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Encyclopedia > Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party
Conservative & Unionist Party
Conservative Party logo
Leader David Cameron
Founded 1830
Headquarters 25 Victoria Street
London, SW1H 0DL
Political Ideology Conservatism, Neoliberalism
Political Position Centre-right
International Affiliation International Democrat Union
European Affiliation European Democrat Union
European Parliament Group Currently Unaffiliated- trying to form a new coalition
Colours Blue
Website www.conservatives.com
See also Politics of the U.K.

Political parties
Elections Image File history File links New-conservative-logo. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... Conservatism is a philosophy defined by Edmund Burke as a disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve.[1] The term derives from conserve; from Latin conservare, to keep, guard, observe. ... For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism (international relations). ... The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organisations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding extreme right wing beliefs such as fascism. ... The International Democrat Union is an international grouping of conservative and, in some cases, Christian democratic parties. ... The European Democrat Union is the European wing of the International Democrat Union. ... Blue is any of a number of similar colors. ... The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ...

The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. It is the oldest political party in the world, older even than the Democratic Party of the United States. The party's current leader is David Cameron, who as Leader of the Opposition heads the Shadow Cabinet. A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... The Official Loyal Opposition Shadow Cabinet (normally referred to simply as The Shadow Cabinet) is, in British parliamentary practice, a group of members from Her Majestys Loyal Opposition whose job it is to scrutinise their opposite numbers in government and come up with alternative policies. ...


The Conservative Party is descended from the Tory Party, one of the two ruling parties of 18th and 19th Century British Politics, and its members are still commonly referred to as Tories. Though the Conservatives were in government for a substantial part of the 19th and 20th centuries, since losing the 1997 election to the Labour Party under Tony Blair, they have been in opposition in Parliament. The last Conservative Prime Minister was John Major. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service, and MP for Sedgefield. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ...


The Conservatives are a member of the International Democrat Union and its European section. Within the European Parliament they are members of an informal bloc called the European Democrats (ED), which sits in a coalition arrangement with the European Peoples Party (EPP) as the EPP-ED group. Cameron has announced his intention to end the partnership between the Eurosceptic, conservative ED and the more euro-integrationist, Christian Democratic EPP, although the complexity of this move has been criticised by some in the party. The International Democrat Union is an international grouping of conservative and, in some cases, Christian democratic parties. ... The European Democrat Union is the European wing of the International Democrat Union. ... The European Parliament building in Strasbourg The inside of the building The European Parliament (formerly European Parliamentary Assembly) is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... Logo of the European Peoples Party The European Peoples Party is a Christian democrat-conservative political party at European level founded in 1976. ... The European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats is a group in the European Parliament. ... Euroscepticism is scepticism about, or disagreement with, the purposes of the European Union, sometimes coupled with a desire to preserve national sovereignty. ... Christian Democracy is a political ideology, born at the end of the 19th century, largely as a result of the papal encyclical Rerum Novarum of Pope Leo XIII, in which the Vatican recognizes workers misery and agrees that something should be done about it, in reaction to the rise of...

Contents


Name

The Party's official, though infrequently used, name is The Conservative and Unionist Party. This formal name is a hangover from the 1894 merger with the Liberal Unionist Party, and an echo of the party's defence (1886-1921) of what they then saw as the need to maintain the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. During this period the party and its allies were often referred to as the "Unionist Party". Following the establishment of the Irish Free State, "Conservative" came back into prominence in England and Wales, though "Unionist" remained, referring to the Party's support for British sovereignty in Northern Ireland in opposition to Irish nationalist and republican aspirations. In Scotland the Scottish Unionist Party, who were independent of the Conservative and Unionist Party until 1965, were the main face of the party. Similarly the Ulster Unionist Party supported the Conservatives for many decades in the House of Commons and took the Conservative whip. However, and in contrast to Scotland, this arrangement broke down in the aftermath of the imposition of direct rule in Northern Ireland in 1972. Even today there is a variation of views in the Conservative Party on the Northern Ireland "question". A number of affiliated Conservative organisations, such as the grouping of Conservative electoral agents, also style themselves Conservative and Unionist. The Liberal Unionists were a British political party which split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century, the formal merger being completed in 1912. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital London Head of State King or Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Head of Government Prime Minister Parliament House of Commons, House of Lords This article is about the historical state called the... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) (1922–1937) was the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties that were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British and... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... The Scottish Unionist Party is a name of two organisations, one now subsumed into the UK Conservative Party, and the other being a recent creation in response to the Conservative Partys support of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


The internal organisation of the Conservative Party is a contrast between constituency parties who dominate in the selection of candidates and election of party leaders, and a central administration (Conservative Central Office) which leads in the financing and organisation of elections. The party in Parliament and the leader of the party provide the core of daily political activity, and form policy in consultation with the central administration. As with Labour, party membership has long been declining and often falls below 100 in parliamentary seats where a Conservative candidate is unlikely ever to be elected. Nevertheless, following the dramatic decline in membership of the Labour party in the last ten years, and a recent rise in Conservative party membership following the election of David Cameron as party leader, the Conservative party now has more members (around 300,000) than the Labour Party and Liberal Democrats combined (around 200,000 and 70,000 respectively).


