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Encyclopedia > Science fantasy
For the magazine of the same name, see Science Fantasy (magazine).
Fantasy

Fantasy media Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Science Fantasy was a British science fiction and fantasy magazine of the 1950s and 1960s. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ...

Genre studies Fantastic art is a loosely defined art genre. ... Many anime TV series, movies, and OAVs fall into the fantasy genre. ... Fantasy Art by Boris Vallejo Fantasy Art by George Grie Fantasy Art by Michael Parkes Fantasy Art by Heinz Zander Fantasy art is a genre of art that depicts magical or other supernatural themes, ideas, creatures or settings. ... The definition of a fantasy author is somewhat diffuse, and a matter of opinion - Jules Verne considered H. G. Wells to be a fantasy author - and there is considerable overlap with science fiction authors and horror fiction authors. ... A number of fantasy comics abound on the web. ... Fantasy fiction magazines Magazines which publish fantasy fiction primarily, as opposed to other sorts of fiction, or fantasy comics or other forms of visual art (though most have published poetry, illustration and other art, and some have published at least some kinds of cartoons. ... Fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic, supernatural events, make-believe creatures, or exotic fantasy worlds. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fantasy television is a genre of television featuring elements of the fantastic, often including magic, supernatural forces, or exotic fantasy worlds. ...

Categories The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The fantasy genre has spawned many new subgenres with no clear counterparts in the myths or folklore upon which the tradition of fantasy storytelling is based, although inspiration from mythology and folklore remains a consistent theme. ... Fantastique is a French term for a literary and cinematic genre that overlaps with parts of science fiction, horror and fantasy. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Die Walküre: the magic sword, such as Nothung, is a common fantasy trope. ... This article is about the word, for other meanings see Quest (disambiguation) A quest is a journey towards a goal with great meaning and is used in mythology and literature as a plot device. ... The term, magic item can be used to refer to several historical and fictional topics: // Historical In a historical context, magic items are those artifacts which have been reputed to contain magical properties such as the Holy Grail. ... Many fantasy stories and worlds call their main sapient humanoid species races rather than species. ... A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ... A legendary creature is a mythological or folkloric creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... Lovecraftian horror is a sub-genre of horror fiction which emphasizes the psychological horror of the unknown (in some cases, unknowable) over gore or other elements of shock, which may still be present. ... otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse Magic in fiction is the endowing of fictional characters or objects with magical powers. ... Tolkienology is a term used by Tolkien fans to describe the study of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien treating Middle-earth as a real world and using academic techniques to determine if chronicler Tolkien has left enough clues to come to some fitting conclusions. ...

  • Fantasy
  • Fantasy television
  • Fantasy subgenres
  • Fantasy tropes
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Science fantasy is a mixed genre of story which contains some science fiction and some fantasy elements. Both genres, especially fantasy, are themselves poorly defined; science fantasy is therefore even more elusive of definition. A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Science fantasy vs. science fiction

A definition, offered by Rod Serling, is that "science fiction makes the implausible possible, while science fantasy makes the impossible plausible." The meaning is that science fiction describes unlikely things that could possibly take place in the real world under certain conditions, while science fantasy gives a veneer of realism to things that simply couldn't happen in the real world under any circumstances. Rodman Edward Rod Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, most famous for his science fiction anthology television series, The Twilight Zone. ...


For many users of the term, however, "science fantasy" is either a science fiction story that has drifted far enough from reality to "feel" like a fantasy, or a fantasy story that is attempting to be science fiction. While these are in theory classifiable as different approaches, and thus different genres (fantastic science fiction vs. scientific fantasy), the end products are sometimes indistinguishable.


Arthur C. Clarke's dictum that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" indicates why this is so: a writer can write a fantasy using magic of various sorts, and yet turn the story into science fiction by positing some highly advanced technology, or as-yet-unknown but ultimately thoroughly provable science, as an explanation for how the magic can occur. Another writer can describe a future world where technologies are so advanced to be invisible, and the effects produced would be classified as magical if they were only described as such. A world might include magic which only some people (or only the reader) know to be in fact technological effects. Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (born 16 December 1917) is a British science-fiction author and inventor, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ... Science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke formulated the following three laws: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. ...


