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Encyclopedia > Scottish terrier
Scottish Terrier
A black Scottish Terrier
Country of origin
Scotland
Common nicknames
Scottie
Classification and breed standards
FCI: Group 3 Section 2 #73 Stds
AKC: Terrier Stds
ANKC: Group 2 (Terriers) Stds
CKC: Group 4 - Terriers Stds
KC (UK): Terrier Stds
NZKC: Terrier Stds
UKC: Terriers Stds

The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog best known for its distinctive profile. Picture of a Scottish Terrier taken by Matthew MacKenzie, February 2003. ... This article is about the country. ... Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) (English, World Canine Organization), is an international Kennel Club based in Thuin, Belgium. ... © The American Kennel Club (or AKC) is the largest registry of purebred dog pedigrees in the United States. ... The Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) is the peak body in Australia responsible for promoting excellence in breeding, showing, trialling, obedience, and other canine-related activities and the ownership of temperamentally and physically sound purebred dogs by responsible individuals across Australia. ... The Canadian Kennel Club (or C.K.C.) is the primary registry body for purebred dog pedigrees in Canada. ... The Kennel Club in the United Kingdom is a club aiming to improve the relationships between dogs and their owners. ... The New Zealand Kennel Club is an organisation responsible for dog pedigree registration services in New Zealand. ... The United Kennel Club (or UKC) is the second oldest all-breed registry of purebred dog pedigrees in the United States and the second largest in the world. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ...


The Scottish Terrier is one of five breeds of terrier that originated in Scotland. The other four are Skye, Cairn, Dandie Dinmont, and West Highland White Terriers. Its nickname is "little diehard", given to it in the 19th century by George, the fourth Earl of Dumbarton.[1] The Earl had a famous pack of Scottish Terriers, so brave that they were named “Diehards”. They were supposed to have inspired the name of his Regiment, The Royal Scots, "Dumbarton’s Diehards".[1] This article is about the country. ... The Skye Terrier is a breed of dog that is a long, low terrier that is both hardy and dignified. ... The Cairn Terrier is a breed of dog of the terrier category. ... Disambiguation: Dandie Dinmont is also a character in Guy Mannering, a novel by Walter Scott A Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small breed of dog in the terrier family. ... West Highland White Terriers, commonly known as Westies, are a breed of dog known for their spirited personality and brilliant white coat. ... The title Earl of Dumbarton was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 9 March 1675 for the younger brother of the 1st Earl of Selkirk, Major General, Lord George Douglas. ... The Royal Scots were the oldest, and therefore most senior, infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, having been raised in 1633 during the reign of Charles I of Scotland. ...

Contents

History

The Scottie is often thought to be the oldest of the Highland terriers, although this contention has not been proved.[2] Because several of the highland terriers (including the Scottie) were initially grouped under the generic name, Skye terriers, it has caused some confusion in the breed’s lineage. There is much disagreement over whether the Skye terriers mentioned in early 16th century records actually descended from forerunners of the Scottie or vice versa.[3] It is certain, however, that Scotties and West Highland White Terriers are closely related — both their forefathers originating from the Blackmount region of Perthshire and the Moor of Rannoch.[4] Scotties were originally bred to hunt and kill vermin on farms and to hunt badgers and foxes in the Highlands of Scotland. Scotties are natural "diggers," like other terriers, whose name derives from the same root as "terre," French for "earth."[5] They were bred with strong tails so that their owners could pull them out of holes when they would dig after vermin and voles. Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... West Highland White Terriers, commonly known as Westies, are a breed of dog known for their spirited personality and brilliant white coat. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... Rannoch Moor is a large expanse of around 30 square miles (78 km²) of boggy moorland to the west of Loch Rannoch, in the Watsonian Vice County of Mid Perth and the County of Perthshire, in Scotland. ... Look up vermin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Farm (disambiguation). ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vole (disambiguation). ...


The actual origin of a breed as old as the Scottish Terrier is somewhat obscure and undocumented.[6] The first written records about a dog of similar description to the Scottish Terrier dates from 1436, when Don Leslie described them in his book "The History of Scotland 1436-1561". Two hundred years later, Sir Joshua Reynolds painted a portrait of a young girl caressing a dog remarkably similar to a Scottie.[1] King James VI of Scotland was an important historical figure featuring in the Scottish Terrier's history. In the 17th century, when King James VI became James I of England, he sent six terriers — thought to be forerunners of the Scottish terrier — to a French monarch as a present.[7] His love and adoration for the breed increased their popularity throughout the world.[3] Sir Joshua Reynolds Sir Joshua Reynolds (July 16, 1723–February 23, 1792) was the most important and influential of eighteenth-century English painters, specialising in portraits and promoting the Grand Style in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ...


