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Encyclopedia > Scottish smallpipes

The Scottish smallpipe is a bellows-blown bagpipe developed from the Northumbrian smallpipes by Colin Ross and others, to be playable according to the Great Highland Bagpipe fingering system. It is distinguished from the Northumbrian smallpipes by having an open end to the chanter, and by the lack of keys; this means that the sound of the chanter is continuous, rather than staccato, and that its range is nine notes, rather than the nearly two octaves of the Northumbian pipes. Historical antecedents do exist, but modern designs are not directly based on these and there is no unbroken line of traditional playing. A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The Northumbrian smallpipes (also known as the Northumbrian pipes) are bellows-blown bagpipes from Northumbria in the north-east of England. ... Pipe Major Probably the most well known variety of bagpipes are the Great Highland Bagpipes (abbreviated GHBs, and commonly referred to simply as pipes), which were developed in Scotland and Ireland. ... Fingering, also called fingerbanging or finger fucking is the practice of stimulating the vagina or anus of a sexual partner by inserting the fingers, and is a common form of mutual masturbation. ...


It has a parallel bored chanter, most commonly pitched in A, although any key is feasible; D, C, and B flat are the next most common keys. Being parallel bored, the chanter sounds an octave lower than a conical-bored chanter of the same size, as on the Border pipes.


They are most commonly unkeyed, but occasionally G sharp, F natural, and C natural keys are added. It is possible to add enough keys to produce a two-octave chromatic scale, but this is rarely done. No prominent pipers are known to use such a set. The chromatic scale is the scale that contains all twelve pitches of the Western tempered scale. ...


The drones are set in a common stock and are tuned to the tonic, the fourth below (being the fifth or dominant note of the scale) (some players choose to retune this to the sub-dominant or fourth instead for tunes in the subdominant key), and an octave below the tonic. Tonic may mean: A concept from musical harmony and musical theory: see Tonic (music); A carbonated beverage flavoured with quinine, used in cocktails: see Tonic water. ... The word dominant has several possible meanings: In music theory, the dominant or dominant note (second most important) of a key is that which is a perfect fifth above the tonic; in just intonation the note whose pitch is 1. ...


It is perhaps the youngest bagpipe with any popularity, having only existed in its modern form since the early 1980s. MacGyver - 1980s hero The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ...


It is, however, extremely popular, particularly with Highland pipers, many of whom keep it or a border pipe as a second instrument. It has to some extent supplanted the musically unsatisfactory Highland practice chanter as a rehearsal instrument for Highland pipers. Pipe Major Probably the most well known variety of bagpipes are the Great Highland Bagpipes (abbreviated GHBs, and commonly referred to simply as pipes), which were developed in Scotland and Ireland. ... The border pipe is a close cousin of the Highland bagpipe, and commonly confused with the Scottish smallpipe, although it is a quite different and much older instrument. ...


Mouth-blown versions are available, but it is difficult to produce quality tone from these instruments due to the reed's delicate construction. They are normally bellows-blown like the Northumbrian pipes and Border pipes.


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Bagpipes (8767 words)
It dates largely from the last two centuries, being either Scottish or Irish folk music played on the pipes, tunes written by pipers in the British Army during this time, or, increasingly, tunes composed by pipers in civilian pipe bands.
The Scottish smallpipe is a bellows-blown bagpipe developed from the Northumbrian smallpipe by Colin Ross (1970s), to be playable according to the Great Highland Bagpipe fingering system.
The Border pipe is a close cousin of the Highland bagpipe, and is commonly confused with the Scottish smallpipe, although it is a quite different and much older instrument.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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