the importance of this daily ritual. She kept a female in a tank with two males and when the female filled one male’s pouch with eggs he was then taken away, while she was left with the other male (the one not impregnated). During the weeks of her mate’s pregnancy, the female and her tankmate greeted each other daily, clinging to the same bit of grass and changing color, but according to Vincent did not display signs of serious courtship. When the original mate had given birth he was returned to the tank. The female then had a choice between him and the other tankmate. While both males expressed enthusiasm for her attention, even tail wrestling and whacking each other, in all six tests the female rejected her original mate and presented the next clutch of eggs to the tankmate that she had greeted each day. [12] The importance of the daily meeting is extremely high in maintaining their monogamous relationship. Although monogamy within species is not common, it does appear to exist for some. In this case, the mate-guarding hypothesis may be an explanation. This hypothesis states that “males remain with a single female because of ecological factors that make male parental care and protection of offspring especially advantageous.” [13] Because the rates of survival for newborn seahorses are so low, incubation is essential at the beginning stages of life. Though not proven, males could have taken on this role because of the time period in which it takes females to produce their eggs. If the males carry the offspring while the females gather the nutrients needed to produce new eggs (which is again, 1/3 of their body weight), then they can continually reproduce batch after batch together, depending on one another for efficiency in spreading both of their genes. In monogamy (Greek: monos = single/only and gamos = marriage) a person has only one spouse at a time (as opposed to polygamy). ... Faithfulness redirects here. ...


Pets

Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) at the New England Aquarium.
Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) at the New England Aquarium.

While many aquarium hobbyists will keep seahorses as pets, seahorses collected from the wild tend to fare poorly in a home aquarium. They will eat only live foods such as brine shrimp and are prone to stress in an aquarium, which lowers the efficiency of their immune systems and makes them susceptible to disease. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1819x1036, 693 KB) Seahorse (hippocampus erectus). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1819x1036, 693 KB) Seahorse (hippocampus erectus). ... The New England Aquarium is a major aquarium located in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... “Aquaria” redirects here. ... This article is about pastimes. ... For non-zoological information on this animal as a pet, see Sea-Monkey. ...


In recent years, however, captive breeding of seahorses has become increasingly widespread. These seahorses survive better in captivity, and they are less likely to carry diseases. These seahorses will eat mysis shrimp, and they do not experience the shock and stress of being taken out of the wild and placed in a small aquarium. Although captive-bred seahorses are more expensive, they survive better than wild seahorses, and take no toll on wild populations. Captive breeding is the process of breeding endangered animals by capturing them from their natural environment, breeding them in restricted conditions in zoos and other conservation facilities, and releasing them back to the wild when the population stabilizes and the threat to the animal in the wild is lessened or...


Seahorses should be kept in an aquarium to themselves, or with compatible tank-mates. Seahorses are slow feeders, and in an aquarium with fast, aggressive feeders, the seahorses will be edged out in the competition for food. Special care should be given to ensure that all individuals obtain enough food at feeding times.


Seahorses can co-exist with many species of shrimp and other bottom-feeding creatures. Fish from the goby family also make good tank-mates. Some species are especially dangerous to the slow-moving seahorses and should be avoided completely: eels, tangs, triggerfish, squid, octopus, and sea anemones. Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Subfamilies Amblyopinae Gobiinae Gobionellinae Oxudercinae Sicydiinae See also list of Gobiidae genera The gobies form the family Gobiidae, which is one of the largest families of fish, with more than 2,000 species in more than 200 genera. ... For other uses, see Eel (disambiguation). ... Species Zebrasoma desjardinii Zebrasoma flavescens Zebrasoma gemmatum Zebrasoma rostratum Zebrasoma scopas Zebrasoma veliferum Zebrasoma xanthurum Tangs are a kind of saltwater fish which inhabit shallow reefs and beds of seagrass from the east coast of Africa northward to the Red Sea, over the broad span of the Atlantic, Indo-Pacific... Genera See text. ... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Octopus (disambiguation). ... Families Many, see text. ...


Animals sold as "freshwater seahorses" are usually the closely related pipefish, of which a few species live in the lower reaches of rivers. The supposed true "freshwater seahorse" called Hippocampus aimei was not a real species, but a name sometimes used for individuals of Barbour's seahorse and Hedgehog seahorse. The latter is a species commonly found in brackish waters, but not actually a freshwater fish. Fresh water redirects here. ... Genera See text. ... Binomial name Jordan & Richardson, 1908 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 Hippocampus histrix Kaup, 1853 [mistaken identity] Barbours seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Weber, 1913 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 The hedgehog seahorse (Hippocampus spinosissimus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Brackish water is water that is saltier than fresh water, but not as salty as sea water. ...