Many dog writers from the early 1800s on seem to agree that there were two varieties of terrier existing in Britain at the time — a rough haired Scotch Terrier and a smooth haired English Terrier.[6] Thomas Brown, in his Biological Sketches and Authentic Anecdotes of Dogs (1829) states that "the Scotch terrier is certainly the purest in point of breed and the (smooth) English seems to have been produced by a cross from him". Brown went on to describe the Scotch Terrier as "low in stature, with a strong muscular body, short stout legs, a head large in proportion to the body" and was "generally of a sandy colour or black" with a "long, matted and hard" coat.[6] Although the Scotch Terrier described here is more generic than specific to a breed, it asserts the existence of a small, hard, rough-coated terrier developed for hunting small game in the Scottish Highlands in the early 1800s; a description that shares essential characteristics with what was once known as the Aberdeen Terrier and is today known as the Scottish Terrier.[6] In addition the paintings of Sir Edwin Landseer and an 1835 lithograph, entitled "Scottish Terriers at Work on a Cairn in the West Highlands", both depict Scottie type terriers very similar to those described in the first Scottish Terrier Standard.[1] Lutyens Early Life Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens OM (March 29, 1869 - January 1, 1944), a British architect, designed many English country houses and was instrumental in the layout and building of New Delhi. ...


In the 1800s, the Highlands of Scotland, including the Isle of Skye, were abundant with terriers originally known by the generic term "short-haired" or "little Skye terriers."[8] Towards the end of the 19th century, it was decided to separate these Scottish terriers and develop pure bloodlines and specific breeds. Originally, the breeds were separated into two categories – Dandie Dinmont terriers and Skye terriers (not the Skye terrier known today, but a generic name for a large group of terriers with differing traits all said to originate from the Isle of Skye). The Birmingham England dog show of 1860 was the first to offer classes for these groups of terriers.[6] They continued to be exhibited in generic groups for several years and these groups included the ancestors of today's Scottish Terrier.[6] Recorded history, and the initial development of the breed started in the late 1870’s with the growth of dog shows. The exhibiting of dogs required that they be compared to a standard for the breed and the appearance and temperament of the Scottie was written down for the first time.[1] Eventually, the Skye terriers were further divided into what are known today as the Scottish terrier, Skye Terrier, West Highland white terrier and Cairn terrier.[8] Map of the Hebrides. ... This article is about the British city. ...


While identification of the breed was being sought through the late 1800s, the Scottish terrier was known by many different names: the Highland, the Cairn, Diehard, and most often, the Aberdeen Terrier — named because of the dogs abundancy in the area and because a J.A. Adamson of Aberdeen had a lot of success exhibiting his dogs during the 1870s.[6] Roger Rough, owned by Adamson, Tartan, owned by Mr Paynton Piggott, Bon Accord, owned by Messrs Ludlow and Bromfield and Splinter II, owned by Mr Ludlow, were early winners and are the four dogs from which all Scottish Terrier pedigrees ultimately began.[1] It is often said that all present day Scotties stem from a single bitch, Splinter II, and two sires. In her heavily researched book, The New Scottish Terrier, Cindy Cooke refers to Splinter II as the "foundation matron of the modern Scottish Terrier." Cooke goes on to say "For whatever reason, early breeders linebred on this bitch to the virtual exclusion of all others. Mated to Tartan, she produced Worry, the dam of four champions. Rambler, her son by Bonaccord, sired the two founding sires of the breed, Ch. Dundee (out of Worry) and Ch. Alistair (out of a Dundee daughter)" (The New Scottish Terrier, 1996).[9] From Splinter and her sires are descended all the show champions on both sides of the Atlantic.[10] For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... A pedigree is a list of ancestors (usually implying distinguished), a list of ancestors of the same breed (usually in the case of animals), the purity of a breed, individual, or strain, or a document proving any of these things. ... Look up bitch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ...


