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Encyclopedia > Sea breeze
A: Sea breeze, B: Land breeze
A: Sea breeze, B: Land breeze
Lake - Sea breeze and atmospheric depth

A sea-breeze (or onshore breeze) is a wind from the sea that develops over land near coasts. It is formed by increasing temperature differences between the land and water which create a pressure minimum over the land due to its relative warmth and forces higher pressure, cooler air from the sea to move inland. For other uses, see Sea Breeze. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (689x755, 57 KB) Title es: La formación de las brisas. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (689x755, 57 KB) Title es: La formación de las brisas. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1100x800, 30 KB) Author: Vaughan Weather Date: November 6th, 2006 Lake - Sea breeze chart. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1100x800, 30 KB) Author: Vaughan Weather Date: November 6th, 2006 Lake - Sea breeze chart. ...

Contents

Main cause

The sea is warmed by the sun to a greater depth than the land due to its greater specific heat.[1] The sea therefore has a greater capacity for absorbing heat than does the land and so the surface of the sea warms up more slowly than the land's surface. As the temperature of the surface of the land rises, the land heats the air above it. The warm air is less dense and so it rises. This rising air over the land lowers the sea level pressure by about 0.2%. The cooler air above the sea, now with relatively higher sea level pressure, flows towards the land into the lower pressure, creating a cooler breeze near the coast. The strength of the sea breeze is directly proportional to the temperature difference between the land and the sea. If the environmental wind field is greater than 8 knots and opposing the direction of a possible sea breeze, the sea breeze is not likely to develop.[2] Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... The specific heat capacity (symbol c or s, also called specific heat) of a substance is defined as heat capacity per unit mass. ... A landform comprises a geomorphological unit, and is largely defined by its surface form and location in the landscape, as part of the terrain, and as such, is typically an element of topography. ... Atmospheric pressure is the pressure caused by the weight of air above any area in the Earths atmosphere. ...


Effects

Schematic cross section through a sea breeze front. If the air inland is moist, cumulus often marks the front.

A sea-breeze front is a weather front created by a sea-breeze, also known as a convergence zone. The cold air from the sea meets the warmer air from the land and creates a boundary like a shallow cold front. When powerful this front creates cumulus clouds, and if the air is humid and unstable, cumulonimbus clouds, the front can sometimes trigger thunderstorms. If the flow aloft is aligned with the direction of the sea breeze, places experiencing the sea breeze frontal passage will be benign, or fair, weather for the remainder of the day. At the front warm air continues to flow upward and cold air continually moves in to replace it and so the front moves progressively inland. Its speed depends on whether it is assisted or hampered by the prevailing wind, and the strength of the thermal contrast between land and sea. At night, the sea-breeze usually vanishes. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A guide to the symbols for weather fronts that may be found on a weather map: 1. ... Convergence zone usually refers to a region in the atmosphere where two prevailing flows meet and interact, usually resulting in distinctive weather conditions. ... In meteorology, a weather front is a boundary between two air masses with differing characteristics (e. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Humidity is the quantity of moisture in the air. ... Instability in systems is generally characterized by some of the outputs or internal states growing without bounds. ... Cumulonimbus (Cb) is a type of cloud that is tall, dense, and involved in thunderstorms and other intense weather. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ...


Sea-breezes in Florida

Sea breeze convergence in Cuba. Note the northern sea breeze meets with the southern coasts' seabreeze, leading to a sharp convergence line in the cumulus field.

Thunderstorms caused by powerful sea breeze fronts frequently occur in Florida, a peninsula surrounded on both the east and west by the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, respectively. No matter which direction the winds are blowing, they are always off the water, thus making Florida the place most often struck by lightning in the United States, and one of the most on Earth. On especially calm days with little prevailing wind, sea-breezes from both coasts may collide in the middle, creating especially severe storms down the center of the state. These storms also tend to produce significant hail due to the tremendous uplift it causes in the atmosphere. In Florida, a sea-breeze pushed by prevailing winds may also continue past the land and out over the water at night, creating spectacular cloud-to-cloud lightning shows for hours after sunset. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... Look up preston in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Air redirects here. ...


Land breezes

At night, the land cools off quicker than the ocean due to differences in their specific heat values, which forces the dying of the daytime sea breeze. If the land cools below that of the adjacent sea surface temperature, the pressure over the water will be lower than that of the land, setting up a land breeze as long as the environmental surface wind pattern is not strong enough to oppose it. If there is sufficient moisture and instability available, the land breeze can cause showers or even thunderstorms, over the water. Overnight thunderstorm development offshore can be a good predictor for the activity on land the following day, as long as there are no expected changes to the weather pattern over the following 12-24 hours. The land breeze will die once the land warms up again the next morning. The specific heat capacity (symbol c or s, also called specific heat) of a substance is defined as heat capacity per unit mass. ... Annual mean sea surface temperature for the World Ocean. ...


See Also

For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ University of Wisconsin. Sea and Land Breezes. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  2. ^ JetStream: An Online School For Weather. The Sea Breeze. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.

External sites


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sea and Land Breezes (1158 words)
On the rugged Greek coast, such conclusions as to the relative strength of the land and sea breezes are quite justifiable due to the enhancement of the land breeze and weakening of the sea breeze by the seaward slope of the land.
In general, however, the sea breeze is the stronger of the two winds especially among those tropical coasts flanked by cold ocean currents, for the sea breeze is a true child of the sun.
The landward penetration of the sea breeze reaches 15 to 50 kilometres (9 to 30 miles) in the temperate zones and 50 to 65 kilometres (30 to 40 miles) in the tropics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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