FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Scripps College
Scripps College
Scripps College Logo

Motto: Incipit Vita Nova ("Here Begins New Life")
Established: 1926
Type: Private
President: Fritz Weis (Interim)
Faculty: 95
Undergraduates: 878
Postgraduates: 21
Location: Claremont, CA, USA
Campus: Suburban, 30 acres (0.12 km²)
Endowment: US$265+ million as of June 2007
Mascot: Athenas
Website: www.scrippscollege.edu

Scripps College is a liberal arts women's college in Claremont, California, United States. It is a member of the Claremont Colleges. TSRIs Beckman Center for Chemical Sciences The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is a medical research facility that focuses on research in the basic biomedical sciences. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Claremont is a college town community in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Claremont is a college town community in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of five undergraduate and two graduate schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ...

Contents

History

Scripps was founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps, who believed that "the primary obligation of a college is to educate students to be clear and independent thinkers and to live their lives with confidence, courage and hope." The motto of the college is "Incipit Vita Nova" ("Here begins new life") from Dante's New Life. Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ellen Browning Scripps in the arcade of her La Jolla home Ellen Browning Scripps (October 18, 1836–August 3, 1932) philanthropist // Biography Scripps was born in 1836 in London to James Mogg Scripps and Ellen Mary (Saunders) Scripps. ... Dante redirects here. ...


Academics

The Claremont Colleges

Scripps is a member of the Claremont Colleges, and much of student life revolves around the five colleges, or "5C's." Scripps College, Claremont McKenna College, Pomona College, Pitzer College and Harvey Mudd College all interact socially, but also share dining halls, libraries, and other facilities spread throughout the bordering campuses. All five colleges are part of the Claremont University Consortium. The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of five undergraduate and two graduate schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ... A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. ... Pitzer College is a small, highly selective, private residential liberal arts college located in Claremont, California, a college town approximately 30 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. ... Harvey Mudd College is a highly selective, private college of science, engineering, and mathematics, located in Claremont, California. ... The Claremont University Consortium administers the Claremont Colleges system in Claremont, California. ...


Any student attending Scripps can enroll in up to 2/3 of their classes at the other four colleges, and can also major at any of the other four, so long as the student's requested major is not offered at Scripps. This is the general academic policy at all five schools, and is meant to give students the resources of a larger university while still maintaining the qualities of a small, liberal-arts college.


Over the years, a rivalry has formed between the opposing sports teams CMS (Claremont-Mudd-Scripps) and PP (Pomona-Pitzer).


Rank & Curriculum

Scripps was ranked 28th nationally among liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report as of 2008, and 4th, nationally, in terms of women's colleges; above Mount Holyoke and Barnard College, both of which have been considered top women's colleges in the United States. Mount Holyoke (elevation 940/286m) is the western-most peak of the Mt. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ...


Academics are focused on interdisciplinary humanistic studies, combined with rigorous training in the disciplines. General requirements include classes in fine arts, letters, natural sciences, social sciences, women's/gender studies and race/ethnic studies. Scripps also requires first-year students to take a writing course. Each graduating student must complete a senior thesis or project. It shares several academic programs with other members of the Claremont Consortium, including the Joint Science Department and the Joint Music Department.


A key part of the Scripps experience is the Core curriculum, a sequence of three classes that encourage students to think critically and challenge ideas. Every first-year student takes Core I in the fall, which introduces students to major ideas that shape the modern world. Core II seminars focus on specific ideas introduced in Core I and are team-taught by two professors in different fields, such as physics and art. The concluding Core III classes encourage discussion and critical thinking for first-semester sophomores, culminating in individual projects.


Newsweek-Kaplan picked 25 colleges as “the places that everyone’s talking about for 2006.” Amongst them, Scripps was named the “Hottest Women’s College”. Newsweek heralded Scripps’ academic strengths as well as its physical location and campus amenities.

