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Encyclopedia > Scottish Government
The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire.

The Scottish Government (SG) (Scottish Gaelic: Riaghaltas na h-Alba) is the executive arm of government of Scotland. It was established in 1999 as the Scottish Executive — which remains its legal name in accordance with the Scotland Act 1998 — but, following the 2007 Scottish general election, its name was changed by the incoming Scottish National Party administration. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, a white saltire with an official Pantone 300 coloured field. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the country. ... The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ... The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ...

Contents

Executive arm of government

Scotland

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Scotland
This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... The Politics of Scotland forms a distinctive part of the wider politics of the United Kingdom, with Scotland one of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom. ...











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The Scottish Government is responsible for all issues that are not explicitly reserved to the United Kingdom Parliament at Westminster, by the Scotland Act; including NHS Scotland, education, justice, rural affairs, and transport. It managed an annual budget of more than £27 billion in the financial year 2005-2006; this is due to rise to over £30 billion in 2007-2008.[1] Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born December 31, 1954, Linlithgow), is a Scottish politician, and the current First Minister of Scotland, heading a minority government. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Nicola Sturgeon (born on 19 July 1970 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... The 3rd Scottish Parliament convened after the 2007 election. ... The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is a government department in Scotland that is responsible for the public prosecution of alleged criminals. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Lord Advocate the Rt Hon. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ... Frank Mulholland, QC, is a Scottish lawyer. ... Executive agencies are established by Ministers as part of Scottish Government departments, or as departments in their own right, to carry out a discrete area of work. ... Scottish public bodies are a group of organisations that are funded by the Scottish Executive. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ... The Presiding Officer (Oifigear-Riaghlaidh in Scots Gaelic) is the Speaker, the person elected by the Members of the Scottish Parliament to chair their meetings. ... Alex Fergusson (born 8 April 1949, Leswart, The Stewartry) is a Scottish Conservative and Unionist politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Galloway and Upper Nithsdale since 2003. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the first Scottish Parliament at the 1999 election. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the second Scottish Parliament at the 2003 election. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the third Scottish Parliament at the 2007 election. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The Scottish Parliament election, 1999 was the first general election of the Scottish Parliament, with voting taking place on May 6th, 1999. ... The polling date for the second Scottish Parliament election was held on May 1, 2003. ... The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ... The 2011 Scottish Parliament election will be the fourth general election to the devolved Scottish Parliament since it was created in 1999. ... A Legislative Consent Motion (formerly known as a Sewel motion) is a parliamentary motion passed by the Scottish Parliament, in which it agrees that the Parliament of the United Kingdom may pass legislation on a devolved issue extending to Scotland, over which the Scottish Parliament has regular legislative authority. ... A logo of Her Majestys Government. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... Desmond Henry Browne (born 22 March 1952), commonly known as Des Browne, is a Scottish Labour Party politician. ... The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ... In the United Kingdom reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as stated by the Scotland Act 1998, Northern Ireland Act 1998 or Government of Wales Act 1998. ... Her Majestys Advocate General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-tagraidh na Bànrighe airson Alba in Gaelic) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, whose duty is to advise the Crown and UK Government on Scots law. ... Neil Forbes Davidson, Baron Davidson of Glen Clova QC BA, MSc, LLB, LLM (born 13 September 1950) is a Scottish lawyer. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... As a result of the Fifth Periodical Review of the Boundary Commission for Scotland, Scotland is covered by 59 constituencies of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... The Scottish Grand Committee is a committee of the House of Commons. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June 2010, barring exceptional circumstances. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons by Scottish constituencies for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom (2005 to present). ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The European Parliament election, 2004 was the UK part of the European Parliament election, 2004. ... Elections to the European Parliament will be held in June 2006 in the then–27 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... The local government of Scotland is organised into 32 unitary authorities covering the mainland and islands of Scotland. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... The Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) is the representative association of Scottish local government and is the employers’ association on behalf of all Scottish councils. ... // Parties represented in the Scottish Parliament (in order of number of representatives): Scottish National Party (SNP) - centre-left, social democratic, pro-independence- 47 MSPs Labour - centre-left, unionist - 46 MSPs Conservative - centre-right, conservative, unionist - 17 MSPs Liberal Democrat - centre-left, federalist - 16 MSPs Scottish Green Party - left-wing, environmentalist... Scottish independence is a political ambition of a number of political parties, pressure groups and individuals within and outside of Scotland. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... In Scotland reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as explicitly stated in the Scotland Act 1998. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... The logo of NHS Scotland NHSScotland is the official corporate style of the National Health Service operations in Scotland. ... Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... GBP redirects here. ...