According to accounts filed with the Electoral Commission it had income in the year ending 31 December 2004 of about £20 million and expenditure of about £26 million (see [1]). The Electorial Commission is an independent body with powers in the United Kingdom, which was created by an Act of Parliament, the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The electoral symbol of the Conservative party is a hand holding a torch. Its present motto, adopted by the Party on 6 December 2005, is "Change to Win – Win for Britain". This replaces the previous slogan, "Today's Britain Tomorrow's Conservatives". The official party colours are red, white and blue, though blue is most generally associated with the party in contrast to the red of the Labour Party. The colour blue also influences the wardrobe choices of female Conservative politicians, such as former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Brief history

Main articles: History of the Conservative Party and Leaders of the Conservative Party
Benjamin DisraeliPrime Minister 1868, 1874-80
Benjamin Disraeli
Prime Minister 1868, 1874-80

The origins of the Conservative Party go back to the Tory faction of 1678-1681 which opposed the exclusion of the Duke of York, later King James VII&II, from the order of succession to the throne. The term 'Conservative' was first used by George Canning in the 1820s and was suggested as a title for the party by John Wilson Croker in the 1830s and later officially adopted under the aegis of Sir Robert Peel, but the party is still often referred to as the 'Tory Party' (not least because newspaper editors find it a convenient shorthand when space is limited). The Tories more often than not formed the government from the accession of King George III (in 1760) until the Great Reform Act of 1832. The origins of the Conservative Party go back to the Tory faction of 1678-1681 which opposed the exclusion of the Duke of York, later King James VII&II, from the order of succession to the throne. ... Leaders of the Conservative Party since 1834. ... Download high resolution version (500x605, 87 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (500x605, 87 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Exclusion Bill crisis ran from 1678 till 1681. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... George Canning (April 11, 1770 - August 8, 1827) was a British politician who served as Foreign Secretary and, briefly, Prime Minister. ... John Wilson Croker (December 20, 1780 - August 10, 1857) was a British statesman and author. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... The Reform Act of 1832 (known also as the Great Reform Act and The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832) introduced wide-ranging changes to electoral franchise legislation in the United Kingdom. ...


The widening of the franchise in the 19th century forced the party to popularise its approach, especially under Lord Derby and Benjamin Disraeli who carried through their own Reform Act in 1868. After 1886, the Conservatives were allied with Liberal Unionists who opposed their own party's support for Irish Home Rule, and held office under Lord Salisbury for all but three of the following twenty years. But when it split over tariff reform, the party suffered a landslide election defeat. Arms of Edward Smith-Stanley Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, KG, PC (March 29, 1799 - October 23, 1869) was a British statesman, three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and is to date the longest serving leader of the Conservative Party. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was an English statesman and literary figure. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party (the SDP) to form a new party which would become... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... The Most Honourable Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830–22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ...


An all-party coalition was created in World War I, and the Conservatives then stayed in coalition with half of the Liberals for four years after the armistice. Eventually, grassroots pressure forced the breakup of the Coalition, and the party regained power on its own. It again dominated the political scene in the inter-war period, albeit from 1931 in a 'National Government' coalition. However in the 1945 general election, the party lost power in a landslide to the Labour Party. The Conservatives accepted the reality of the Labour government's creation of the 'welfare state' and nationalisation programme but, in government, both Winston Churchill and later Harold Macmillan continued to promote liberal trade regulations and a lack of State involvement up until the economic boom of the 1950s. Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... In the United Kingdom the term National Government is in an abstract sense used to refer to a coalition of some or all major political parties. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ...


The Heath government of 1970 - 1974 was, amongst other things, notable for taking Britain into the European Economic Community. This was something which Harold Macmillan had tried but failed to achieve, and a decision that would have a significant effect on the party over subsequent decades. Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Right Honourable Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894–29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ...


In 1975, Margaret Thatcher became leader of the party. Under her leadership, after her victory in the 1979 general election, the party pursued, albeit briefly, a monetarist economic programme. More generally, the party adopted a rigorous free-market approach to government and focussed on the privatisation of public utilities. Here, from the Conservative viewpoint, the party experienced a high-point as Thatcher led the Conservatives to two landslide election victories in 1983 and 1987. However, she was also deeply unpopular in some sections of society, initially for the massive unemployment caused by the monetarist economic reforms, and later for what was seen as a heavy-handed response to issues such as the Miners' strike. However it was Thatcher's introduction of the Community Charge, known by its opponents as the poll tax, which was perhaps her downfall. Her increasing unpopularity due to the aforementioned tax and her unwillingness to change such policies that were perceived as vote-losing, allowed internal tensions over European policy to lead to her being deposed in 1990. Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... Monetarism is a set of views concerning the determination of national income and monetary economics. ... The miners strike of 1984-5 was a major piece of industrial action affecting the British coal industry. ... A poll tax, head tax, soul tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ...


Margaret Thatcher was replaced by John Major, who won an unexpected election victory in 1992. Major's government suffered but a brief honeymoon period as Pound Sterling was forced out of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism later that year. Additionally, around this time, approximately one million householders faced repossession of their homes because of increasing unemployment. The party subsequently lost much of its reputation for good financial stewardship and it was increasingly accused in the media of sleaze. Perhaps inevitably an effective opposition campaign by the Labour Party led to a landslide defeat in 1997, Labour's largest ever parliamentary victory. Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... GBP redirects here. ... The European exchange rate mechanisms (or ERM) was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange-rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for Economic and Monetary Union and the introduction of a single... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Politics of the United Kingdom. ...


In recent years William Hague, leader of the party from 1997 to 2001, portrayed himself at first as a 'moderniser' with a common touch. However by the time of the 2001 general election, he had changed focus to concentrate on a more hard-right agenda; Europe, asylum seekers and tax cuts whilst declaring that only the Conservative Party could "Save the Pound". He was seen as a political lightweight by many, and was widely mocked for his claim that he drank 14 imperial pints (8 litres) of beer in a day in his youth. Despite a low turnout, the election resulted in a net gain of just a single seat for the Conservative Party and William Hague's resignation as party leader. William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ...