It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... This article is about the social science. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... Studio art is made of art and studio, and the term has several implications depending on the context used. ... // Introduction Asian American Studies is an academic discipline which studies the experience of people of Asian ancestory in America. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Biology (disambiguation). ... Biochemistry is the chemistry of life. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Chicano studies is an academic discipline. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Environmental studies is the systematic study of human interaction with their environment. ... European studies is a field of study offered by many academic colleges and universities that focuses on the current development of European integration. ... Film theory seeks to develop concise, systematic concepts that apply to the study of film/cinema as art. ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Gender studies is a field of interdisciplinary study which analyzes the phenomenon of gender. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language and literature in both its historic and present forms. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... For other uses, see History (disambiguation). ... Human biology is an interdisciplinary academic field of biology, biological anthropology, and medicine which focuses on humans; it is closely related to primate biology, and a number of other fields. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... Latin American Studies (sometimes abbreviated LAS) is an academic discipline which studies the history and experience of peoples and cultures in the Americas. ... A pre-law degree is one preparing for law school. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Media Studies is the study of the constitution and effects of media. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... Organizational studies, organizational behavior, and organizational theory are related terms for the academic study of organizations, examining them using the methods of economics, sociology, political science, anthropology, communication studies, and psychology. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... Russian ( , transliteration: , Russian pronunciation: ) is the most geographically widespread language of Eurasia, the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages, and the largest native language in Europe. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... Jewish studies also known as Judaic studies is a subject area of study available at many colleges and universities in the Western World. ... Queer studies is the study of issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... The music industry refers to the business industry connected with the creation and sale of music. ...

Campus

A view of the tree-filled campus of Scripps College
A view of the tree-filled campus of Scripps College

The 30-acre campus, designed by the pioneering architect Gordon Kaufmann in the Mediterranean Revival Style architecture he was known for, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Scripps College is also known for its handsome landscaping designed by Edward Huntsman-Trout. Sumner Hunt designed Janet Jacks Balch Hall. Image File history File linksMetadata Scripps_campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Scripps_campus. ... Gordon Kaufmann was an American architect mostly known for his work on the Hoover Dam. ... The River Terrace Apartments in Santa Clara, California represent a modern interpretation of the Mediterranean Revival Style. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Scripps has a lush, well-manicured campus. A rose garden between Toll and Browning Halls is designated for student cutting, and many women keep fresh-cut roses in their rooms. Fruit trees abound on the campus, and include orange (lining most paths near the residence halls), grapefruit (especially near the Claremont McKenna College campus), pomegranate (in the courtyards of Grace Hall and outside Dorsey Hall), kumquat (in Olive Court and outside the administration offices of Balch Hall), and loquat (in front of Toll Hall). Olive trees are found throughout the entire campus, particularly in Humanities courtyard. Some strawberries can also be found in the Rose Garden. Scents of orange blossoms and wisteria perfume the campus in the early spring. Elm Tree Lawn, located near Revelle House (formerly the President's House, but presently houses the Alumnae Association), has long been the site of Commencement ceremonies. A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ...


Several facilities are shared by the members of the Claremont Consortium including Honnold/Mudd Library and the Keck Science Center. The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of five undergraduate and two graduate schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ...


Central to the Scripps campus is the student-run coffeeshop, the Motley Coffeehouse (commonly called the Motley). Located in Seal Court near the mailroom and Malott Commons dining hall, the Motley is a socially- and environmentally-conscious business that provides students with a venue for events and concerts as well providing space to study, hang out, and drink fair trade espresso. The Motley prides itself on being the only all-women, undergraduate, student-run coffeehouse "west of the Mississippi."[1] For the product certification system ( ), see Fairtrade certification. ...


Scripps College is also the home of the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, which maintains Scripps College's permanent art collection of some 7500 objects spanning 3000 years of art history. [2] Objects are available for use in classes, displayed in campus exhibitions, and loaned to other exhibiting institutions. Among the holdings in the collection are works by American artists Winslow Homer, Childe Hassam, and John James Audubon, and an extensive collection of paintings by the California artist Millard Sheets. Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Frederick Childe Hassam (October 17, 1859 - August 27, 1935) was an American Impressionist painter. ... John James Audubon (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was an American ornithologist, naturalist, hunter, and painter. ... Millard Owen Sheets (1907-1989) was a American painter and an important representative of the California School of painting. ...