It consists of a First Minister, who leads the Government, and various ministers with individual portfolios and remits. The Scottish Parliament nominates a member to be appointed as First Minister by the Queen. The First Minister then appoints ministers and junior ministers, subject to approval by the Parliament. The First Minister, ministers (but not junior ministers), the Lord Advocate and Solicitor General are the members of the Scottish Executive, as set out in the Scotland Act 1998. They are collectively known as "the Scottish Ministers". The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... A ministry is a department of a government, led by a minister. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary [1]; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, and their respective overseas territories and dependencies. ... Junior ministers are usually ministers of below cabinet rank, such as Ministers of State and Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State in the UK. Although they do not usually head a department, the actual power that these ministers hold varies from person to person. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ...


Similar to the United Kingdom government, there is no division between the executive and the legislative arms of government, with the members of the Scottish Executive being chosen from amongst the Members of the Scottish Parliament (except for the Lord Advocate and the Solicitor General, who need not be MSPs). The members of the Scottish Executive are assisted by a number of junior ministers, also chosen from amongst the Members of the Parliament. The members of the Executive are therefore able to influence, and in practice dictate legislation in Scotland. The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ...


The Scottish Government is currently formed by the Scottish National Party who are the largest party in the Scottish Parliament, although they do not possess an overall majority. The current First Minister is Alex Salmond. The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born December 31, 1954, Linlithgow), is a Scottish politician, and the current First Minister of Scotland, heading a minority government. ...


Ministers

Main article: List of Scottish Governments

The structure of the ministerial team proposed by the Scottish National Party (SNP) after their election victory in May 2007 differs from the previous administration. The nomenclature of Cabinet Secretary has been introduced. The Cabinet Secretaries and Ministers are:[2] List of Scottish Governments is a list of all Scottish Government (formerly Scottish Executive) ministerial teams which have existed, since the introduction of political autonomy for Scotland in 1999. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ...

Portfolio Minister
First Minister Alex Salmond
Deputy First Minister
Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing
Nicola Sturgeon
Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Sustainable Growth John Swinney
Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning Fiona Hyslop
Cabinet Secretary for Justice Kenny MacAskill
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment Richard Lochhead
Minister for Parliamentary Business Bruce Crawford
Minister for Europe, External Affairs and Culture Linda Fabiani
Minister for Enterprise, Energy and Tourism Jim Mather
Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Climate Change Stewart Stevenson
Minister for Schools and Skills Maureen Watt
Minister for Children and Early Years Adam Ingram
Minister for Public Health Shona Robison
Minister for Communities and Sport Stewart Maxwell
Minister for Community Safety Fergus Ewing
Minister for Environment Mike Russell
Lord Advocate Elish Angiolini
Solicitor General for Scotland Frank Mulholland