Following Hague as leader Iain Duncan Smith (2001-2003) (often known as IDS) was a strong Eurosceptic. But Euroscepticism did not define Duncan Smith's leadership - indeed it was during his tenure that Europe ceased to be an issue of division in the party as it united behind calls for a referendum on the proposed European Union Constitution. Duncan Smith's Shadow Cabinet contained many new and unfamiliar faces but despite predictions by some that the party would lurch to the right the team instead followed a largely pragmatic and moderate approach to policy. However, before ever facing the public at a general election, after losing a vote of confidence, Duncan Smith was ultimately replaced as leader by Michael Howard, Member of Parliament (MP) for Folkestone and Hythe, who was elected to the post, as the only candidate, on 6 November 2003. Rt. ... It has been suggested that Eurorealism be merged into this article or section. ... The Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe is a proposed constitutional treaty for the European Union. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... The Rt. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Map sources for Folkestone at grid reference TR2236 Folkestone Harbour, picture taken from the golf court Folkestone (pronounced fōkstun) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... Map sources for Hythe at grid reference TR158350 The small seaside resort and town of Hythe, in the District of Shepway, (derived from sheep-way, since shepherds drove their flocks across Romney Marsh and the Downs) is one of the five original Cinque Ports on the south coast of Kent... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As leader, Howard almost immediately announced radical changes to the way the Shadow Cabinet would work. He slashed the number of members by half, with Theresa May and Tim Yeo each shadowing two government departments. Minor departments still have shadows but have been removed from the cabinet and the post of Shadow Leader of the House of Commons was abolished. The role of party chairman was also split into two, with Lord Saatchi responsible for the party machine, and Liam Fox handling publicity. Michael Portillo was offered a position but refused, ostensibly due to his plans to step down from Parliament at the next election. Theresa May The Right Honourable Theresa Mary May (born in Eastbourne, Sussex on October 1, 1956 as Theresa Mary Brasier) is a British politician, former chairman of the Conservative Party, and Member of Parliament for Maidenhead. ... Tim Yeo Timothy Stephen Kenneth Yeo MP (born March 20, 1945) is a British Conservative politician, Member of Parliament for South Suffolk. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Lord Saatchi Maurice Saatchi, Baron Saatchi, born June 21, 1946 is the co-founder of advertising agencies Saatchi and Saatchi and M&C Saatchi. ... Conservative MP Liam Fox Dr Liam Fox (born September 22, 1961) is a UK Conservative politician, currently Shadow Defence Secretary and Member of Parliament for Woodspring. ... The Right Honourable Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative politician. ...


Under Howard, in the 2005 general election, the Conservative Party made a very slight recovery, increasing their share of the vote by around 0.6% (up to 32.3%). However, due to a large fall in the Labour vote and tactical unwind by Liberal Democrat voters (many of whom were no longer willing to back the Labour Party in Labour vs. Conservative marginal seats), the Conservatives made a net gain of 33 seats. This helped reduce the Labour majority from 167 seats down to 66, and made the Conservatives the largest party in England in terms of vote share. The day after the election, on May 6, Howard announced that he believed himself too old to lead the party into another election campaign, and he would therefore be stepping down to allow a new leader the time to prepare for the next election. Howard said that he believed that the party needed to amend the rules governing the election of the Party leader, and that he would allow time for that to happen before resigning. Barring a change in the law, the next general election in the United Kingdom must be held some time before June 30, 2006. ... In voting systems, tactical voting (or strategic voting) occurs when a voter misrepresents his or her sincere preferences in order to gain a more favorable outcome. ... Liberal democracy is a form of representative democracy where elected representatives that hold the decision power are moderated by a constitution that emphasizes protecting individual liberties and the rights of minorities in society, such as freedom of speech and assembly, freedom of religion, the right to private property and privacy... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ...

Further information: Conservative Party (UK) leadership election, 2005

David Cameron won the subsequent leadership campaign. Cameron beat his closest rival, David Davis, by a margin of more than two to one, taking 134,446 votes to 64,398, and has announced his intention to reform and realign the Conservative Party in a manner similar to that achieved by the Labour Party in opposition under Tony Blair. British opinion polls have since begun to indicate a small but perhaps significant swing in the Conservatives' favour, often putting Cameron ahead of either Prime Minister Blair or Blair's most likely successor Gordon Brown at a future General Election. The 2005 Conservative leadership election was announced by party leader Michael Howard on May 6, 2005, when he announced that he would be stepping down as leader in the near future. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... David Michael Davis(born December 23, 1948) is a Britishpolitician, ConservativeMPfor Haltemprice and Howdenand ShadowHome Secretary. ... James Gordon Brown, Ph. ...


The Conservative Party today

David Cameron, leader of the Conservative party
David Cameron, leader of the Conservative party

The Conservative party, as the largest in the British Parliament after the Labour Party, provides the Official Opposition to the Labour Government of Tony Blair. Labour currently holds a 64-member majority in the House of Commons, with 353 Members of Parliament; the Conservatives provide 196 Members of Parliament and the Liberal Democrats follow with 63 Members. Image File history File links David_Cameron_. ... Image File history File links David_Cameron_. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Official Opposition (more formally, Her Majestys Loyal Opposition) in the United Kingdom is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the government. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ...


Policies

Conservative Party policies are generally supportive of reduced government intervention in most matters of state, in particular in the economic sphere (e.g., through tax cuts and privatisations). But they do support increased government intervention in certain aspects the social or cultural sphere (e.g., through the defence of the traditional family and through restrictions on immigration). Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ...


Today, they are also noted for their broadly Eurosceptic stance. Many commentators believe that their failures in UK politics from 1997 were partly the result of continued internal tension between Europhiles (such as Kenneth Clarke and Michael Heseltine) and Eurosceptics (such as John Redwood and William Hague). However, the Conservative party has in recent years largely come to terms with these issues, or has at least ceased to argue quite as publicly over what undoubtedly remains a contentious issue within the Party. Consecutive Conservative Party Leaders have pleaded for their MPs to unite behind them over the issue of Europe and it would appear that, for the time being at least, this plea is being heeded. Even the archetypal pro-European, Kenneth Clarke, has reluctantly accepted the party line on this contentious issue. It has been suggested that Eurorealism be merged into this article or section. ... Kenneth Clarke The Right Honourable Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Heseltine walks out of the cabinet meeting having resigned, January 9, 1986 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... John Redwood The Right Honourable Dr. John Alan Redwood (born June 15, 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Wokingham and formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Deregulation in the Shadow Cabinet. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Kenneth Clarke The Right Honourable Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ...