Captain Gordon Murray and S.E. Shirley were responsible for setting the type in 1879.[4] Shortly afterwards, in 1879, Scotties were for the first time exhibited at Alexander Palace in England, while the following year they began to be classified in much the same way as is done today.[11] The first written standard of the breed was drafted by J.B. Morrison and D.J. Thomson Gray and appeared in Vero Shaw's Illustrated Book of The Dog, published in 1880, and ultimately was extremely influential in setting both breed type and the Scottish terrier name. The standard gave the dog colouring as "Grey, Grizzle or Brindle", as the typically Black colouring of Scotties was not fashionable or favoured until the 1900s.[6] View of the corps de logis from the cour dhonneur. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


In 1881 the "Scottish Terrier Club of England" was founded, being the first club dedicated to the breed. The club secretary, H J Ludlow, is responsible for greatly popularising the breed in the southern parts of Great Britain. The "Scottish Terrier Club of Scotland" wasn't founded until 1888, seven years after the English club.[11] Following the formation of the English and Scottish clubs there followed several years of differences and arguments with regards to what should be deemed as the correct and official standard of the breed.[11] Things were finally settled by a revised standard in 1930, which was based on four prepotent dogs. The dogs were Robert and James Chapman's Heather Necessity, Albourne Barty, bred by AG Cowley, Albourne Annie Laurie, bred by Miss Wijk and Miss Wijk's Marksman of Docken (the litter brother of Annie Laurie).[1] These four dogs and their offspring modified the look of the Scottie, particularly the length of the head, closeness to the ground and the squareness of body. Their subsequent success in the show ring led to them becoming highly sought after by the British public and breeders.[1] As such, the modified standard completely revolutionized the breed.[1] This new standard was subsequently recognised by the Kennel Club UK circa 1930.[11] A kennel club (known as a kennel council or canine council in some countries) is an organization for canine affairs that concerns itself with the breeding, showing and promotion of more than one breed of dog. ...


Scotties were introduced to America in the early 1890's but it was not until the years between World War I and World War II that the breed became popular. A club was formed in 1900 and a standard written in 1925.[1] The Scottish Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1934.[12] By 1936, Scotties were the third most popular breed in the United States. Although they did not permanently stay in fashion, they continue to enjoy a steady popularity with a large segment of the dog-owning public across the world.[10] For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United Kennel Club (or UKC) is the second oldest all-breed registry of purebred dog pedigrees in the United States and the second largest in the world. ...


Appearance

A Scottish Terrier is a small but resilient terrier. Scotties are fast and have a muscular body and neck (a typical neck diameter is 14 inches),[13] often appearing to be barrel chested. They are short-legged, compact and sturdily built, with a long head in proportion to their size. For other uses, see Terrier (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Barrel (disambiguation). ... Male Chest The chest is a part of the anatomy of humans and various other animals. ...


The Scottie should have large paws adapted for digging.[13] Erect ears and tail are salient features of the breed. Their eyes are small, bright and almond-shaped and dark brown or nearly black in colour.[14] For other uses, see Almond (disambiguation). ...


Height at withers for both sexes should be roughly ten inches, and the length of back from withers to tail is roughly eleven inches. Generally a well-balanced Scottie dog should weigh from 19-22 pounds and a female from 18-21 pounds.[15]


The Scottie typically has a hard, wiry, long, weather-resistant outer coat and a soft dense under coat. The coat is typically trimmed and blended, with a longer coat on the beard, eyebrows, legs and lower body — traditionally shaggy-to-the-ground. The head, ears, tail and back are traditionally trimmed short.[16]


The usual coat color ranges from dark gray to jet black. Scotties with 'Wheaten' (straw to nearly white) or 'Brindle' coats sometimes occur, but should not be confused with the Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier or West Highland White Terrier. Galgo Español with light brindle coat This article concerns animal colour. ... The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier is a breed of dog that originated in Ireland. ... West Highland White Terriers, commonly known as Westies, are a breed of dog known for their spirited personality and brilliant white coat. ...


Temperament

Scotties, like most terriers, are alert, quick and feisty — perhaps even more so than other terrier breeds.[17] The breed is known to be independent and self-assured, playful, intelligent and has been nicknamed the 'Diehard' because of its rugged nature and endless determination.[18]

Although black is the most traditional colour for a Scottie, wheaten Scotties can also be found, as shown in this picture of a Scottie puppy.
Although black is the most traditional colour for a Scottie, wheaten Scotties can also be found, as shown in this picture of a Scottie puppy.

Scotties, while being very loving, can also be particularly stubborn. Because the breed is inclined to be stubborn, it needs firm, gentle handling from an early age or it will dominate the household.[19] They are sometimes seen as an aloof breed, although it is actually very loyal to its family and they are known to attach themselves to one or two people in their pack.[20] The breed has been described as tempestuous, but also quite sensitive.[21] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 586 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 750 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Scottish Terrier Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 586 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 750 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Scottish Terrier Metadata...