There is therefore nothing intrinsic about the effects described in a given story that will tell you whether it is science fiction or fantasy. The classification of an effect as "fantastic" or "science fictional" is a matter of convention. Hyperspace, time machines and scientists are conventions of science fiction; flying carpets, magical amulets and wizards are tropes of fantasy. This is an accident of the historical development of the genre. In some cases they have overlapped: teleportation by matter-transmitter-beam is science fiction, teleportation by incantation is fantasy. A hand-held cloaking device that confers invisibility is science fiction; a hand-held Ring of Power that confers invisibility is fantasy. Mind-to-mind communication can be "psionics", or it can be an ancient elvish art. What matters is not the effect itself (generally scientifically impossible, though not always believed to be so by the authors) but the wider universe it is intended to evoke. If it is one of space travel and proton-pistols, it gets classified as "science fiction", and the appropriate terms (cloaking device, matter-transmitter) are used; if it is one of castles, sailing ships and swords, it gets classified as "fantasy", and we instead speak of magic rings and travel by enchantment. In literature, a trope is a familiar and repeated symbol, meme, theme, motif, style, character or thing that permeates a particular type of literature. ...


Drawing the line between science fiction and fantasy is not made any clearer by the fact that both of them can use invented worlds, non-human intelligent creatures (sometimes, in sf as well as fantasy, based on myth: consider C. L. Moore's Shambleau and Yvala), and amazing monsters. It is, to a large extent, authorial fiat that tells us that C.S. Lewis' Narnia books are set in a fantasy world rather than on another planet, or that Anne McCaffrey's early Pern books are extraterrestrial, and that her "dragons" are not actually dragons. Dust jacket illustration for Judgment Night by C. L. Moore, published in 1952 by Gnome Press. ... Northwest Smith is a fictional character, and the hero of a series of stories by science fiction writer C. L. Moore. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Narnia is a fantasy world created by C. S. Lewis as a location for his Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels for children. ... Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ... The Dragonriders of Pern is an extensive fantasy/science fiction series of novels and short stories primarily written by Anne McCaffrey. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ...


Even archaism, one of the strongest conventional marks of fantasy, is not an infallible distinguishing characteristic: an archaic world of edged weapons and battlemented fortresses could simply be another planet that has slid back into barbarism, or has never emerged from it. Some of Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover books represent just such a world, complete with technology-indistinguishable-from-magic. (It is this, as much as the "dragons", that leads some readers to perceive McCaffrey's Pern series as fantasy, in spite of the science-fictional setting established in the first paragraphs of the first book.) Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, often with a feminist outlook. ... The above illustration shows Darkover as the planet on the left with its four moons: Liriel, Kyrrdis, Irdriel and Mormallor. ...


Historical View

The label first came into wide use after many science fantasy stories were published in the pulp magazines, such as Robert A. Heinlein's Magic, Inc. and L. Ron Hubbard's Slaves of Sleep. Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp produced the Harold Shea series. All were relatively rationalistic stories published in John W. Campbell, Jr.'s Unknown Magazine. These were a deliberate attempt to apply the techniques and attitudes of Science Fiction to traditional fantasy and legendary subjects. The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction published, among other things, all but the last of the Operation series, by Poul Anderson. This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was an American pulp fiction writer,[2][3][4] creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897–1956) was a science fiction and fantasy writer; he was also well-known as a writer on naval history and on the American Civil War. ... Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... The Roaring Trumpet in Unknown, May 1940 The Harold Shea Stories is a name given to a series of five fantasy stories by the collaborative team of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt and to its later continuation by de Camp alone, Christopher Stasheff, Holly Lisle, John Maddox Roberts... In epistemology and in its broadest sense, rationalism is any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification (Lacey 286). ... John Wood Campbell, Jr. ... Sinister Barrier by Eric Frank Russell Unknown (also known as Unknown Worlds) was a pulp fantasy magazine, edited by John W. Campbell, that was published from 1939 to 1943. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... For the CIA intelligence project, see Operation CHAOS. Operation Chaos is a 1971 science fiction/fantasy fixup novel by Poul Anderson. ... Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926–July 31, 2001) was an American science fiction author of the genres Golden Age. ...


Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore published novels in Startling Stories, alone and together, which were far more romantic. These were closely related to the work that they and others were doing for outlets like Weird Tales, such as Moore's Northwest Smith stories cited above. Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 - February 4, 1958) was a science fiction author born in Los Angeles, California. ... Dust jacket illustration for Judgment Night by C. L. Moore, published in 1952 by Gnome Press. ... Against the Fall of Night by Arthur C. Clarke in Startling Stories Cover by Earle Bergey Startling Stories was a pulp science fiction magazine which also published a lot of science fantasy. ... Romantics redirects here. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ... Northwest Smith is a fictional character, and the hero of a series of stories by science fiction writer C. L. Moore. ...


Early science fiction book publisher Gnome Press published Robert E. Howard's Conan the Conqueror in hardback in 1950 with the book clearly labeled 'science fantasy' on the dustjacket. Gnome Press was a US small-press publishing company primarily known for being the first to publish Isaac Asimovs Foundation Trilogy, and for bringing Robert E. Howards Conan the Barbarian stories back from pulp obscurity. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936)[1] was a classic American pulp writer of fantasy, horror, historical adventure, boxing, western, and detective fiction. ...


Ace Books published a number of books as Science Fantasy during the 1950's and '60s. Many of them, such as Leigh Brackett's Mars stories, are still regarded as such. Conan the Conqueror was published as an Ace Double with Brackett's Sword of Rhiannon. Others, such as Andre Norton's Witch World books, are now considered outright fantasy. Mercedes Lackey has discussed this period in her recent introduction to an omnibus edition of the first three Witch World books. In the U.S. at that time, these were almost the only stories which used that label. Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915 - March 18, 1978), was a writer of fantasy and science fiction, mystery novels and - best known to the general public - Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... Ace Doubles See also Ace Books. ... Andre Alice Norton (February 17, 1912 – March 17, 2005), science fiction and fantasy author (with some works of historical fiction and contemporary fiction), was born Alice Mary Norton in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. ... The Witch World series by Andre Norton is a long series of fantasies laid in a parallel universe where magic works, and at the beginning at least, is the exclusive property of women. ... Mercedes Lackey (born June 24, 1950) (also known as Misty Lackey) is a prolific American author of fantasy novels. ...


Subgenres of science fantasy

Dying Earth

Main article: Dying Earth subgenre

Jack Vance's Dying Earth stories are sometimes classed as science fantasy because the cosmology used is not compatible with that conventionally accepted by science fiction. Other stories in the Dying Earth subgenre such as M. John Harrison's Viriconium novels or Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun are usually classed as science fantasy. The Dying Earth subgenre is a sub-category of science fantasy which takes place at the end of Time, when the Sun slowly fades and the laws of the Universe themselves fail, with the science becoming indistinguishable from magic. ... John Holbrook Vance (born August 28, 1916 in San Francisco, California) is generally described as an American fantasy and science fiction author, though Vance himself has reportedly objected to such labels. ... Dying Earth is a series of fantasy books by Jack Vance. ... The Dying Earth subgenre is a sub-category of science fantasy which takes place at the end of Time, when the Sun slowly fades and the laws of the Universe themselves fail, with the science becoming indistinguishable from magic. ... Michael John Harrison (July 26, 1945, Warwickshire ), is a UK science fiction author, fantasy author and literary fiction author, who writes as M. John Harrison. // Biography and writing career Harrisons first story was published in 1966. ... Viriconium is a fictional city created by M. John Harrison and also the name of the cycle of novels and stories set in and around it. ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931, New York, New York) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... The Book of the New Sun is a novel in four parts written by science fiction and fantasy author Gene Wolfe. ...


Planetary romance

Main article: Planetary romance

The planetary romance, a story set primarily or wholly on a single planet and illustrating its scenery, native peoples (if any) and cultures, offers considerable scope for science fantasy, in the sense of fantasy rationalized by reference to science-fictional conventions. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sword and Planet. ...