Residential life

Most Scripps students live in one of the nine residence halls or apartments:

  • Eleanor Joy Toll Hall ("Toll"), 1927 - Toll Hall was the first building on campus and served not only as the student residence in the first few years of the College, but also housed the administration, faculty offices and classrooms.
  • Grace Scripps Clark Hall (officially known as "Clark", but more popularly known as "Grace"), 1928
  • Ellen Browning Hall ("Browning"), 1929 - Named after the Founder of the College
  • Susan Miller Dorsey Hall ("Dorsey"), 1930
  • Mary Kimberly Hall ("Kimberly" or "Kimbo"), 1960, was built originally for female Harvey Mudd students and is thus architecturally different from all other halls.
  • Cecil & Bessie Bartlett Frankel Hall ("Frankel"), 1966
  • Mary Routt Hall ("Routt"), 1966
  • Senior Routt Apartments
  • Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Hall ("GJW" or "GJ-Dub"), 2000
  • Wilbur Hall, 2001 - Built in a former dining hall attached to Kimberly Hall

Year levels are mixed in each dorm, with first-year through senior students living side-by-side. However, the present-day hall draw system (which is based on the year a student entered college) has contributed to older students congregating in what are widely considered more desirable locations (usually based on aesthetics and room sizes, among other factors), such as Dorsey, Browning and Jungels-Winkler Halls. All of the residence halls have courtyards and fountains, as well as reading rooms, television rooms, kitchens, and living rooms. Many of the rooms have balconies.


In 2006, The Princeton Review included Scripps in several of their rankings, such as "Dorms Like Palaces" (#4), "Most Beautiful Campus" (#17), and "Best Campus Food" (#19). [3] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


Traditions and lore

  • Scripps has its own font ("Goudy Scripps") and a printing press, as well as its own color ("Scripps Green"), a sage green that is used liberally across the campus, from doors in the residence halls, to the velvet seats in Boone Recital Hall, to the caps and gowns worn at Commencement. The color was chosen to be reminiscent of the sagebrush originally covering the ground upon which the campus was built. Goudy Scripps font is often seen in Denison Library, though is seldom used in college publications.
  • There are only two times a Scripps student may pass through the wooden front doors of Denison Library: during Matriculation, in which first-year students enter the doors and sign a handmade book, symbolically entering the college; and during Commencement, as graduating seniors exit the doors before the start of the Commencement ceremony.
  • In the late fifties and early sixties, following the founding of nearby Harvey Mudd College, first-year students were taken to the Mudd campus during orientation to sing to the incoming Mudders. This song was sung to the tune of "You Are My Sunshine":
Girls can never change their natures, that is far beyond their reach
Once a girl is born a lemon, she can never be a peach.
But the law of compensation is the one we always preach:
You can always squeeze a lemon, but just try and squeeze a peach.
  • Each residence hall houses a study, known as a "Browsing Room". Small libraries are maintained in each Browsing Room through generous alumnae donations to a specific Browsing Room fund, in addition to donations of used books from hall residents. A longstanding tradition "prohibits" men from entering Browsing Rooms as they are designated for study, not socializing.
  • Since the early days of the College, students have referred to one another as "Scrippsies." In recent years, however, this term has become one of derision for some, and many students prefer to be called "Scripps Women," or the gender-neutral "Scripps students." Nonetheless, "Scrippsies" remains in use by many.
  • Each graduating class may paint a section of Graffiti Wall, located in the Rose Garden. Most classes vote on a design and each graduating student has the opportunity to sign her name to the wall. In recent years, older designs have undergone restoration after decades of exposure to the elements.