Ministers must follow the Scottish Ministerial Code, a code of conduct and guidance on procedures. The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born December 31, 1954, Linlithgow), is a Scottish politician, and the current First Minister of Scotland, heading a minority government. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... The Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing in Scotland is a cabinet position in the devolved Scottish Executive. ... Nicola Sturgeon (born on 19 July 1970 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... The Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning is a position in the Scottish Executive cabinet responsible for the Scottish Executive Education Department. ... Fiona Hyslop, born August 1, 1964 is a Scottish politician. ... The Cabinet Secretary for Justice in Scotland is a cabinet position in the devolved Scottish Executive. ... Kenny MacAskill (born 28 April 1958) is an Scottish National Party politican, the Cabinet Secretary for Justice and Member of the Scottish Parliament for the Edinburgh East and Musselburgh. ... The Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment is a position in the Scottish Executive cabinet responsible for the Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department. ... Richard Lochhead (born May 24, 1969 in Paisley, Scotland) is a Scottish politician. ... The Minister for Parliamentary Business is a member the Scottish Executive whose job it is to steer government business through the Scottish Parliament. ... Bruce Crawford, born February 16, 1955, is a Scottish politician. ... The Minister for Europe, External Affairs and Culture is a Junior ministerial post in the Scottish Government. ... Linda Fabiani (born December 14, 1956) is a Scottish politician. ... The Minister for Enterprise, Energy and Tourism is a Junior ministerial post in the Scottish Government. ... Jim Mather was born on March 6, 1947. ... The Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Climate Change is a member of the Scottish Government who works to the Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Sustainable Growth. ... For the fictional character, see Stewart (Beavis and Butt-head). ... The Minister for Schools and Skills is a Junior ministerial post in the Education Department of the Scottish Government. ... Maureen Watt, born in Aberdeenshire, is a Scottish National Party (SNP) Member of the Scottish Parliament for North East Scotland. ... The Minister for Children and Early Years is a Junior ministerial post in the Education Department of the Scottish Government. ... Adam Ingram is a Scottish National Party (SNP) politician. ... The Minister for Public Health is a Junior ministerial post in the Scottish Government. ... Shona Robison MSP Shona Robison is a Member of the Scottish Parliament for Dundee East, being elected as a Scottish National Party (SNP) candidate at the 2003 election. ... The Minister for Communities and Sport is a Junior ministerial post in the Scottish Government. ... Stewart Maxwell (born December 24, 1963 in Glasgow) is the Minister for Communities and Sport and Member of the Scottish Parliament for the West of Scotland, being elected as a Scottish National Party (SNP), Additional Members System member at the 2003 election. ... The Minister for Community Safety is a Junior ministerial post in the Scottish Government. ... Fergus Ewing, born September 23, 1957 is a Scottish National Party (SNP) MSP. He is the son of veteran Scottish Nationalist Winnie Ewing (his father was also a SNP councillor) and has long been active in the SNP. He studied law at the University of Glasgow where he was a... For environment ministers in other countries, see Minister of the Environment. ... Michael Russell (Mike Russell) (born August 1953 in Bromley, Kent) is a member of the Scottish Parliament for the South of Scotland region. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Lord Advocate the Rt Hon. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ... Frank Mulholland, QC, is a Scottish lawyer. ...


Cabinet

St. Andrew's House, on Calton Hill
Victoria Quay, in Leith
Victoria Quay, in Leith

The Scottish Cabinet normally meets weekly on Tuesday afternoons at Bute House, in Charlotte Square, the official residence of the First Minister. The Cabinet consists of the Scottish Ministers, excluding the Law Officers (the Lord Advocate and the Solicitor General). The Lord Advocate attends meetings of the Cabinet but is not formally a member.[3] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Southern aspect of St Andrews House on Calton Hill. ... Calton hill is a Site of Special Scientific Interest in Derbyshire, showing Olivine Diorite magma chamber. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 813 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 813 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Victoria Quay Victoria Quay (VQ) is a Scottish Government building situated in Leith, Edinburgh. ... The Water of Leith looking upriver from the docks, with the old buildings along Leith Shore including The Kings Wark and The Old Ship Hotel and Kings Landing. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... Bute House in Charlotte Square, official residence of the First Minister of Scotland Charlotte Square is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland part of the New Town, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... Bute House in Charlotte Square, official residence of the First Minister of Scotland Charlotte Square is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland part of the New Town, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... // An official residence is the residence at which heads of state, heads of government, gubernatorial or other senior figures officially reside. ... The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ...


The Cabinet is supported by the Cabinet Secretariat, which is based at St Andrew's House. Southern aspect of St Andrews House on Calton Hill. ...


There are two sub-committees of Cabinet-

  • Cabinet Sub-Committee on Legislation
    • Membership: the Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing, the Minister for Parliamentary Business, and the Lord Advocate.
  • Scottish Executive Emergency Room Cabinet Sub-Committee
    • Membership: Cabinet Secretary for Justice (Chair), the Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Sustainable Growth, the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing, the Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment and the Lord Advocate.

This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ...

Offices

The headquarters building of the Scottish Government is St. Andrew's House, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh. Some other Government departments are based at Victoria Quay in Leith, Pentland House in Gorgie and Saughton House on Broomhouse Drive. The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service has its offices at Chambers Street in central Edinburgh. Southern aspect of St Andrews House on Calton Hill. ... The top of Calton Hill with the National Monument and Nelsons Monument View over Edinburgh, with the Dugald Stewart Monument in the foreground Calton Hill is a hill in Edinburgh, Scotland, just to the east of the city centre. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Victoria Quay Victoria Quay (VQ) is a Scottish Government building situated in Leith, Edinburgh. ... The Water of Leith looking upriver from the docks, with the old buildings along Leith Shore including The Kings Wark and The Old Ship Hotel and Kings Landing. ... Gorgie is an area of west Edinburgh, located near Murrayfield. ... Chambers Street is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland, at south of the Old Town. ...