Following the election of David Cameron as leader, the party has increasingly focussed on environmental policies, a stance which has drawn fire from other parties and some sections of the media who perceive this change in focus to be merely cosmetic in nature, given the Party's traditional focus on economic growth. David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ...


Conservatives are also opposed to devolution to the national and English regions of the UK, preferring a unitary centralised state. They opposed devolution to Wales and Scotland in 1999, whilst supporting it for Northern Ireland. They also did not support the unsuccessful attempt at devolution of power to North East England in 2004. However, since the New Labour government introduced devolution the Conservatives have pledged not to reverse the situation to its pre-1997 status. For devolution as a term sometimes misapplied to evolution, see devolution (fallacy) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... North East England is one of the regions of England. ...


Economic policy

During much of the twentieth century the Conservative Party was considered the "natural party of government", a position in part founded upon the party's reputation for pragmatism and economic competence. The contrast with Labour's perceived poor twentieth-century record remained strong, even as the Conservative governments of the 1980s presided over mass unemployment on a scale which had not been seen since the 1930s. (Peaking nationally at 11% in 1986). The party's economic reputation was, however, dealt a blow by the 1992 Black Wednesday debacle, in which billions of pounds were spent trying to keep the pound within the European ERM system of exchange rates at an overvalued rate. This, combined with the deep recession of the early 1990s, allowed Tony Blair and Gordon Brown to claim, from the Conservatives, the mantle of economic competence. Many on both the left and right have since argued that New Labour's embrace of market forces and public sector modernisation amounted to little more than stealing the Conservative Party's economic clothes. In British politics and economics, Black Wednesday refers to September 16, 1992 when the government was forced to withdraw the Pound from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) by currency speculators—most notably George Soros who earned over US$1 billion in doing so. ... erm- when parker is correcting someone with incredible delight at how incredibly smart she is and how incredibly sutpid you are! ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service, and MP for Sedgefield. ... James Gordon Brown, Ph. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ...


Though the Thatcherite reforms of the 1980s, which sought to lower rising inflation by radical measures and which led in part to higher unemployment, reversed a situation in Britain of relative economic decline, the Conservatives have yet to regain their reputation for economic competence. As a result of the dominance of the Labour Party in debates over economic policy, recent Conservative election campaigns have focused much more on low-salience social or cultural issues such as crime, immigration and asylum. The party has now pledged to match Labour spending plans - a reverse of the situation in 1997. The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... A refugee is a person seeking asylum in a foreign country in order to escape persecution. ...


Following the 1997 general election, the Conservative Party opposed Labour's flagship policy for economic stability: the decision to commit the Bank of England to a goal of low and stable inflation, and to grant it independent control of interest rates to meet this target. Economists had long advocated independent central banks as a means of depoliticising monetary policy and overcoming the problem of time inconsistency (a situation in game theory which shows how a policymaker who cares about both low unemployment and low inflation will achieve neither). Moreover, in the 1990s, a number of countries (e.g., New Zealand) pursued such reforms to great effect. However, the Conservatives opposed Bank of England independence, which they felt was a prelude to British membership of the European single currency. They also expressed concern over the removal of monetary policy from democratic control. In the end though, the popularity of this policy amongst economists and the financial community, along with its success at keeping down inflation, has led the Conservatives to renege on their initial opposition and embrace Labour's reform. The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The nearest London Underground station is Bank station. ... Monetary policy is the government or central bank process of managing money supply to achieve specific goals—such as constraining inflation, achieving full employment or economic growth. ... In game theory and economics, dynamic inconsistency, or time inconsistency is situation in a dynamic game, where a players best plan for some future period will not be optimal when that future period arrives; The plan is inconsistent over time. ... Game theory is a branch of applied mathematics that studies strategic situations where players choose different actions in an attempt to maximize their returns. ...


The Conservative Party remains committed in principle to a programme of cuts in direct taxation, part of the intellectual legacy of the Thatcher years. Newly elected leader David Cameron has said that the country needed a "dynamic and competitive economy" but, in a significant move for the party, he has also argued that the proceeds of any growth should be shared between both "tax reduction and extra public investment".


Aside from tax cuts, the most notable Conservative economic policy of recent years has probably been opposition to the European single currency. Anticipating the growing euroscepticism within his party, John Major negotiated a British opt-out from the single currency in the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, although several members of Major's cabinet (Kenneth Clarke, Michael Heseltine and Stephen Dorrell) were personally supportive of EMU participation. Following Major's resignation after the 1997 defeat, the Conservatives have had a succession of leaders (William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith, Michael Howard and David Cameron) from the eurosceptic wing of British politics, and these men have positioned the party firmly against future EMU integration. This policy appears to be broadly in-line with the mood of the British electorate although voters typically rank Europe as a low importance issue next to education or healthcare, partly explaining why the Conservatives have been unable to convert their most popular policy into actual votes. The euro (plural euro--but note linguistic issues concerning the euro, symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the official currency of the European Union and single currency for over 300 million Europeans in the following twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands... It has been suggested that Eurorealism be merged into this article or section. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993, under the Delors Commission. ... Kenneth Clarke The Right Honourable Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Heseltine walks out of the cabinet meeting having resigned, January 9, 1986 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... The Right Honourable Stephen James Dorrell (born March 25, 1952) is an English politician and Conservative Member of Parliament for Charnwood. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Rt. ... The Rt. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ...


