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Encyclopedia > Scotch bonnet
Scotch Bonnet peppers in a Caribbean market
Scotch Bonnet peppers in a Caribbean market

Heat : Exceptionally Hot (SR: 100,000-325,000)


The Scotch Bonnet (Capsicum chinense) is a variety of Chile Pepper similar to and of the same species as the habanero. A cultivar of the habanero, it is reputed by some as one of the hottest peppers in the world. It is found mainly in the Caribbean islands and is named for its resemblance to a Scot's bonnet. Most Scotch Bonnets have a heat rating of 150,000–325,000 Scoville Units. Hot peppers in Brixton market. ... Hot peppers in Brixton market. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Chilli55. ... The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper. ... The chile pepper (also chili or chilli; from Spanish chile) is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family (Solanaceae). ... A habanero chile A habanero plant with chiles The habanero chile (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) (Spanish, from Havana) is the most intensely spicy chile pepper of the Capsicum genus. ... West Indian also redirects here. ... Scots may refer to: The Scots language People from Scotland Scottish ethnicity, histroically people of Dalriada, a Gaelic-speaking kingdom in western Scotland Scots (ethnic group) Scottish Gaelic language, sometimes Scots outside of Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... A bonnet is a kind of headgear which is usually brimless. ... The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper. ...


These peppers are used to flavour many different dishes and cuisines worldwide. Scotch Bonnet has a flavor distinct from its Habanero cousin. This gives Jerk dishes (pork/chicken) and other Caribbean dishes their unique flavor. Eaten raw, these peppers are also known to cause dizziness, numbness of hands and cheeks, and severe heartburn. A habanero chile A habanero plant with chiles The habanero chile (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) (Spanish, from Havana) is the most intensely spicy chile pepper of the Capsicum genus. ...


Fresh ripe Scotch Bonnets or Habaneros change from green to colors ranging from pumpkin orange to scarlet red. Ripe peppers are prepared for cooking by cutting out the seeds inside the fruit which can be saved for cultivation and other culinary uses.


Even those accustomed to eating hot peppers often avoid consuming the seeds.


See Also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Scotch bonnet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (212 words)
The Scotch Bonnet (Capsicum chinense) is a variety of Chile Pepper, similar to, and of the same species as, the habanero.
It is found mainly in the Caribbean islands, with a shape resembling a Scot's bonnet.
Scotch Bonnet has a flavor distinct from its Habanero cousin.
Scotch Bonnet Peppers (124 words)
Scotch bonnets are often confused with the habanero, as they are closely related, but not cultivars.
Scotch bonnets have a somewhat smoky apple-cherry and tomato flavor (if you are able to discern a flavor under all of that fiery heat).
Scotch bonnets are grown mostly in Jamaica and Belize.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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