Use in Chinese medicine

Medicinal seahorse.
Medicinal seahorse.

Seahorse populations have been endangered in recent years by overfishing. Therefore, seahorse fishing is strictly illegal.[where?] The seahorse is used in traditional Chinese herbology, and as many as 20 million seahorses may be caught each year and sold for this purpose.[14] Medicinal seahorses are not readily bred in captivity as they are susceptible to disease and have somewhat different energetics than aquarium seahorses. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 411 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Note: this edit is a sharpened version of Image:Seahorse Skeleton Macro 8. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 411 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Note: this edit is a sharpened version of Image:Seahorse Skeleton Macro 8. ... The Siberian Tiger is a subspecies of tiger that are critically endangered. ... Chinese materia medica (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the common name of Chinese materia medica subject. ...


Import and export of seahorses has been controlled under CITES since May 15, 2004. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement between Governments, drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of the World Conservation Union (IUCN). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The problem may be exacerbated by the growth of pills and capsules as the preferred method of ingesting medication as they are cheaper and more available than traditional, individually tailored prescriptions of raw medicinals but the contents are harder to track. Seahorses once had to be of a certain size and quality before they were accepted by TCM practitioners and consumers. But declining availability of the preferred large, pale and smooth seahorses has been offset by the shift towards prepackaged medicines, which make it possible for TCM merchants to sell previously unused juvenile, spiny and dark-coloured animals. Today almost a third of the seahorses sold in China are prepackaged. This adds to the pressure on the species.[15] Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ...


Philippine luminous seahorse sanctuary

Getafe, Jandayan Island off Bohol is a marine sanctuary, since 1995 to the luminous seahorses swimming among corals in the dark waters. On December 9, 2007, the sanctuary was awarded the most outstanding marine protected area (MPA) in the Philippines by the MPA Support Network (MSN), a multisectoral alliance of organizations seeking to protect the marine environment. The 50-hectare Handumon marine sanctuary is part of a large barrier reef in the waters of Bohol, teeming with fish, seashells and thick mangroves. The Haribon Foundation set up a Project Seahorse Foundation in Handumon to protect seahorses.[16] For the island see Bohol Island. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Above and below water view at the edge of the mangal Mangroves are woody trees or shrubs that grow in mangrove habitats or mangal (Hogarth, 1999). ... The Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of Natural Resources, simply known as Haribon Foundation, is a membership organization dedicated to the conservation of Philippine biodiversity. ...