Social policy

Scarborough Conservative Club.
Scarborough Conservative Club.

The Conservative Party has historically been associated with social conservatism, views which have often been reflected in both the party's social and socio-economic policies, such as section 28, benefit cuts for single mothers and the removal of the link between pensions and earnings. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 553 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Conservative Party (UK) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 553 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Conservative Party (UK) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28. ...


In recent years, many Conservative 'modernisers' have claimed that the traditional, somewhat authoritarian nature of such policies played a major role in the decline of the party in the 1990s and early 2000s. For example, David Willetts has criticised what he termed "the war on single parents", whilst former Conservative Party Chairman Brian Mawhinney observed that the party had "created the impression that if you weren't in a traditional nuclear family, then we weren't interested in you". Thus since 1997 a debate has raged within the party between 'modernisers' such as Michael Portillo, who believe that the Conservatives should change their social views in line with 21st century Britain, and 'traditionalists' such as William Hague and David Davis, who argue that the party should stick to its traditional conservative social agenda. During this period the Conservative Party grassroots have pushed in the latter direction, helping the right wing of the party win many of these political battles. This resulted in William Hague's and Michael Howard's pre-election swings to the right (in 2001 and 2005, respectively), and the election of the stop-Ken Clarke candidate Iain Duncan Smith in 2001. Theresa May famously remarked that the result of all this was that the Conservatives were perceived as "the nasty party". David Willetts David Lindsay Willetts (born March 9, 1956) is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Havant, in the United Kingdom. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Right Honourable Brian Stanley Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney, PC (born 26 July 1940) is a British politician. ... The Right Honourable Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative politician. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... David Michael Davis(born December 23, 1948) is a Britishpolitician, ConservativeMPfor Haltemprice and Howdenand ShadowHome Secretary. ... This article is about Kenneth Clarke the politician, not Kenneth Clark the art historian. ... Rt. ... Theresa May The Right Honourable Theresa Mary May (born in Eastbourne, Sussex on October 1, 1956 as Theresa Mary Brasier) is a British politician, former chairman of the Conservative Party, and Member of Parliament for Maidenhead. ...


However, since the election of Cameron as leader of the party, the 'modernisers' appear to have been given more of a voice on social policy. For example, the 2005 election saw the first black Conservative MP, Adam Afriyie, elected in Windsor. (This contrasts positively with the situation in Cheltenham thirteen years earlier, when the black Conservative candidate John Taylor was defeated defending a marginal Conservative seat, allegedly due to the unwillingness of local Conservative voters to support a non-white candidate). Conservative modernisers point to Afriyie's election as evidence that the party is changing, though opponents argue that the election of a single black MP doesn't count for much against the perceived right-wing anti-immigrant campaign fought by the Conservatives in 2005. Adam Afriyie (born 4 August 1965, Wimbledon, London), British politician, is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Windsor. ... Windsor is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Cheltenham is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... John David Beckett Taylor, Baron Taylor of Warwick (born 1952) is a British politician and Conservative member of the House of Lords. ...


Such changes in official Conservative Party attitude have not been universally welcomed. The prominent conservative journalist Peter Hitchens has described them as "useless", for what he sees as their persistent acquiescence to prevailing liberal orthodoxy. Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta GC) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ...


Foreign policy

For much of the 20th century the Conservative party has taken a broadly Atlanticist stance in relations with the United States favouring close ties with the United States and a range of other similarly-aligned nations such as Canada, Australia and Japan. The Conservatives have generally favoured a diverse range of international alliances, ranging from North Atlantic Treaty Organization to the Commonwealth of Nations. Atlanticism is a philosophy of cooperation among European and North American nations regarding political, economic, and defense issues. ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of 53 independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ...


Close US-British relations have been an element of Conservative foreign policy for over half a century. Winston Churchill, in his post-war ministry (1951-1955), built up a strong relationship with the Eisenhower Administration in the US. Harold Macmillan demonstrated a similarly close relationship with the following Democratic administration of J.F. Kennedy. Though the US-British relationship in foreign affairs has often been termed a 'Special Relationship', a term coined by Winston Churchill, this has often been observed most clearly where leaders in each country are of a similar political stripe. Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher built a close relationship with American President Ronald Reagan in his opposition to the former Soviet Union, but John Major was largely unsuccessful in his personal contacts with former Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton. Out of power and perceived as largely irrelevant, recent Conservative leaders have struggled to forge personal relationships with US Presidents. The strong bilateral relationship between George W. Bush and Tony Blair would likely remain should Cameron or another Conservative leader take power alongside a Republican US President, or alongside a Democratic President with a similar view on international affairs. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Herbert Walker Bush, Hon GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former governor of Texas. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ...


As a direct result of the party's strong commitment to an Atlanticist and free-market foreign policy, no subject has more divided the Conservative Party in recent history than the UK's relations with the European Union (EU). Though the principal architect of Britain’s entry into the then-Common Market (later European Community and European Union) was Conservative PM Edward Heath, and both Winston Churchill and Harold MacMillan were in favour of some form of European union, the bulk of contemporary Conservative opinion is opposed to closer economic and particularly political relations with Europe. Divisions on Europe came to the fore under the premiership of John Major (1990-1997) when the slow process of integration within the EU forced tensions to the surface; a hard core of Eurosceptic Members of Parliament took advantage of the small Conservative majority in Parliament to oppose Government policy on the Maastricht Treaty and, by so doing, undermined the Government's credibility. The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician and author, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... The Right Honourable Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894–29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... It has been suggested that Eurorealism be merged into this article or section. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993, under the Delors Commission. ...