David Lindsay's A Voyage to Arcturus, published in 1920 is one of the earliest examples of the type, although it differs from most of them in not assuming a science-fictional background of interplanetary or interstellar travel; it is rather a philosophical romance, which uses an alien planet as a background for exploring philosophical themes. C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet (1938) is an example of the same type of story, though in its case the preoccupations are theological. In both cases the magical elements are barely rationalized, and in Lewis' case stand in stark contrast to the pseudo-scientific machinery that frames the story. David Lindsay (1876-1945) was a British author now most famous for the philosophical novel A Voyage to Arcturus (1920). ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Out of the Silent Planet is the first novel of a science fiction trilogy written by C. S. Lewis, sometimes referred to as the Space Trilogy or Ransom Trilogy. ...


C. L. Moore's Northwest Smith stories fall squarely into the fantasy/horror camp, but utilize a space opera-like frame and various pseudo-scientific rationalization: god or monster as powerful alien for instance. Dust jacket illustration for Judgment Night by C. L. Moore, published in 1952 by Gnome Press. ... Northwest Smith is a fictional character, and the hero of a series of stories by science fiction writer C. L. Moore. ... Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliché elements. ...


Some of Leigh Brackett's stories set on Mars and Venus might be regarded as science fantasy, especially those which occur in distant and barbarous parts of the planets, such as People of the Talisman and The Moon that Vanished. Other stories set on the same worlds contain far more science fictional tropes. All of Brackett's stories imply that a rational, scientific explanation for such things as mind-transmission and the ability to create visible illusions is available somewhere, but the explanations are generally assumed rather than attempted. Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915 - March 18, 1978), was a writer of fantasy and science fiction, mystery novels and - best known to the general public - Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ...


Frank Herbert's Dune novels are also classed by some as science fantasy, probably because his Arrakis dispenses with many (but not all) of the technological ornaments that conventionally mark a story as "science fiction"; however, his scientifically impossible concepts (like prescience and genetic memory) were staples in mainstream science fiction for many years. Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... The fictional Dune universe, or Duniverse, is the political, scientific, and social setting of author Frank Herberts six-book Dune series of science fiction novels. ... Arrakis, (الراقص ar-rāqiṣ, the dancer) later Rakis (informally known as Dune) is a fictional desert planet featured in the Dune series of novels by Frank Herbert; it is the home of the Fremen (Zensunni wanderers) and later, the Imperial Capital under the Atreides Empire. ...


Anne McCaffrey's Pern novels and Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover novels are more obvious examples of science fantasy, the former largely because of its choice of the fantasy icon of the "dragon" at the center of the stories, the latter because a form of rationalized magic is a dominant theme. Both share the concept of long-ago lost Earth expeditions that had peopled their respective planets, and over time had regressed to a quasi-medieval state of life. Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ... The Dragonriders of Pern is an extensive fantasy/science fiction series of novels and short stories primarily written by Anne McCaffrey. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, often with a feminist outlook. ... The above illustration shows Darkover as the planet on the left with its four moons: Liriel, Kyrrdis, Irdriel and Mormallor. ...


Some examples of this type of science fantasy deliberately blur the already vague distinction between science fictional paranormal powers and magic; for instance, Poul Anderson's The Queen of Air and Darkness, in which aliens use psionic powers of illusion to imitate earthly myths of fairies -- who are themselves traditionally regarded as magical illusionists. Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926–July 31, 2001) was an American science fiction author of the genres Golden Age. ...


SF Otherworlds

Some science fantasies use fantasy worlds with the thinnest veneer of science fictional trappings, only distinguishable with difficulty from standard fantasy. An early example of this type is Eric Rücker Eddison's The Worm Ouroboros, nominally set on the planet Mercury, but a Mercury that is indistinguishable in any way from a fantasy Earth. This work may be considered a borderline case. Original Cover Eric Rücker Eddison (November 24, 1882 - August 18, 1945) was an English civil servant and author, writing under the name E.R. Eddison. ... The Worm Ouroboros (1922) is a heroic high fantasy novel by Eric Rucker Eddison. ...