Species

'Fucus like seahorse' from Lydekker's The Royal Natural History
'Fucus like seahorse' from Lydekker's The Royal Natural History
  • Genus Hippocampus
    • Big-belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis Lesson, 1827 (New Zealand and south and east Australia)
    • Winged seahorse, Hippocampus alatus Kuiter, 2001
    • West African seahorse, Hippocampus algiricus Kaup, 1856
    • Narrow-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus angustus Günther, 1870
    • Barbour's seahorse, Hippocampus barbouri Jordan & Richardson, 1908
    • Pygmy seahorse, Hippocampus bargibanti Whitley, 1970 (West Pacific area (Indonesia, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, etc)
    • False-eyed seahorse, Hippocampus biocellatus Kuiter, 2001
    • Réunion seahorse, Hippocampus borboniensis Duméril, 1870
    • Short-head seahorse or knobby seahorse, Hippocampus breviceps Peters, 1869 (south and east Australia)
    • Giraffe seahorse, Hippocampus camelopardalis Bianconi, 1854
    • Knysna seahorse, Hippocampus capensis Boulenger, 1900
    • Hippocampus colemani Kuiter, 2003
    • Tiger tail seahorse, Hippocampus comes Cantor, 1850
    • Crowned seahorse, Hippocampus coronatus Temminck & Schlegel, 1850
    • Denise's pygmy seahorse, Hippocampus denise Lourie & Randall, 2003
    • Lined seahorse, Hippocampus erectus Perry, 1810 (east coast of the Americas, between Nova Scotia and Uruguay)
    • Fisher's seahorse, Hippocampus fisheri Jordan & Evermann, 1903
    • Sea pony, Hippocampus fuscus Rüppell, 1838 (Indian Ocean)
    • Big-head seahorse, Hippocampus grandiceps Kuiter, 2001
    • Long-snouted seahorse, Hippocampus guttulatus Cuvier, 1829
    • Eastern spiny seahorse, Hippocampus hendriki Kuiter, 2001
    • Short-snouted seahorse, Hippocampus hippocampus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean)
    • Thorny seahorse, Hippocampus histrix Kaup, 1856 (Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and the Far East)
    • Pacific seahorse, Hippocampus ingens Girard, 1858 (Pacific coast of North, Central and South America)
    • Jayakar's seahorse, Hippocampus jayakari Boulenger, 1900
    • Collared seahorse, Hippocampus jugumus Kuiter, 2001
    • Great seahorse, Hippocampus kelloggi Jordan & Snyder, 1901
    • Spotted seahorse, Hippocampus kuda Bleeker, 1852
    • Lichtenstein's seahorse, Hippocampus lichtensteinii Kaup, 1856
    • Bullneck seahorse, Hippocampus minotaur Gomon, 1997
    • Japanese seahorse, Hippocampus mohnikei Bleeker, 1854
    • Monte Bello seahorse, Hippocampus montebelloensis Kuiter, 2001
    • Northern spiny seahorse, Hippocampus multispinus Kuiter, 2001
    • High-crown seahorse, Hippocampus procerus Kuiter, 2001
    • Queensland seahorse, Hippocampus queenslandicus Horne, 2001
    • Longsnout seahorse, Hippocampus reidi Ginsburg, 1933 (Caribbean coral reefs)
    • Half-spined seahorse, Hippocampus semispinosus Kuiter, 2001
    • Dhiho's seahorse, Hippocampus sindonis Jordan & Snyder, 1901
    • Hedgehog seahorse, Hippocampus spinosissimus Weber, 1913
    • West Australian seahorse, Hippocampus subelongatus Castelnau, 1873
    • Longnose seahorse, Hippocampus trimaculatus Leach, 1814
    • White's seahorse, Hippocampus whitei Bleeker, 1855 (east Australia)
    • Zebra seahorse, Hippocampus zebra Whitley, 1964
    • Dwarf seahorse, Hippocampus zosterae Jordan & Gilbert, 1882 (Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean)