In recent years the Conservative Party has become more clearly Eurosceptic as the Labour Government has found itself unable to make a positive case for further integration and as Eurosceptic or pro-withdrawal parties such as the United Kingdom Independence Party have made strong showings in UK elections to the European Parliament. Though providing little clear benefit in recent parliamentary elections, the Conservative Party has adopted a policy on Europe (supported by the new Conservative leader David Cameron and his equally Eurosceptic Foreign Affairs spokesman William Hague) which would include the renegotiation of key EU treaties and the return of a number of powers back to the UK; opinion polls generally identify Conservative policy on Europe as closer to public opinion than that of either the Labour or Liberal Democrat parties. The degree to which a Conservative Government could implement policy on Europe would depend directly on the willingness of other EU member states to agree to such policies. Much could rest on the potential threat or risk of British withdrawal from the EU should other states prove unwilling. The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ...


Beyond relations with the United States, Commonwealth and the EU, the Conservative Party has generally supported a pro-free trade foreign policy within the mainstream of international affairs. The degree to which Conservative Governments have supported interventionist or non-interventionist Presidents in the US has often varied with the personal relations between US President and British Prime Minister.


Local elections 2006 - a Conservative revival?

On 4 May 2006, the voters cast their votes in the 2006 local elections. Labour Party lost control of 18 councils, the Liberal Democrats gained one, and the Conservatives won control of 11, including the council of Ealing, which is often seen as a "bellwether" for the General Election - since the Second World War, the party that gained control of Ealing Council has won the next General Election on every occasion bar one. At the end of the count, the Conservatives gained 316 new Councillors, the Liberal Democrats gained only two and Labour lost a total of 319. May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Local government elections took place in England (only) on Thursday May 4, 2006. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Ealing is a place in the London Borough of Ealing. ... In politics, a bellwether (often, incorrectly, bellweather or bellwhether) is a region whose political tendencies match in microcosm what occurs in a wider area. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The elections were overshadowed by various troubles within the Labour party; an on-going police investigation into alleged "cash for peerages" ([2]), Deputy Prime minister John Prescott's affair ([3]), and Charles Clarke's release of over 1000 foreign detainees without considering them for deportation (see [4]). This helped the Tories, who are now hoping for further victories before the next UK general election, scheduled for 2009 or 2010. John Leslie Prescott (born May 31, 1938) is a British Labour Party politician who is Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and MP for Hull East. ... The Rt Hon. ...


Furthermore, a Populus voting intention poll for The Times following the local elections on 9 May 2006 suggests that any revival may be continuing, showing the Tories on 38%, a full eight points above Labour on 30% of the projected vote. For the first time, David Cameron was also viewed by more voters as a potential Prime Minister when compared with Chancellor Gordon Brown.


Internal factions

There are three main political factions within the modern Conservative Party:


Although One Nation Conservatives were the dominant faction for most of the post-war era, providing Conservative Prime Ministers such as Harold MacMillan (1957 - 1963) and Edward Heath (1970 - 1974), the name itself comes from a famous phrase of Benjamin Disraeli. The basis of One Nation Conservatism is a belief in social cohesion, and its adherents support social institutions that maintain harmony between people of different classes (and more recently, people of different races or religions). These institutions have typically included the welfare state, the BBC, and local government. One Nation Conservatives are usually seen as being socially liberal, since tolerance is viewed as an important factor in social cohesion. Many are also supporters of the European Union, perhaps stemming from an extension of the cohesion principle to the international level, though some are strongly hostile to the EU (such as Sir Peter Tapsell). Prominent One Nation Conservatives in the contemporary party include Kenneth Clarke, Malcolm Rifkind and Damian Green, and the faction is associated with the internal pressure group, the Tory Reform Group. One Nation, One Nation Conservatism, or Tory Democracy is a term used in political debate in the United Kingdom and sometimes Canada to refer to the moderate wing of the Conservative Party, and the Red Tory wing of the original Progressive Conservative Party in Canada who like to describe themselves... The Right Honourable Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894–29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was an English statesman and literary figure. ... It has been suggested that Welfare capitalism be merged into this article or section. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world. ... Sir Peter Hannay Bailey Tapsell (born 1 February 1930, Hove) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Kenneth Clarke The Right Honourable Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Sir Malcolm Leslie Rifkind, KCMG, QC (born 21 June 1946) is a UK Conservative politician and Member of Parliament for the constituency of Kensington and Chelsea. ... Damian Howard Green (born January 17, 1956) is an English Conservative Party (UK) politician, and Member of Parliament for Ashford (UK Parliament constituency) in Kent. ... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ...


An allied but minority group of Conservatives could be said to belong to a Libertarian or social-liberal wing. This faction, which includes Alan Duncan and Peter Lilley, calls for the combining of social freedom with economic freedoms. In Alan Duncan's book Saturn's Children (1995), the MP called for all drugs to be legalised. Libertarianism is a political philosophy[1] advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ...


The second main faction in the Conservative party is the Thatcherite wing. This wing of the party achieved dominance after the election of Margaret Thatcher as party leader in 1975. The Thatcherite political agenda is mainly concerned with reducing the role of the government in the economy, and to this end they support tax cuts, privatisation of public services and a reduction in the size of the welfare state. On social policy matters are not so clear cut as although Thatcher herself was socially conservative, her supporters harbour a range of social opinions from the liberal views of Michael Portillo to the traditional conservatism of William Hague and David Davis. Many, but not all, Thatcherites are Eurosceptic, since they view many European regulations as unwelcome interference in the market. Thatcherite europhiles include Leon Brittan and Quentin Davies. Many take inspiration from Thatcher's famous anti-EU Bruges speech in 1988, in which she declared that "we have not successfully rolled back the frontiers of the state in Britain, only to see them reimposed at a European level". Thatcherites also tend to be Atlanticist, dating back to the close friendship between Thatcher and US President Ronald Reagan. The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) is a British politician and the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, a position she held from 1979 to 1990. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... The Right Honourable Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative politician. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... David Michael Davis(born December 23, 1948) is a Britishpolitician, ConservativeMPfor Haltemprice and Howdenand ShadowHome Secretary. ... Euroscepticism is scepticism about, or disagreement with, the purposes of the European Union, sometimes coupled with a desire to preserve national sovereignty. ... Sir Leon Brittan, Rt. ... (John) Quentin Davies (born May 29, 1944) British politician He is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Grantham and Stamford. ... Atlanticism is a philosophy of cooperation among European and North American nations regarding political, economic, and defense issues. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


