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Encyclopedia > Scottish Lowlands
Lowland-Highland divide
Lowland-Highland divide

The Scottish Lowlands (a' Ghalldachd, meaning roughly 'the non-Gaelic region', in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due south and east of a line (the Highland Boundary Fault) between Stonehaven and Helensburgh (on the Firth of Clyde). Confusingly, some parts of the Lowlands, such as the Southern Uplands are not physically 'low', and some sections of the Highlands, such as Islay are low-lying. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 456 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (584 × 768 pixel, file size: 185 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 456 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (584 × 768 pixel, file size: 185 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the country. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The Gàidhealtachd, sometimes known as A Ghàidhealtachd (the Gàidhealtachd), usually refers to the Scottish Highlands in Scottish Gaelic. ... The Highland Boundary Fault traverses Scotland from Arran to Stonehaven. ... Market Square, Stonehaven Stonehaven (Steenhive in the Doric dialect of Scots) and Cala na Creige in Gaelic is a town with around fourteen thousand inhabitants (9,577 in 2001 (census)) on the North-East coast of Scotland. ... Helensburghs Rhu Road, looking west towards Rhu, Rosneath and the Gare Loch. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... The Southern Uplands is the southernmost of Scotlands three major geographic areas (the others being the Central Belt and the Highlands). ... Islay (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: , or ee-luh), a Scottish island, known as The Queen of the Hebrides, is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides. ...


It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Ayrshire, Berwickshire, Clackmannanshire, Dumfriesshire, East Lothian[1], Fife, Kinross-shire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Lanarkshire, Mid-Lothian[2], Peeblesshire, Renfrewshire, Roxburghshire, Selkirkshire, West Lothian[3] and Wigtownshire. Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... Berwickshire (Siorrachd Bhearaig in Gaelic) is a committee area of the Scottish Borders Council and a Lieutenancy area of Scotland, on the border with England. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... Dumfriesshire or the County of Dumfries (Siorrachd Dhùn Phris in Gaelic) is a registration county of Scotland. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... Kinross-shire was a county of Scotland. ... Kirkcudbrightshire (pronounced Kir-COO-bri-shir, also known as the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright or as East Galloway, and Siorrachd Chille Chuithbheirt in Gaelic) is a traditional county of south-western Scotland, bounded on the north and north-west by Ayrshire, on the west and southwest by Wigtownshire, on the south... Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Midlothian is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... Peeblesshire (Siorrachd nam Pùballan in Gaelic) is a traditional county in Scotland. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Roxburghshire (Siorrachd Rosbroig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Selkirkshire or the County of Selkirk is a registration county of Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 20th  - Total 427 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Livingston ISO 3166-2 GB-WLN ONS code 00RH Demographics Population Ranked 10th  - Total (2005) 163,780  - Density 384 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics West Lothian Council http://www. ... Wigtownshire is a small traditional county in the south west of Scotland. ...


Traditional Scottish counties which include both Highland and Lowland sections include Angus[4], Dunbartonshire, Stirlingshire, Perthshire, Kincardineshire, Aberdeenshire, Banffshire and Moray. Location Geography Area Ranked 10th  - Total 2,182 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Forfar ISO 3166-2 GB-ANS ONS code 00QC Demographics Population Ranked 19th  - Total (2005) 109,170  - Density 50 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Angus Council http://www. ... Dunbartonshire is one of the Traditional counties of Scotland, in that part of the country formerly called Lennox (which was a title of nobility). ... Stirlingshire (Siorrachd Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland, based around Stirling, the traditional county town. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... Kincardineshire, also known as The Mearns (from A Mhaoirne meaning The Stewartry) is a traditional county on the coast of Northeast Scotland. ... The traditional county of Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) borders Banffshire and Inverness-shire to the west, Perthshire, Angus and Kincardineshire to the south, and the North Sea to the north and east. ... Banffshire (Siorrachd Bhanbh in Gaelic) is a small traditional county in the north of Scotland. ... Moray (pronounced Murray, spelled A Moireibh in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. ...


Although Caithness, is sometimes classified under Highlands and Islands, it is also often considered 'Lowland' and are differentiated from the Gàidhealtachd when, for example, discussing Lowland Scots (although sections of Caithness spoke Gaelic into the 20th century). Orkney and Shetland are sometimes called 'lowland', mainly because of their current language, but have a separate identity derived from the Norse to the point of some islanders not considering themselves Scottish. Caithness (Gallaibh in Gaelic)[1] is a committee area of Highland Council, Scotland; a lieutenancy area; and a registration county, Caithness was formerly a district within the Highland region from 1975 to 1996 and a local government county with its own county council from 1890 to 1975. ... The Highlands and Islands is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... The Gàidhealtachd, sometimes known as A Ghàidhealtachd (the Gàidhealtachd), usually refers to the Scottish Highlands in Scottish Gaelic. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2005) 19,590  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 12th  - Total 1,466 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lerwick ISO 3166-2 GB-ZET ONS code 00RD Demographics Population Ranked 31st  - Total (2005) 22,000  - Density 15 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Shetland Islands Council http://www. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ...


Geographically, Scotland is divided into three distinct areas: the Highlands, the Central plain (Central Belt), and the Southern Uplands. The Lowlands cover roughly the latter two. Strictly speaking, the northeast plain is also low-land, both geographically and culturally, but in some contexts may be grouped together with the Highlands. Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The Central Belt of Scotland is a common term used to describe the area of highest population density within Scotland. ... The Southern Uplands is the southernmost of Scotlands three major geographic areas (the others being the Central Belt and the Highlands). ...


The southernmost counties of Scotland, nearest the border with England, are also known as the Borders. They are sometimes considered separately to the rest of the Lowlands. Many descendants of the Scots-Irish, as they are known in the United States, or Ulster-Scots, originated from the lowlands and borders region before having migrated to the Ulster Plantation in the 17th century and later the American frontier, many prior to the American Revoultion. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... The Plantation of Ulster was a planned process of colonisation which took place in the northern Irish province of Ulster during the early 17th century in the reign of James I of England. ...


The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to the Lowland Scots, Scottish history and the Scottish clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy. Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Clan map of Scotland Scottish clans (from Old Gaelic clann, children), give a sense of identity and shared descent to people in Scotland and to their relations throughout the world, with a formal structure of Clan Chiefs officially registered with the court of the Lord Lyon, King of Arms which... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ...


Notes

  • [1] East Lothian was known as Haddingtonshire until 1921.
  • [2] Mid-Lothian was known as Edinburghshire until 1921.
  • [4] Angus was known as Forfarshire until 1928.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Scottish Lowlands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (276 words)
It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Selkirkshire, the Lothians, Berwickshire, Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfriesshire, Peeblesshire, Roxburghshire and Ayrshire.
Orkney and Shetland are sometimes called "lowland", mainly because of their current language, but have a separate identity derived from the Norse to the point of some islanders not considering themselves Scottish.
The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to the Lowland Scots, Scottish history and the Scottish clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy.
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