Athletics

Scripps joined with Claremont Men's College and Harvey Mudd College in 1976 to form the CMS (Claremont-Mudd-Scripps) Athletics programs. Women's teams compete as the Athenas (men's teams are known as the Stags). A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... Harvey Mudd College is a highly selective, private college of science, engineering, and mathematics, located in Claremont, California. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversies

Scripps College Dean of Students Debra Carlson Wood created a controversy this past semester over advertisements for a White Party that was being hosted by the sophomore class of Claremont Mckenna. The White Party was inspired by Puff Daddy's party of the same name. Guests dress in all white, while neon lights cause their clothing to glow in the dark. The party flier had a picture of DJ Timbo, the DJ for the party, which portrayed two African American dancers in a suggestive pose in the background. The White Party is the name of a number of circuit parties held annually, catering to the LGBT communities. ... Sophomore is used (especially in the USA) for describing a student in the second year of study (generally referring to high school or university study). ... The White Party is the name of a number of circuit parties held annually, catering to the LGBT communities. ... Sean John Combs (born November 4, 1969 aka P. Diddy, Puff Daddy, Sean Puffy Combs) is an American record producer and CEO and founder of Bad Boy Entertainment, one of the driving forces in hip hop in the mid to late 1990s. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


In a heated letter to Claremont Mckenna College Dean of Students Jeff Huang and the entire Scripps student body, Wood said that the posters were racist and sexist. Although she never explained her reasons for finding the posters offensive, she asked all students to protest and boycott the party. The full text of her letter is available below:


"Sometime in the last few days, the CMC class of 2010 left racist and sexist party invitations with what appears to be a racist party theme on the dining room tables at Scripps College, Malott Commons.


These invitations were not stamped approved and we do not know if any CMC staff knew of them or approved of them.


I will not describe the content of the invitations so as not to do any more harm or damage to women and African Americans than has already been done , as I suspect these invitations were deposited throughout one or more of The Colleges.


While principles of free speech may protect these students' rights to advertise in this manner, free speech is best exercised with common sense, intelligence and sensitivity. I am saddened and dismayed , and angered, that students in the year 2008 would use this kind advertising to promote a party. It harms not only women and African Americans, but all of us here at the colleges and undermines our educational efforts.


I urge any other campus which received these invites to take a similar stand against racism and sexism and communicate their anger and dismay to the CMC Class of 2010 through appropriate ways- such as not attending the party, writing letters to the class leadership and/or student news papers, and refusing to tolerate this kind of treatment of members of our communities.


The Scripps Dean of Students Staff, faculty members and members of the Diversity Coordinating Committee ( listed at http://www.scrippscollege.edu/about/diversity/index.php ) stand by to support members of our community, and support may be found at the Office of Black Student Affairs and Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center.


I have already communicated directly with the CMC Dean of Students so he is aware both of the invitations and the nature of them , and my strong feelings about the theme of this party and how people are depicted in the advertising for it."


Organizers were quick to respond and denied any racist or sexist undertones in the material. The president of the student body at Claremont Mckenna even termed her actions inappropriate, unprofessional and a knee-jerk reaction.


Several newspapers covered the incident, including the Daily Bulletin, Washington Post as well as local campus newspapers such as The Student Life and The Claremont Independent. Most newspapers ridiculed her for her supposed misinterpretation of the situation. The events surrounding the White Party were covered in the the Washington Post as well, where she was nominated for OffBeat's 2008 Idiot of the Year Award.


Presidents

  • Ernest Jaqua (1926-1942)
  • Mary Kimberly Shirk (1942-1943) -- acting president
  • Frederick Hard (1944-1964)
  • Mark Curtis (1965-1976)
  • John H. Chandler (1976-1989)
  • E. Howard Brooks (1989-1990)
  • Nancy Y. Bekavac (1990-2007) -- first female president
  • Fritz Weis (Interim 2007-2008)

Nancy Bekavac is the sixth president of Scripps College. ...