The so-called Faith, Flag and Family wing are the third main element within the Conservative Party. This faction's name is drawn from its support for three British social institutions: the established Church, the unitary British state and the traditional family. To this end, they emphasise Britain's Protestant heritage, they oppose any transfer of power away from the state (either downwards to the nations and regions or upwards to the European Union), and they are highly critical of homosexuals, single parents and other non-traditional family groupings. They are strongly opposed to immigration into the UK, and some have in the past professed racist opinions. They also are known for their support for capital punishment. Prominent MPs from this wing of the party include Andrew Rosindell and Edward Leigh - himself a prominent Roman Catholic, notable in a faction marked out by its support for the established Church of England, as mentioned above. It should be noted however that although this faction has never been particularly strong within the parliamentary party, its strength within the rank-and-file party membership means that it has wielded considerable power over Conservative social policy. Gay Conservative MP Alan Duncan famously once referred to this wing as a "Taleban tendency" within the party. Historically, many Conservatives from this faction were members of the Conservative Monday Club, and more recently they have participated in the Cornerstone Group. Roger Scruton, a conservative philosopher, is a good example of this group; his writing rarely touches on the economy, but comments on providing a conservative perspective on social issues. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... A map showing the unitary states. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Andrew Richard Rosindell (born March 17, 1966) is a British Conservative Member of Parliament for Romford, and a Vice-Chairman of the Conservative Party. ... Edward Julian Egerton Leigh (born 20 July 1950) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Alan James Carter Duncan MP (born March 31, 1957) is a British Conservative politician, and Member of Parliament for Rutland and Melton. ... Flag flown by the Taliban. ... The Conservative Monday Club (widely known as The Monday Club) is a British right-wing pressure-group with its origins in the Conservative Party. ... The Cornerstone Group is a socially conservative or traditionalist political faction within the British Conservative Party consisting of Eurosceptic, traditionalist MPs. ... Professor Roger Vernon Scruton (born 27 February 1944) is a leading British academic philosopher, and founder of Claridge Press. ...


Sometimes two factions will unite to oppose another. For instance both Thatcherite and Cornerstone factions rebelled over Europe (and in particular Maastricht) during John Major's premiership, whilst Cornerstone and One Nation MPs united to inflict Margaret Thatchers only defeat in parliament, over Sunday trading. Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ...


Note that not all Conservative MPs can be easily placed within one of the above groupings. For example, John Major was the ostensibly "Thatcherite" candidate during the 1990 leadership election, but he consistently promoted One Nation Conservatives to the higher reaches of his cabinet during his time as Prime Minister. These included Kenneth Clarke (Chancellor of the Exchequer) and Michael Heseltine (Deputy Prime Minister). The 1990 Conservative Party leadership election in the United Kingdom took place in November 1990 following the decision of former Trade and Industry Secretary Michael Heseltine to stand against the incumbent Conservative leader and Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. ... Kenneth Clarke The Right Honourable Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Heseltine walks out of the cabinet meeting having resigned, January 9, 1986 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ...


There is also a significant group which combines many different elements of the above; the so-called 'modernisers' currently led by David Cameron. Their conservatism combines traditional conservatism with green politics, social-liberalism, a belief in social justice, an internationalist concern for global poverty and euroscepticism.


Associated groups

Further information: List of organisations associated with the British Conservative Party

This is a list of organisations that are associated with the British Conservative Party. ... The Bow Group is the oldest centre-right think tank in the United Kingdom. ... The Bruges Group is a euro-sceptic think tank associated with the British Conservative Party. ... The Centre for Policy Studies is a United Kingdom-based think tank. ... The Conservative Research Department (CRD) is an integral part of the central organisation of the Conservative Party of the United Kingdom. ... Conservative Way Forward is a group within the British Conservative Party. ... The Cornerstone Group is a socially conservative or traditionalist political faction within the British Conservative Party consisting of Eurosceptic, traditionalist MPs. ... The European Foundation is a leading Eurosceptic think tank based in the United Kingdom. ... The Freedom Association is a right-wing British pressure group. ... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ... The ...

See also

List of Conservative Party politicians This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Leaders of the Conservative Party since 1834. ... In the United Kingdom, the Chairman of the Conservative Party is responsible for running the party machine, overseeing Conservative Central Office. ... Conservative Central Office (CCO) is the headquarters of the British Conservative Party, housing its central staff and committee members. ... The Conservative Research Department (CRD) is an integral part of the central organisation of the Conservative Party of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. ... It has been suggested that Eurorealism be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... The Official Loyal Opposition Shadow Cabinet (normally referred to simply as The Shadow Cabinet) is, in British parliamentary practice, a group of members from Her Majestys Loyal Opposition whose job it is to scrutinise their opposite numbers in government and come up with alternative policies. ... The Scottish Unionist Party is a name of two organisations, one now subsumed into the UK Conservative Party, and the other being a recent creation in response to the Conservative Partys support of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. ...