In Andre Norton's Witch World series, the fantasy world is excused as a parallel universe. There are a few science fictional elements in the earlier stories of this series, which are absent from the later novels. Andre Alice Norton (February 17, 1912 – March 17, 2005), science fiction and fantasy author (with some works of historical fiction and contemporary fiction), was born Alice Mary Norton in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. ... The Witch World series by Andre Norton is a long series of fantasies laid in a parallel universe where magic works, and at the beginning at least, is the exclusive property of women. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ...


Terry Brooks' Shannara books represent the fantasy world as the far future of a lost technological civilization (thus sharing some features with the Dying Earth subgenre). Terence Dean Terry Brooks (born January 8, 1944) is a writer of fantasy fiction. ... This article is about the fantasy series. ... The Dying Earth subgenre is a sub-category of science fantasy which takes place at the end of Time, when the Sun slowly fades and the laws of the Universe themselves fail, with the science becoming indistinguishable from magic. ...


Space opera

Main article: Space opera

Space opera is not normally thought of as science fantasy, but some examples of space opera invoke vaguely explained, or completely unexplained paranormal powers, common in science fiction, which some think approximate magic closely enough to make the story fantastic. These include George Lucas' Star Wars franchise. Magic plays a major role in the Outlaw Star anime series. Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliché elements. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Star Wars is an epic space opera saga and a fictional universe initially developed by George Lucas during the 1970s and expanded since that time. ... Serialized in Ultra Jump Original run 1997 – No. ...


E. E. Smith's Lensman series, which some might call science fantasy, historically was never considered other than science fiction, since (unlike Lucas) Smith gave its paranormal mental powers a carefully rationalized scientific veneer and, in addition, they were completely in accord with accepted conventions of science fiction. Gray Lensman in Astounding Oct. ... The Lensman series is a serial science fiction space opera by E. E. Smith. ...


Sword and planet

Main article: Sword and planet

Many works by Edgar Rice Burroughs fall into this category, as well as those of his imitators such as Otis Adelbert Kline, Kenneth Bulmer, Lin Carter, and John Norman. They are largely classed as "science fantasy" because of the presence of swords and, usually, an archaic aristocratic social system; Burroughs' own novels are, however, skeptical in spirit and almost free of any non-rationalized "fantastic" element. Sword and Planet is a subgenre of speculative fiction that features rousing adventure stories set on other planets, and usually featuring Earthmen as protagonists. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... Planet of Peril by Otis Adelbert Kline, Ace Books, 1963 Otis Adelbert Kline (1891-1946) was an adventure novelist and literary agent during the pulp era. ... Henry Kenneth Bulmer, (January 14, 1921 – December 16, 2005), born in London, England, was a British author, primarily of science fiction. ... Linwood Vrooman Carter (June 9, 1930 - February 7, 1988) was an American author of science fiction and fantasy, as well as an editor and critic. ... John Norman, pen name of John Frederick Lange, Jr. ...


Magic Science

A "magic science" story is a story where magic has replaced or become synonymous with technology. An excellent example would be the magitechnology of the Tales of Symphonia game, as well as the Eberron Campaign Setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game or the Warhammer 40,000 campaign setting (although 40K doesn't use "magic", much of humanity can only rationalize the physics-defying Immaterium as magic). These stories usually combine archaic elements such as swords and other low-tech weaponry with high-tech elements such as flying vehicles or power generators. The most popular Square Enix games can also be considered in the genre of magic science, as there are many advances in technology (i.e. hi-tech airships, advanced armour and weapon technology, enormous technological cities) as well as the use of magic. Yet another Magic Science series is Incarnations of Immortality by Piers Anthony. The Incarnations of Immortality takes place in a reality where magic and science co-exist. In addition, many classical personalities (such as Death, Fate, Time and others) are anthropomorphised and function as major characters. Tales of Symphonia ) is a video game first released for the Nintendo GameCube and later for the PlayStation 2. ... The Eberron logo Eberron is a campaign setting created by author and game designer Keith Baker for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. ... “D&D” redirects here. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... This article is about the tabletop miniature wargame and the fictional universe in which it is set. ... The Immaterium (also referred to as the Empyrean, Aether or Warp) is an alternate dimension in the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe. ... Akron in flight, 2 November 1931 An airship is a buoyant (lighter_than_air) aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... Incarnations of Immortality is the name of a seven-book fantasy series by Piers Anthony. ... Piers Anthony Dillingham Jacob (born August 6, 1934 in Oxford, England) is a writer in the science fiction and fantasy genres, publishing under the name Piers Anthony. ...