There are numerous other Edinburgh properties occupied by the Scottish Government. Group security is based in the old Governor's House on the site of the former Calton Gaol, next door to St Andrews House on Regent Road. The Government Car Service for Scotland also has its Edinburgh offices on Bonnington Road, in Leith. Some offices are located on Waterloo Place separately from St Andrews House. Other small offices are scattered around central Edinburgh, including Bute House, the official residence of the First Minister.


New St Andrews House behind Edinburgh's St James Centre was once a large Scottish Office building, which was occupied until 1997 when the last remaining staff moved to Victoria Quay. Asbestos was found to be present in the walls of this building and it has lain empty for the past decade. For other uses, see Asbestos (disambiguation). ...


The Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department is located in central Glasgow, and its European Union representative office is located at rond-point Schuman in Brussels, Belgium. The Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) is the Scottish Executive department responsible for economic and industrial development, further and higher education, skills, lifelong learning, energy, transport and digital connectivity. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


Several executive agencies also form part of the government, and the accountable officers of these agencies report to Scottish Ministers. The Scottish Executive includes a number of agencies, as set out below- Accountant in Bankruptcy Communities Scotland Fisheries Research Service Historic Scotland Her Majestys Inspectorate of Education National Archives of Scotland Registers of Scotland Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) Scottish Building Standards Agency Scottish Court Service Scottish...


United Kingdom Civil Service in Scotland

The term Scottish Government also denotes the civil service supporting Scottish Ministers. According to the most recent (2006) reports, there are 15,263 civil servants working in core Scottish Government departments and agencies.[4] The civil service is a matter reserved to the United Kingdom Parliament (rather than devolved to Holyrood): Scottish Government civil servants work within the rules and customs of the United Kingdom civil service, but "owe their loyalty to the devolved administration rather than the UK government".[5] The Roman civil service in action. ... In the United Kingdom reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as stated by the Scotland Act 1998, Northern Ireland Act 1998 or Government of Wales Act 1998. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... In UK politics, the civil service of the United Kingdom is the permanent bureaucracy that administers the United Kingdom. ... A logo of Her Majestys Government. ...


Other civil servants based in Scotland carry out functions which are not the responsibility of the Scottish Government, for example those in the Ministry of Defence. The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ...


Until 2007, the (then) Scottish Executive was made up of 9 Departments, as set out below.

In 2007 the separate Departments were abolished and the work is now carried out by a number of Directorates, each headed by a Director (see Civil Service grading schemes). The Permanent Secretary and Directors-General (formerly the Department heads) now form a Strategic Board, responsible for overseeing the achievement of the 5 strategic objectives. The Office of the Permanent Secretary (OPS) is a civil service department of the Scottish Executive. ... The Scottish Executive Development Department (SEDD) is a civil service department of the Scottish Executive. ... The Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) is the civil service department of the Scottish Executive with responsibility for schooling. ... The Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) is the Scottish Executive department responsible for economic and industrial development, further and higher education, skills, lifelong learning, energy, transport and digital connectivity. ... The Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department (SEERAD) is a department of the Scottish Executive. ... The Finance and Central Services Department (SEFCSD) was a civil service department of the Scottish Executive. ... The Scottish Executive Health Department (SEHD) is a civil service department of the Scottish Executive. ... The Scottish Executive Justice Department is the civil service department of the Scottish Executive with responsibility for criminal justice, police and fire services in Scotland. ... Scottish Executive Legal and Parliamentary Services (LPS) is a civil service department of the Scottish Executive. ... Her Majestys Civil Service is the permanent bureaucracy of Crown employees that supports UK Government Ministers. ...