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Richard Lydekker (1849 - April 16, 1915) was an English naturalist, geologist and writer of numerous books on natural history. ... Binomial name Hippocampus abdominalis Lesson, 1827 The big-belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, is a seahorse of the family Syngnathidae, found off southern Australia, and around New Zealand, from low tide level down to 100 m. ... Binomial name Hippocampus abdominalis Lesson, 1827 The big-belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, is a seahorse of the family Syngnathidae, found off southern Australia, and around New Zealand, from low tide level down to 100 m. ... Binomial name Kaup, 1856 The West African seahorse (Hippocampus algiricus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Kaup, 1856 The West African seahorse (Hippocampus algiricus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Günther, 1870 Synonyms Hippocampus erinaceus Günther, 1870 The narrow-bellied seahorse (Hippocampus angustus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Günther, 1870 Synonyms Hippocampus erinaceus Günther, 1870 The narrow-bellied seahorse (Hippocampus angustus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Jordan & Richardson, 1908 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 Hippocampus histrix Kaup, 1853 [mistaken identity] Barbours seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Jordan & Richardson, 1908 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 Hippocampus histrix Kaup, 1853 [mistaken identity] Barbours seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Hippocampus bargibanti Whitley, 1970 The pygmy seahorse, Hippocampus bargibanti, is a seahorse of the family Syngnathidae, found in western central Pacific. ... Binomial name Hippocampus bargibanti Whitley, 1970 The pygmy seahorse, Hippocampus bargibanti, is a seahorse of the family Syngnathidae in the western central Pacific. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Duméril, 1870) The Réunion seahorse (Hippocampus borboniensis) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Duméril, 1870) The Réunion seahorse (Hippocampus borboniensis) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Peters, 1869 The knobby seahorse, short-headed seahorse, or short-snouted seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bianconi, 1854 The giraffe seahorse (Hippocampus camelopardalis) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bianconi, 1854 The giraffe seahorse (Hippocampus camelopardalis) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Cantor, 1850 The tiger tail seahorse (Hippocampus comes) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Cantor, 1850 The tiger tail seahorse (Hippocampus comes) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Temminck & Schlegel, 1850 The crowned seahorse (Hippocampus coronatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Temminck & Schlegel, 1850 The crowned seahorse (Hippocampus coronatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Lourie & Randall, 2003 Denises pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus denise) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Lourie & Randall, 2003 Denises pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus denise) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Motto: Munit Hae et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Largest metro Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto), French Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate... Binomial name Jordan & Evermann, 1903 Fishers seahorse (Hippocampus fisheri) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Jordan & Evermann, 1903 Fishers seahorse (Hippocampus fisheri) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Rüppell, 1838 Synonyms Hippocampus brachyrhynchus Duncker, 1914 The sea pony (Hippocampus fuscus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Rüppell, 1838 Synonyms Hippocampus brachyrhynchus Duncker, 1914 The sea pony (Hippocampus fuscus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Cuvier, 1829 Synonyms Hippocampus longirostris Schinz, 1822 Hippocampus ramulosus Leach in Shaw & Nodder, 1814 The long-snouted seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Cuvier, 1829 Synonyms Hippocampus longirostris Schinz, 1822 Hippocampus ramulosus Leach in Shaw & Nodder, 1814 The long-snouted seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Peters, 1869 The knobby seahorse, short-headed seahorse, or short-snouted seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... This article is about the Asian regions. ... Binomial name (Girard, 1859) The Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Girard, 1859) The Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Binomial name Boulenger, 1900 Jayakars seahorse (Hippocampus jayakari) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Boulenger, 1900 Jayakars seahorse (Hippocampus jayakari) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Jordan & Snyder, 1902 The great seahorse, Kelloggs seahorse, or offshore seahorse (Hippocampus kelloggi) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Jordan & Snyder, 1902 The great seahorse, Kelloggs seahorse, or offshore seahorse (Hippocampus kelloggi) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Bleeker, 1852) Synonyms Hippocampus horai Duncker, 1926 Hippocampus novaehebudorum Fowler, 1944 Hippocampus taeniops Fowler, 1904 The common seahorse, estuary seahorse, spotted seahorse, or yellow seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Bleeker, 1852) Synonyms Hippocampus horai Duncker, 1926 Hippocampus novaehebudorum Fowler, 1944 Hippocampus taeniops Fowler, 1904 The common seahorse, estuary seahorse, spotted seahorse, or yellow seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Kaup, 1856 Lichtensteins seahorse (Hippocampus lichtensteinii) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Gomon, 1997 The bullneck seahorse (Hippocampus minotaur) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Gomon, 1997 The bullneck seahorse (Hippocampus minotaur) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bleeker, 1854 Synonyms Hippocampus japonicus Kaup, 1853 The Japanese seahorse or lemur-tail seahorse (Hippocampus mohnikei) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bleeker, 1854 Synonyms Hippocampus japonicus Kaup, 1853 The Japanese seahorse or lemur-tail seahorse (Hippocampus mohnikei) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Ginsburg, 1933 The longsnout seahorse or slender seahorse (Hippocampus reidi) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Ginsburg, 1933 The longsnout seahorse or slender seahorse (Hippocampus reidi) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Binomial name (Jordan & Snyder, 1902) Shihos seahorse (Hippocampus sindonis) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Weber, 1913 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 The hedgehog seahorse (Hippocampus spinosissimus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Weber, 1913 Synonyms Hippocampus aimei Roule, 1916 The hedgehog seahorse (Hippocampus spinosissimus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Castelnau, 1873 Synonyms Hippocampus angustus Günther, 1870 The tiger snout seahorse or West Australian seahorse (Hippocampus subelongatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Castelnau, 1873 Synonyms Hippocampus angustus Günther, 1870 The tiger snout seahorse or West Australian seahorse (Hippocampus subelongatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Leach, 1814) Synonyms Hippocampus planifrons Peters, 1877 Hippocampus raji Whitley, 1955 Hippocampus takakurae Tanaka, 1916 The flat-faced seahorse, low-crowned seahorse, or three-spot seahorse (Hippocampus trimaculatus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bleeker, 1855 The New Holland seahorse, Sydney seahorse, or Whites seahorse (Hippocampus whitei) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Bleeker, 1855 The New Holland seahorse, Sydney seahorse, or Whites seahorse (Hippocampus whitei) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Whitley, 1964 The zebra seahorse (Hippocampus zebra) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name Whitley, 1964 The zebra seahorse (Hippocampus zebra) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882) The dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Binomial name (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882) The dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae family. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... West Indies redirects here. ...

