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Encyclopedia > Scuttling
German battlecruiser Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow.
German battlecruiser Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow.

Scuttling is the act of deliberately sinking a ship, either to dispose of an old vessel or to prevent the vehicle from being captured by an enemy force. This is done by allowing water to flow into the hull of the ship, which can be achieved in several ways. Pumps or hatches can be used, or holes may be ripped into the hull with brute force. SMS Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow in 1919 This image was scanned from a public domain text by the Great War Primary Documents Archive and is made available by them for any purpose provided that they are credited and a link is given to the Photos of the Great War... SMS Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow in 1919 This image was scanned from a public domain text by the Great War Primary Documents Archive and is made available by them for any purpose provided that they are credited and a link is given to the Photos of the Great War... Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft, sometimes with multiple decks. ... Manual pump used to obtain water A pump is a mechanical device used to move liquids or gases. ... Hatch may refer to: Common nickname for gentlemen named Prachet Hatch, Utah Hatch, New Mexico Orrin Hatch Richard Hatch A hatch (door) is a door in a floor or ceiling. ...

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Historical examples

German fleet at Scapa Flow

In 1919, the warships of the German High Seas Fleet were scuttled by their crews at Scapa Flow to prevent the ships falling into British hands. The seabed of Scapa Flow is still littered with the warships, making the area very popular amongst undersea diving enthusiasts. 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... German battlecruiser Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow. ... Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. ...


The Bismarck

In 1941, the Bismarck, heavily damaged by the Royal Navy, leaking fuel and rendered mostly unmanoeuvrable, but her hull still sound and well afloat, was scuttled under fire by her crew to avoid capture. The German battleship Bismarck was probably the most famous warship of the Second World War. ...


French fleet in Toulon

In 1942, Nazi Germany invaded the so-called "Free zone" to retaliate against the Allied landing in North Africa. On the 27 November, they reached Toulon, where the most of the French Navy was anchored. To avoid capture by the Nazis, the French admirals-in-command (Laborde and Marquis) decided to scuttle the 230000 tonne fleet, comprising some of the most advanced units of the time (the Dunkerque and the admiral ship Strasbourg, notably). 80% of the fleet was utterly destroyed; all of the capital ships proving impossible to repair. Legally, the scuttling of the fleet was allowed under the terms of the 1940 Armistice with Germany. This article is about the year. ... Presidential flag of Vichy France Vichy France, or the Vichy regime was the de facto French government of 1940-1944 during the Nazi Germany occupation of World War II. Now known in French as the Régime de Vichy or Vichy, during its existence it referred to itself as L... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... Location within France Coat of Arms of Toulon Toulon (Tolon in Provençal) is a city in southern France and a large military harbor on the Mediterranean coast, with a major French naval base. ... The French Navy (Marine Nationale) is the naval arm of the French military and is the second-largest Western European navy (the largest being the United Kingdoms Royal Navy). ... The Dunkerque was the first of a new type of warship of the French Navy, labeled as fast battleship. Larger and more powerful than a mere battlecruiser, yet not a full battleship, they were designed to counter the threat of the German Pocket battleships. ... The Strasbourg was a warship of the French Navy, labeled as fast battleship. Larger and more powerful than a mere battlecruiser, yet not a full battleship, they were designed to counter the threat of the German Pocket battleships. ...


Landing in Normandy, 1944

Old ships called 'block ships' or 'corn cobs' were sunk to form a protective reef for Mulberry Harbour at Arromanches for the Normandy landings. The scuttled ships were called Gooseberries and protected the harbor so transport ships could unload without being hampered by waves. Remains of Mulberry B at Arromanches A Mulberry Harbour was a type of temporary harbour developed in World War II to offload cargo on a beach during the Allied invasion of Normandy. ... Arromanches-les-Bains or simply Arromanches is a town in Normandy, France, located on the coast in the heart of the area where the Normandy landings took place on D_Day, on June 6, 1944. ... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... Remains of Mulberry B at Arromanches A Mulberry Harbour was a type of temporary harbour developed in World War II to offload cargo on a beach during the Allied invasion of Normandy. ...


Hérnan Cortés, 1519

Hernán Cortés, the famed explorer who is renowned for his aggressive campaigns against the Aztec people, ordered his men to scuttle his ships, so as to motivate them to perform their tasks in the New World seriously (ie: collect treasure and earn 'glory' for Spain and Cortés, a task he saw as more attainable if his men didn't have an easy 'escape route' back to Spain). Hernán Cortés Hernán(do) Cortés, marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who conquered Mexico for Spain. ...


Modern times

Instead of scuttling, many vessels are recycled today. However, some ships (and other objects of similar size) are sometimes sunk in order to help the formation of reefs. It is also common for military organizations to use old ships for target practice and in war games, or for various other experiments. As an example, the former USS America aircraft carrier was destroyed and sunk in 2005 to help understand how vessels of such large size react to bombardment. The research will be used in the design of future ships.   The international symbol for recycling. ... A reef surrounding an islet. ... Target practice refers to any exercise (often military) in which projectiles are fired at a specified target, usually to improve the aim of the person or persons firing the weapon. ... The Book War Game is a childrens book about World War I. Written by Michael Foreman in 1993, the story describes a group of four young men (Will,Freddie,Billy, and Lacey) who are eager to go for the grand adventure. The story goes from training in England, to... The third USS America (CV-66), originally CVA-66, was a supercarrier of the United States Navy that served from 1965 to 1996. ... An aircraft carrier is a warship whose main role is to deploy and recover aircraft—in effect acting as a sea-going airbase. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Look up scuttle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

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