The Scottish terrier makes a good watchdog due to its tendency to bark only when necessary and because it is typically reserved with strangers — although this is not always the case and it is important to remember that all dogs differ.[21][18] It is a fearless breed that may be aggressive around other dogs unless introduced at an early age.[22]


The Scottie is prone to dig as well as chase and hunt small vermin, such as Squirrels, rats, mice and foxes — a trait that they were originally bred for. For this reason it is recommended that they are walked on a leash.[22] Look up vermin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the animal. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... Mice may refer to: An abbreviation of Meetings, Incentives, Conferencing, Exhibitions. ... This article is about the animal. ...


Health

Scottish Terriers have a greater chance of developing some cancers than other purebreds. According to research by the Veterinary Medical Data Program (1986), six cancers that Scotties appeared to be more at risk for (when compared to other breeds) are: (in descending order) bladder cancer and other transitional cell carcinomas of the lower urinary tract; malignant melanoma; gastric carcinoma; squamous cell carcinoma of the skin; lymphosarcoma and nasal carcinoma.[23] Other cancers that are known to commonly affect Scotties include mast cell sarcoma[24] and hemangiosarcoma.[25] Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. ... Transitional cell carcinoma is a type of cancer that originates in the kidney, bladder or ureter. ... Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. ... In medicine, stomach cancer (also called gastric cancer) can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs. ... Biopsy of a highly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth. ... Lymphoma in animals is a type of cancer defined by a proliferation of malignant lymphocytes within solid organs such as the lymph nodes, bone marrow, liver and spleen. ... A mast cell tumor is a type of tumor consisting of mast cells that is found in many species of animals. ... Hemangiosarcoma is a rapidly growing, highly invasive variety of cancer. ...


Research has suggested that Scottish Terriers are 20 times more likely to get bladder cancer than other breeds[26] and the most common kind of bladder cancer is transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (TCC).[23] Dr. Deborah Knapp of Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine has commented "TCC usually occurs in older dogs (average age 11 years) and is more common in females (2:1 ratio of females to males)."[23] Symptoms of TCC are blood in the urine, straining to urinate, and frequent urination — although owners noticing any of these symptoms should also be aware that the same symptoms may also be indicative of a urinary tract infection. Veterinary assistance should be sought, and an ultrasound should be requested to confirm.[23] Purdue redirects here. ... For other uses, see Blood (disambiguation). ... This article is about the urine of animals generally. ... For other uses, see Ultrasound (disambiguation). ...


The most common and effective form of treatment for TCC is Piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that "allows the cancer cells to kill themselves."[23] In order to help prevent cancer in a dog, an owner should ensure that their dog has minimal exposure to herbicides, pesticides, solvents and cigarette smoke; use caution when treating dogs with some flea medications; provide a healthy, vitamin-rich diet (low in carbohydrates, high in vegetables) and plenty of exercise.[27] An herbicide is used to kill unwanted plants. ... A cropduster spreading pesticide. ... For other uses, see Solvent (disambiguation). ... Unlit filtered cigarettes. ... For other uses, see Flea (disambiguation). ... Retinol (Vitamin A) A vitamin is a nutrient that is an organic compound required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ...


Two other genetic health concerns in the breed are von Willebrand disease (vWD) and craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); Scottie cramp, patellar luxation and cerebellar abiotrophy are also sometimes seen in this breed.[28] Scottish Terrier owners are advised to have DNA tests performed to screen for von Willebrand's disease. Scotties typically live between 11 and 13 years.[29] Von Willebrand disease (vWD) is the most common hereditary coagulation abnormality described in humans, although it can also be acquired as a result of other medical conditions. ... Craniomandibular osteopathy is a developmental disease in dogs causing extensive bony changes in the mandible and skull. ... Scotty Cramp is a disease in Scottish Terriers causing spasms and hyperflexion and hyperextension of the legs. ... Luxating patella, or trick knee, is a condition in which the patella, or kneecap, dislocates or moves out of its normal location. ... Cerebellar abiotrophy (CA), also referred to as cerebellar cortical abiotrophy (CCA), is a genetic neurological disease in animals best known to affect certain breeds of horses and dogs. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...


Famous Scotties

Barney, the Scottish Terrier belonging to President George W. Bush, on the presidential stand.
Barney, the Scottish Terrier belonging to President George W. Bush, on the presidential stand.

The Scottie is the only breed of dog that has lived in the White House three times.[30] President Franklin D. Roosevelt was renowned for owning a Scottie named Fala.[31] Fala was a gift to the President from his cousin, Margaret Stuckley. The President loved Fala so much that he rarely went anywhere without him. Roosevelt had several Scotties before Fala including one named Duffy and another one named Mr. Duffy.[31] Image File history File links Barney-20040908. ... Image File history File links Barney-20040908. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... FDR with Fala at Warm Springs, Georgia. ...