Further reading

  • Geoffrey Wheatcroft (2005), The Strange Death of Tory England

External links

Official party sites

  • The Conservative Party
  • The Scottish Conservative & Unionist Party
  • Welsh Conservatives
  • Conservatives in Northern Ireland
  • Conservative Future - party youth wing

Internal party policy groups

Other

Leaders of the Conservative Party
The Duke of Wellington, Sir Robert Peel, The Earl of Derby, Benjamin Disraeli, The Marquess of Salisbury, Arthur Balfour, Andrew Bonar Law, Stanley Baldwin, Neville Chamberlain, Winston Churchill, Anthony Eden, Harold Macmillan, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, Edward Heath, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith, Michael Howard, David Cameron
Political parties in the United Kingdom
Represented in the House of Commons (646) :

Labour (356) | Conservatives (197) | Liberal Democrats (63) | DUP (9) | SNP (6) | Sinn Féin (abstentionist) (5) | Plaid Cymru (3) | SDLP (3) | Ind KHHC (1) | Respect (1) | UUP (1) | Vacant (1) Leaders of the Conservative Party since 1834. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (720x1024, 77 KB) Summary The logo of the Conservative Party. ... Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Arms of Edward Smith-Stanley Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, KG, PC (March 29, 1799 - October 23, 1869) was a British statesman, three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and is to date the longest serving leader of the Conservative Party. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was an English statesman and literary figure. ... The Most Honourable Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830–22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... The Right Honourable Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, KG, OM, (25 July 1848 – 19 March 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858–October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867–14 December 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. ... Arthur Neville Chamberlain, PC (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940) was a Conservative British politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician and author, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... The Right Honourable Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary during World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the 1950s. ... The Right Honourable Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894–29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT,1 PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October, 1963 until October, 1964. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 - 1997. ... William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Rt. ... The Rt. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ...

Represented in the Scottish Parliament (129):

Labour (50) | SNP (27) | Conservative and Unionists (17) | Liberal Democrats (17) | Scottish Green Party (7) | Scottish Socialist Party (6) | Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (1) | Independent (5) For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... The Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (SSCUP) were formed in February 2003, in time to contest that years elections to the Scottish Parliament. ...

Represented in the Welsh Assembly (60):

Labour (29) | Plaid Cymru (12) | Conservatives (11) | Liberal Democrats (6) | Forward Wales (1) | Vacant (1) The National Assembly for Wales (or NAfW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales, and is also responsible for most UK government departments in Wales. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... Forward Wales (or Cymru Ymlaen in Welsh) is a political party operating in Wales. ...

Represented in the Northern Ireland Assembly (108)

DUP (32) | UUP (25) | Sinn Féin (24) | SDLP (18) | Alliance (6) | UKUP (1) | Independent (2) The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ...

Represented in the London Assembly (25):

Conservatives (9) | Labour (7) | Liberal Democrats (5) | Greens (E&W) (2) | One London (2) The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... One London is a British political party formed on September 1, 2005 by Damian Hockney and Peter Hulme-Cross. ...

Represented in the European Parliament (72 out of 732):

Conservatives (ED, 26) | Labour (PES, 19) | Liberal Democrats (ELDR, 12) | UKIP (ID, 10) | Greens (E&W) (EGP, 2) | SNP (EFA, 2) | DUP (EUD1, 1) | Plaid Cymru (EFA, 1) | Sinn Féin (EUL, 1) | UUP (ED), 1 | Independent (2) (Ind) The European Parliament building in Strasbourg The inside of the building The European Parliament (formerly European Parliamentary Assembly) is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) (French: Parti socialiste européen (PSE); German: Sozialdemokratische Partei Europas (SPE); Spanish: Partido socialista europeo (PSE); Italian: Partito socialista europeo (PSE)) is a European political party whose members are 30 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, active in the European Union, uniting liberal and centrist parties around Europe which together represent more than 20 million European voters and is an international non-profit association incorporated under the laws of Belgium. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... IND/DEM logo The Independence and Democracy (IND/DEM) group, formed July 20, 2004 is a euro-sceptic political group with 36 MEPs in the European Parliament. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... European Greens (or the European Green Party) is the name of the European Green Party, a political party at European level. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... EUDemocrats (EUD) is an alliance of parties, movements and political organisations operating as a transnational Party at a European level (European political party), and incorporating members from both the centre-left and the centre-right. ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... GUE-NGL logo The European United Left–Nordic Green Left is a socialist and communist political grouping within the European Parliament. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ...

Minor parties:

British National Party | Socialist Labour | Liberal | English Democrats The British National Party (BNP) is a far-right political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is an English nationalist political party in England, with representation throughout England, which seeks the establishment of a Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ...

1. DUP MEP Jim Allister is a member of the EUD, whilst the DUP itself remains non-affiliated. For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... Jim Allister, QC (born April 2, 1953) is a Northern Ireland unionist politician and barrister. ... EUDemocrats (EUD) is an alliance of parties, movements and political organisations operating as a transnational Party at a European level (European political party), and incorporating members from both the centre-left and the centre-right. ... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Conservative Party (UK) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2362 words)
The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom.
The formal name is a vestige from the 1912 merger with the Liberal Unionist Party, and an echo of the party's defence (1886-1921) of the Union of Great Britain and Ireland and subsequent insistence on British sovereignty in Northern Ireland in opposition to Irish nationalist and republican aspirations.
The name 'Conservative' was suggested by John Wilson Croker in the 1830s and later officially adopted, but the party is still often referred to as the 'Tory Party' (not least because newspaper editors find it a convenient shorthand when space is limited).
Scottish Unionist Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (392 words)
Traditionally supportive of the Conservatives, these members of the Orange community felt that the signing of the treaty was a betrayal and decided to form their own party instead.
The SUP is an ideologically conservative party which vehemently opposes the idea of Scottish independence from the rest of the United Kingdom.
The party is strongly critical of mainstream parties for what it views as a failure to safeguard the Act of Union 1707; this criticism extends even to the Conservatives, who they believe are not being 'unionist' enough.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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