Cultural references

A sculpture of a heraldic seahorse that adorned an 18th or 19th century French naval vessel
A sculpture of a heraldic seahorse that adorned an 18th or 19th century French naval vessel

In heraldry, a seahorse is depicted as a creature with the foreparts of a horse and the hindparts of a fish. See, for example, the right supporter of the Isle of Wight Arms, the supporters on either side of the crest of the city of Newcastle upon Tyne, or the coincidental arms of the University of Newcastle, Australia. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1651 KB)A sculpture of a heraldic depicition of a seahorse, by unknown 19th or 18th century French artist, showcased at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia, photographed by DONeil. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1651 KB)A sculpture of a heraldic depicition of a seahorse, by unknown 19th or 18th century French artist, showcased at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia, photographed by DONeil. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The arms of the Isle of Wight were granted in 1938, with the inscription: ALL THIS BEAUTY IS OF GOD the shield detail is used on the Flag At the centre of the shield is Carisbrooke Castle the historical seat of many former governors of the island. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Newcastle is a public university located in Callaghan, a suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales. ...


The seahorse is prominent in the logo of Waterford Crystal and the logotype of illustrator W. W. Denslow. The world-famous Waterford Crystal Ball is lowered in Times Square, New York City, on New Years Eve Waterford Crystal is a trademark brand of crystal glassware produced in Waterford, Ireland, by the company Waterford Wedgwood plc. ... Categories: Stub | Oz ...


In the Seri culture of northwestern Mexico, the legend is that the seahorse is a person who, to escape his pursuers, fled into the sea, placing his sandals in his waistbelt at his back.[17] SERI is an abbreviation of Samsung Economic Research Institute in South Korea. ...


The National Society for Epilepsy has a seahorse for its mascot named Caesar (after the Roman emperor, Julius Caesar, who was believed to have had epilepsy). The seahorse mascot was chosen because the hippocampus, a part of the brain that is resistant to damage from epileptic seizures, resembles a seahorse in shape. The National Society for Epilepsy (NSE) is the largest medical charity in the field of epilepsy in the UK, providing services for people with epilepsy for over 100 years. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hippocampus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ...


In the Hawaiian culture the seahorse has long be a sign of eternal friendship.


Gallery

Notes

  1. ^ "Hippocampus". FishBase. Ed. Ranier Froese and Daniel Pauly. May 2006 version. N.p.: FishBase, 2006.
  2. ^ BBC News - Rare seahorses breeding in Thames
  3. ^ NOVA Online | Kingdom of the Seahorse
  4. ^ Pregnant—and Still Macho - seahorses | Science News | Find Articles at BNET.com
  5. ^ The biology of seahorses: Reproduction. The Seahorse Project. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  6. ^ Sex and the seahorse - Science, News - Independent.co.uk
  7. ^ Pregnant—and Still Macho - seahorses | Science News | Find Articles at BNET.com
  8. ^ Seahorse Fathers Take Reins in Childbirth
  9. ^ Pregnant—and Still Macho - seahorses | Science News | Find Articles at BNET.com
  10. ^ Seahorse Fathers Take Reins in Childbirth
  11. ^ Pregnant—and Still Macho - seahorses | Science News | Find Articles at BNET.com
  12. ^ Pregnant—and Still Macho - seahorses | Science News | Find Articles at BNET.com
  13. ^ Alcock, John. (2005). Animal Behavior: 8th Edition. (pp. 370-371).Massachusetts:Sinauer.
  14. ^ "Seahorse Crusader Amanda Vincent" on Nova television show
  15. ^ Project Seahorse | Can we tame wild medicine?
  16. ^ Inquirer.net, Seahorse sanctuary in Bohol judged the best in RP
  17. ^ http://lengamer.org/admin/language_folders/seri/user_uploaded_files/links/File/Textos/Hipocampo/Hipocampo_Metadata.htm

FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Amanda C.J. Vincent and Laila M. Sadler. "Faithful pair bonds in wild seahorse, Hippocampus whitei." Animal Behaviour 50(1995): 1557-1569.
  • Amanda C.J. Vincent. "A role for daily greetings in maintaining seahorse pair bonds." Animal Behaviour 49 (1995): 258-260.
  • Amanda C.J. Vincent. "A seahorse father makes a good mother." Natural History, 12 (1990): 34-43.
  • Ananda C.J. Vincent and Rosie Woodroffe. "Mothers little helpers: patterns of male care in mammals." Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 9 (1994): 294-297.
  • Sara A. Lourie, Amanda C.J. Vincent and Heather J. Hall: Seahorses: An Identification Guide to the World's Species and their Conversation. London: Project Seahorse, 1999
  • John Sparks: Battle of the Sexes: The Natural History of Sex. London: BBC Books, 1999

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