Notable faculty

Hartley Burr Alexander, Ph. ... Jun Kaneko is a Japanese ceramic artist living in the United States. ... Gail Thompson Kubik (b. ... Nathan Marsh Pusey (4 April 1907–14 November 2001) was a prominent American educator. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Millard Owen Sheets (1907-1989) was a American painter and an important representative of the California School of painting. ... Paul Soldner (born on April 24, 1921 in Summerfield, Illinois) is an American ceramic artist who is credited with several important advancements in the field and is viewed by many as one of the most important 20th-century studio potters. ... Biography Stewart, Albert ( April 9, 1900- Sept. ...

Notable alumnae

Robert Aitken and Anne Aitken Anne Arundel Hopkins Aitken is considered by many to be one of the modern mothers of Zen Buddhism in the western world. ... For other uses, see Zen (disambiguation). ... Buddhism is a Dharmic religion and philosophy[1] with between 230 to 500 million adherents worldwide. ... Serena Altschul (born October 7, 1970 in New York, New York) is an American broadcast journalist, well known for her work at MTV News. ... China Chow (born April 1974 in London, England) is a British actress. ... An American author who published her first novel at the age of 74, Harriet Doerr (April 8, 1910 – November 24, 2002) was a native of Pasadena, California. ... Molly at the 2005 DemocracyFest, Austin TX Mary Tyler Molly Ivins (August 30, 1944 – January 31, 2007) was an American newspaper columnist, political commentator, and best-selling author from Austin, Texas. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Mary Parker Lewis is a political consultant who most famously served as Chief of Staff to Dr. Alan Keyes, candidate for President of the United States in 1996 and 2000. ... Melanie Rawn is an author of fantasy literature and was born 1954. ... Gabrielle Giffords is a politician and businesswoman from Tucson, Arizona. ... Edith Pattou is the author of several fantasy novels, including East (novel), an ALA Top Ten Best Book for Young Adults. ...

External links

The Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) is a College Athletic Conference that operates in the NCAAs Division III. It consists of eleven small private schools which are located in Southern California and organized into eight athletic programs. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... California Lutheran University (CLU also known as Cal Lutheran) is a university of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America located in Thousand Oaks, California. ... A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... Harvey Mudd College is a highly selective, private college of science, engineering, and mathematics, located in Claremont, California. ... The University of La Verne is a private, non-profit university in La Verne, California (about 35 miles east of Los Angeles), founded in 1891. ... Occidental College is a small private coeducational liberal arts college located in Los Angeles, California. ... Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. ... Pitzer College is a small, highly selective, private residential liberal arts college located in Claremont, California, a college town approximately 30 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. ... The University of Redlands is a private liberal arts and sciences university located in Redlands, California. ... Southwest Quadrant Whittier College in 1912 Hoover Hall and Library Whittier College is a private liberal arts college in Whittier, California. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The History of the National Register of Historic Places began in 1966 when the United States government passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which created the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). ... Clockwise from bottom left: a site, a building, a structure and an object. ... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... Image File history File links US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo. ... This is a list of entries on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
College Profiles - (1608 words)
Scripps aspires to be a diverse community committed to the principles of free inquiry and free expression based on mutual respect.
Scripps emphasizes high aspirations, high achievement, and personal integrity in all pursuits, and it expects students, faculty members, staff, and alumnae to contribute to Scripps and to their own communities throughout their professional, social, and civic lives.
Students applying to Scripps College are expected to submit transcripts of all academic work in high school and college, a counselor recommendation, two teacher recommendations from teachers in different academic subject areas, a graded writing assignment, and SAT or ACT results, along with the application and essay.
TSRI - About TSRI (485 words)
Scripps Clinic, specializing in over 50 fields of medicine and surgery, is a leader in areas as diverse as cancer treatment, neurologic disorders, organ transplantation, cardiovascular disease, treatment of kidney disorders, the use of laser technology for surgery and the management of orthopaedic problems.
Scripps College is the women's college of the Claremont Colleges, founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps to educate women to develop their intellect and talents through active participation in a community of scholars, so that as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity and creativity.
Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Birch Aquarium, part of the University of California, San Diego, is one of the oldest, largest, and most important centers for marine science research and graduate training in the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m