There are also 17 Executive Agencies established by Ministers as part of government departments, or as departments in their own right, to carry out a discrete area of work. These include the Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency, Scottish Prison Service and Transport Scotland. Agencies are staffed by civil servants. The Scottish Executive includes a number of agencies, as set out below- Accountant in Bankruptcy Communities Scotland Fisheries Research Service Historic Scotland Her Majestys Inspectorate of Education National Archives of Scotland Registers of Scotland Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) Scottish Building Standards Agency Scottish Court Service Scottish... Ensign of the Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency // The Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency (SFPA) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Government, part of the Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department. ... The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) is the executive agency reporting to the Scottish Executive tasked with managing prisons within Scotland. ... Transport Scotland was created on January 1, 2006 as the national transport agency of Scotland. ...


Two non-Ministerial departments answer directly to Parliament rather than to Ministers:

The Scottish Government is also responsible for a large number of Non-Departmental Public Bodies. These include executive bodies (eg. Scottish Enterprise, the Scottish Qualifications Authority and sportscotland); advisory bodies (eg. the General Teaching Council for Scotland, the Scottish Industrial Development Advisory Board and the Scottish Law Commission); tribunals (eg. the Children’s Panel); and nationalised industries (eg. Scottish Water). Logo of the General Register Office General Register Office for Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that administers the registration of births, deaths, marriages, divorces and adoptions, and is responsible for the statutes relating to the formalities of marriage and conduct of civil marriage. ... The Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive Development Department with responsibilty for the regulation of Scottish charities. ... Scottish public bodies are a group of organisations that are funded by the Scottish Executive. ... Scottish Enterprise is the main national economic development agency of Scotland. ... The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive responsible for the development, accreditation, assessment and certification of qualifications, other than academic degrees, in Scotland. ... sportscotland is the national body for sport in Scotland. ... The General Teaching Council for Scotland is a Scottish public body. ... The Scottish Law Commission is an independent body set up by the Parliament of the United Kingdom in 1965 to keep the law of Scotland under review and recommend necessary reforms to improve, simplify and update Scots law. ... A tribunal is a generic term for any body acting judicially, whether or not it is called a tribunal in its title. ... A Children’s Hearing is part of the legal and welfare systems in Scotland; it aims to combine justice and welfare for children and young people. ... Nationalization (British English: nationalisation) is the act of transferring assets into public ownership. ... Scottish Water is a state-owned company in Scotland that provides water and sewer facilities. ...


Strategic Objectives

In 2007, the Scottish Ministers set for themselves an overall purpose-

"To focus Government and public services on creating a more successful country, with opportunities for all of Scotland to flourish, through increasing sustainable economic growth."

This overall purpose is supported by 5 strategic objectives-

Wealthier and Fairer : Enable businesses and people to increase their wealth and more people to share fairly in that wealth.
Healthier : Help people to sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and faster access to health care.
Safer and Stronger : Help local communities to flourish, becoming stronger, safer place to live, offering improved opportunities and a better quality of life.
Smarter : Expand opportunities for Scots to succeed from nurture through to life long learning ensuring higher and more widely shared achievements.
Greener : Improve Scotland's natural and built environment and the sustainable use and enjoyment of it.

Permanent Secretary

The Permanent Secretary supports the First Minister and Cabinet of Scottish Ministers. The current incumbent is Sir John Elvidge who took over from Sir Muir Russell in 2003. John Elvidge is the most senior civil servant in Scotland and heads the Strategic Board of the Scottish Executive. The Permanent Secretary, in most departments officially titled the Permanent Under-Secretary of State (although the full title is rarely used), is the most senior civil servant of a British Government ministry, charged with running the department on a day-to-day basis. ... The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... This article is about the governmental body. ... Sir John Elvidge KCB is Permanent Secretary to the Scottish Executive. ... Sir Muir Russell KCB DL FRSE is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland. ...


The Permanent Secretary is answerable to the most senior civil servant in the UK, the Cabinet Secretary, for his professional conduct. In the British Government, the Cabinet Secretary, or more formally Secretary of the Cabinet, is the senior civil servant in charge of the Cabinet Office, a department that provides administrative support to the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, and the government as a whole. ...


2007 rebranding

The Scottish Executive's original logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption. The logo was replaced in September 2007, with the name changed to "Scottish Government", and the Flag of Scotland used instead of the Royal Arms.
The Scottish Executive's original logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption. The logo was replaced in September 2007, with the name changed to "Scottish Government", and the Flag of Scotland used instead of the Royal Arms.