More recently, President George W. Bush has owned two Scottish terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley.[32] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Barney on the Presidential podium Barney (born September 30, 2000 in New Jersey, U.S.A.), often referred to as the First Dog, is a Scottish Terrier owned by U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. ... Miss Beazley at play Miss Beazley (born October 28, 2004), is a dog (Scottish Terrier) owned by U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. ...


Other famous people who are known to have owned Scotties include: Humphrey Bogart; Bette Davis; Julie Andrews; Liza Minnelli; E.B. White; Queen Victoria; Ronald Reagan; Theodore Roosevelt; Dorothy Lamour; Eva Braun and Shirley Temple among others.[33] Bogart redirects here. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Dorothy Lamour (December 10, 1914 – September 22, 1996) was an American motion picture actress. ... Eva Anna Paula Braun, died Eva Hitler[1] (February 6, 1912 – April 30, 1945) was the longtime companion of Adolf Hitler and briefly his wife. ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an iconic American child actor of the 1930s. ...


A famous fictional Scottie is Jock from the Disney feature film Lady and the Tramp, where he acted as the retired captain with a Scottish tartan overcoat. In 1955, when the movie was originally released, Jock became one of the most popular dog names of the time.[34] A Scottish Terrier and a Westhighland White Terrier are also featured on the Black & White whisky label.[35] Jock and Trusty are two fictional animated dogs from the Disney movie Lady and the Tramp. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution. ... Black & White is a blended Scotch whisky. ...


A Scottie dog is also renowned for featuring in the popular board game, Monopoly, as a player token. When the game was first created in the 1930s Scotties were one of the most popular pets in America. It is also one of the most popular Monopoly game tokens, according to Matt Collins, vice president of marketing for Hasbro.[36] A board game is a game played with counters or pieces that are placed on, removed from, or moved across a board (a premarked surface, usually specific to that game). ... Monopoly is a board game published by Parker Brothers, an imprint of Hasbro. ... Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is an American toy and game company. ...


In May 2007, Carnegie Mellon University officially named the Scottish Terrier its official mascot.[37] The Scottie had been a long-running unofficial mascot of the university, whose founder's Scottish heritage is also honored by the official athletic nickname of "Tartans."[38] Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Founded in 1889, Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, Georgia uses the Scottie as their mascot. www.agnesscott.edu


References

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  37. ^ http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/innovation/2007/spring/scottie-comes-home.shtml
  38. ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07029/757646-298.stm

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • A Study of the Scottish Terrier - Published by the Scottish Terrier Club of America
  • Scottish Terrier Breed Standard - The British Kennel Club
  • Scottish Terrier Breed Standard - The American Kennel Club
  • Scottish Terrier Club of America - Official website of the American Scottish Terrier club
  • Scottish Terrier and Dog News - Daily news about Scottish Terriers making headlines as well as video and photos. Funny and quirky.
  • The Scotty Appeal - Modern: Scottie, Scotties, Scottish Terrier. Ole: Aberdeen Old Scottish Terrier, Scotty, Scotti, Scoti. A Scottish Terrier Pro Bono Personal Site. Relieving Grief of Losing Your Cherished Dog to The Rainbow Bridge. Locating Your New Family Member to Rule Their Scottish Terrier Home. A-1 Terriers - Open to All Terrier Type People Fully Owned, Operated, & Managed by Terriers.
  • Scottish Terrier (Scottie) - wiki Wetpaint Scottish Terrier

  Results from FactBites:
 
American Kennel Club - Scottish Terrier (1177 words)
The Scottish Terrier is a small, compact, short-legged, sturdily-built dog of good bone and substance.
Generally, a well-balanced Scottish Terrier dog should weigh from 19 to 22 pounds and a bitch from 18 to 21 pounds.
The use, size, shape and placement of the ear and its erect carriage are major elements of the keen, alert, intelligent Scottish Terrier expression.
Mammals » Dogs » Scottish Terrier Main Page (734 words)
The Scottish Terrier retains many of the personality traits for which they were originally bred, and for this reason it is important they not be outside off leash as they can and often will go chasing after small animals.
The Scottish Terrier is related to the West Highland White Terrier, and it may have originally been known as the "Aberdeen Terrier", though many sources state that the Aberdeen was in fact an ancestor to the Scottie.
This breed is prone to 'Scottish Cramp' (appears during the first year, causing muscle stiffness and limping when the dog is exercised or excited), von Willebrand's disease (akin to hemophilia in humans), craniomandibular osteopathy (abnormal bone growth in the head region, seen in young dogs), allergies, intervertebral disc protrusion, and elbow dysplasia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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