Other subgenres

Science fantasy is sometimes used to refer to a fantasy story in which the fantastic elements are presented as compatible with real-world science, in contrast to fantasies in which the fantastic only needs to have its own internal logic. Classic examples are Poul Anderson's Three Hearts and Three Lions, in which petrification means danger because turning carbon to silicon results in a radioactive isotope, and his Operation Chaos, where werewolves and other lycanthrope are the same size in human and animal form, owing to conservation of mass. Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926–July 31, 2001) was an American science fiction author of the genres Golden Age. ... The original alignment system of Dungeons and Dragons (which grouped all players and creatures into Law and Chaos) was derived from the Three Hearts and Three Lions novel by Poul Anderson, where a troll is also described from whence derived the D&D description of the monster. ... For the CIA intelligence project, see Operation CHAOS. Operation Chaos is a 1971 science fiction/fantasy fixup novel by Poul Anderson. ...


An example of science fantasy in television is the cartoon Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light, which combined alien fiction, sword and sorcery, magic, technology and the superhero genre - all of them rolled into one coherent vision. Another example is the worlds depicted in the Masters of the Universe franchise. Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light is a half hour animated television series from 1987. ... Clash of the titans: He-Man and Skeletor face off on the cover of a vintage MOTU graphic novel. ...


Science Fantasy is also a popular subject for role-playing games, of both pen-and-paper and computer varieties. Examples include Rifts, Fading Suns, a number of Square Enix/Square Co. games, Shadowrun and Dragonstar role-playing games, the Phantasy Star series, and the Warhammer 40,000 wargame. This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rifts is a multi-genre role-playing game created by Kevin Siembieda in 1990 and published continuously by Palladium Books since then. ... Fading Suns is a science fiction space opera role-playing game published by Holistic Design. ... Shadowrun is a cyberpunk-urban fantasy cross-genre role-playing game, set 63 years in the future,[1]following a great cataclysm that has brought use of magic back to the world, just as it begins to embrace the marvels (and dangers) of technologies such as cyberspace, omnipresent computer networks... Dragonstar is a futuristic magic-meets-machine campaign setting created by Fantasy Flight Games for Wizards of the Coasts D20 role-playing game system. ... Phantasy Star game. ... This article is about the tabletop miniature wargame and the fictional universe in which it is set. ...


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
What is Science Fantasy? (558 words)
Science fantasy developed out of a need to push science fiction beyond what might seem possible when written within the strict confines of older, classic, science fiction.
My intention was to stretch science fiction to the edge of known science and then beyond those boundaries to the degree that I risk accusations of mixing fantasy with hard science.
It is an adventurous science fantasy describing interstellar and planetary conflict as well as a resulting peace from a single heart’s desire.
Science fantasy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1921 words)
Frank Herbert's Dune novels are also classed by some as science fantasy, probably because his Arrakis dispenses with many (but not all) of the technological ornaments that conventionally mark a story as "science fiction"; however, his scientifically impossible concepts (like prescience and genetic memory) were staples in mainstream science fiction for many years.
Anne McCaffrey's Pern novels and Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover novels are more obviously science fantasy, the former largely because of its choice of the fantasy icon of the dragon at the center of the stories, the latter because a form of rationalized magic is a dominant theme.
Science fantasy is sometimes used to refer to a fantasy story in which the fantastic elements are presented as compatible with real-world science, in contrast to fantasies in which the fantastic only needs to have its own internal logic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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