In January 2001, the then First Minister Henry McLeish suggested changing the official name of the executive arm from "Scottish Executive" to "Scottish Government". The reaction from the UK Government and from some Labour Party members and Scottish Labour MPs was hostile.[6] Image File history File links Logo of the Scottish Executive. ... Image File history File links Logo of the Scottish Executive. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, a white saltire with an official Pantone 300 coloured field. ... Henry McLeish (born June 15, 1948) is a Scottish politician. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... current new Labour - new Scotland campaign slogan The Scottish Labour Party is the part of the British Labour Party which operates in Scotland. ...


Following the 2007 election politicians from throughout the political spectrum referred to the new administration as the Scottish government and on September 2, 2007 the government announced that the Scottish Executive was to be re-branded as the Scottish Government. The renaming was decided unilaterally by the minority government; as a consequence the SNP was criticised by the three Unionist opposition parties for acting without allowing for parliamentary scrutiny, debate or approval of their plan. The rebranding process has been reported to carry a £100 000 cost.[7] The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ... // Parties represented in the Scottish Parliament (in order of number of representatives): Labour Party - centre-left, unionist - 50 MSPs Scottish National Party (SNP) - centre-left, pro-independence- 27 MSPs Conservative and Unionist Party - centre-right, unionist - 17 MSPs Liberal Democrats - centre-left, federalist - 17 MSPs Scottish Green Party - environmentalist, pro... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Scottish Unionists are those committed to maintaining Scotlands position within the United Kingdom and opposing Scottish nationalism. ...


"Scottish Executive" remains the legal name according to the language of the Scotland Act 1998.[8] Neither the Scottish Executive nor the Scottish Parliament is able to change the legal name, as this would require Westminster to pass an amendment to the Scotland Act. The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ... The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. ...


At the same time that the Scottish Government began to use its new name, a new logo was adopted. The earlier version featured the old name and a version of the Royal Arms for Scotland, but without the motto, the helm, the mantling, the crest, the war-cry above the crest, or the flags of Scotland and England carried by the supporters. In the rendering used, both supporters appeared to be crowned with the Crown of Scotland, whereas in the Royal Arms, the Scottish unicorn is usually shown crowned with the Scottish Crown, and the English lion with the British Imperial State Crown. The Royal Arms as used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A person wearing a helmet. ... In heraldry, mantling is drapery depicted tied to the helmet above the shield. ... In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ... The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, a white saltire with an official Pantone 300 coloured field. ... The Flag of England (5:3) The Flag of England is the St Georges Cross. ... The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... The Crowns modern usage: The Crown of Scotland at the opening of the Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood in 2004. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... The Imperial State Crown is one of the British Crown Jewels. ...


In the September 2007 rebranding, this depiction of the Royal Arms was replaced by one of the flag of Scotland. The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, a white saltire with an official Pantone 300 coloured field. ...


References

  1. ^ About the Scottish Executive, scotland.gov.uk
  2. ^ FM nominates his cabinet, Scottish Executive, 16 May 2007
  3. ^ Scottish Cabinet-related Information, Scottish Executive website
  4. ^ theherald.co.uk
  5. ^ FAQ, scotland.gov.uk
  6. ^ telegraph.co.uk
  7. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/6974798.stm
  8. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/6974798.stm

See also

  • United Kingdom budget
  • Government of Scotland
  • Joint Ministerial Committee
  • Local income tax
  • Council of Economic Advisers (Scotland)
  • Scottish Broadcasting Commission

The United Kingdom budget[1] in the field of Public finance deals with HM Treasury budgeting the revenues gathered by Her Majestys Revenue and Customs and expenditures of public sector departments, in compliance with government policy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Politics of Scotland. ... The Scottish Executive plans to bring forward legislation to replace the council tax with a local income tax (LIT), as part of the funding for Scottish local authorities. ... The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) is a group of economists who advise the Scottish Government. ... The Scottish Broadcasting Commission was established by the Scottish Government in August 2007. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Caithness CWS - Links - Scottish Government (1656 words)
Having the same constituencies for the Scottish Parliament and Westminster is desirable but not essential and should not drive change to the electoral system for the Scottish Parliament.
Scottish Parliament regions should be revised to reflect natural local communities and identity and should be built on local authority areas.
The code of conduct for Members of the Scottish Parliament should be revised to provide a clear and positive role for both constituency and regional members to enhance representation for constituents and improve scrutiny of local and national services.
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