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Encyclopedia > School of the Art Institute of Chicago

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Established 1866
Type Private
President President Tony Jones
Undergraduates 2,099
Location Chicago, IL, USA
Campus Urban
Colors Teal, Gold
Mascot Artie the Lion
Affiliations Art Institute of Chicago
Website www.saic.edu

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago is a fine arts college located in Chicago, Illinois. It is a professional college of the visual and related arts, accredited since 1936 by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and since 1944 (charter member) by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. It is currently seeking accreditation from the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Its downtown Chicago campus consists of five buildings located in the immediate vicinity of the Art Institute of Chicago's building. SAIC is in an equal partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago and share many administrative resources such as design, construction, and human resources. The president of the school is Tony Jones and the dean of students is Carol Becker. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Art Institute of Chicago is a fine art museum located in Chicago, Illinois. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) is one of six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... National Association of Schools of Art and Design, known as NASAD for short, is an organisation of colleges, schools and universities. ... The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) is the sole authority for accredited US professional degree programs for architecture in the United States, developing standards and procedures to verify that each accredited program meets standards for the appropriate education of architects. ... The Art Institute of Chicago is a fine art museum located in Chicago, Illinois. ... View from Adams Street The Art Institute of Chicago Building houses the Art Institute of Chicago, and is located in the Chicago Landmark Historic Michigan Boulevard District in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois. ...


SAIC is in no manner related to The Art Institutes chain of schools. The Art Institutes (often abbreviated as Ai) is a collection of private, for-profit educational institutions for career preparation in the visual, creative, and applied arts, including design, media, fashion, and culinary programs. ...

Contents

History

In 1866, a group of 35 artists founded the Chicago Academy of Design in a studio on Dearborn Street, with the intent to run a free school with its own art gallery. The organization was modeled after European art academies, such as the Royal Academy, with Academians and Associate Academians. The Academy's charter was granted in March 1867. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Classes started in 1868, meeting every day at a cost of $10 per month. The Academy's success enabled it to build a new home for the school, a five story stone building on 66 West Adams Street, which opened on November 22, 1870. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


However, the Great Chicago Fire the following year destroyed the building, along with a great deal of the rest of Chicago, and threw the Academy into debt. Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Attempts to continue in spite of the loss, using rented facilities, failed. By 1878, the Academy was $10,000 in debt. Members tried to rescue the ailing institution by making deals with local businessmen, before finally abandoning it in 1879 to found a new organization, named the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. When the Chicago Academy of Design went bankrupt the same year, the new Chicago Academy of Fine Arts bought its assets at auction. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Chicago Academy of Fine Arts is one former name of the Art Institute of Chicago. ... The Chicago Academy of Fine Arts is one former name of the Art Institute of Chicago. ...


In 1882, the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts changed its name to the current Art Institute of Chicago. The same year, they purchased a lot on the corner of Michigan Avenue and Van Buren Avenue for $45,000. The property's building was leased, and a new building was constructed behind it, to house the school's facilities. Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Michigan Avenue refers to remnants of Old U.S. Highway 12 that ran from downtown Detroit to Chicago. ...


With the announcement of the World's Columbian Exposition to be held in 189293, the Art Institute pressed for a building on the lakefront to be constructed for the fair, but to be used by the Institute afterwards. The city agreed, and the building was completed in time for the second year of the fair. The construction costs were paid by selling the Michigan/Van Buren property. On October 31, 1893, the Institute was allowed to move into their new building. From the 1900's to the 1960's the school offered with the Logan Family (members of the board) the Logan Medal of the arts, that became one of the most distingish award to be given to artists in the US. One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Price started by the Patron of the Arts Frank Granger Logan, founder of the brokerage house of Logan & Bryan, he served for over 50 years on the board of the Chicago Art Institute, and became its honorary president, the Art Institute honored him with a gift of 20 paintings...


In 2006, the Art Institute began construction of "The Modern Wing", an addition situated on the southwest corner of Columbus and Monroe. Completion of the project, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Renzo Piano, is scheduled for 2009. The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually by the Hyatt Foundation to honor a living architect. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ...


Between 1959 and 1970, the Institute was a key site in the battle to gain art & documentary photography a place in galleries, under curator Hugh Edwards and his assistants. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh Edwards (1903 - 1986). ...


Ranking

According to U.S. News & World Report, as of 2007, tied with RISD and Yale for first place as America's best overall graduate program for fine arts. SAIC took 1st place for photography, 2nd place for painting, 3rd place for visual communications, and 3rd place for sculpture.[1] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced /RIZ-dee/) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ...


Notable Alumni

The Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey (1963)
Interrogation II, by Leon Golub 1981.

Cover to the Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey. ... Cover to the Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Golub1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Golub1. ... Leon Golub (January 23, 1922 - August 8, 2004) was an American painter. ... Enrique Alferez (1901 - 1999) was Mexican born Louisiana artist, best known as a sculptor in the art deco style. ... Thomas Hart Benton, painter Thomas Hart Benton, or Tom Benton (April 15, 1889 - January 19, 1975) was an American muralist of the Regionalist school. ... Roger Brown (1941-1997) was an American artist who was an important member of the Chicago Imagists, a group in the 1960s and 1970s who turned to representational art. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Natalie Bookchin (born 1962) is an artist based in Los Angeles, California. ... John Angus Chamberlain (born April 16, 1927) is an American sculptor. ... John Churchill Chase (dates?) was a cartoonist and writer. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The Walt Disney Company (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Dunn at the Laws of Attraction priemere. ... Leah Meyerhoff (born December 4, 1979 in San Francisco, California) is a Student Academy Award nominated filmmaker. ... Figural sculpture representing Introspection at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco The March of Religion on the Rockefeller Chapel, figure of Christ in the center Ulric Henry Ellerhusen (1879 - 1957) first name variously cited as Ulrich or Ulrik, surname sometimes cited as Ellerhousen) was a German-American sculptor... Leon Golub (January 23, 1922 - August 8, 2004) was an American painter. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Arthur Green (born 1941) is a well respected professor and painter. ... The Chicago Imagists were a group of representational artists associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center in the late 1960s. ... Roy Halston Frowick, also known as Halston (April 23, 1932–March 26, 1990) was an iconic clothing designer of the 1970s. ... Stieg Hedlund (born 1965 in Portland, Oregon) is a computer and video game designer, artist, writer, game producer and level designer. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up diablo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Diablo II, sequel to the popular game Diablo, is a dark fantasy-themed action role-playing game in a hack and slash or Dungeon Roaming style. ... “Starcraft” redirects here. ... Hugh Marston Hefner (born April 9, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois), also referred to colloquially as Hef, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Playboy is an American mens magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... Herbert Lawrence Block, commonly known as Herblock (October 13, 1909 – October 7, 2001), was a U.S. editorial cartoonist. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Jeff Koons (born January 21, 1955), is an American artist. ... Dan Kwong is a veteran performance artist, writer, teacher and visual artist. ... Robert Lostutter (born 1939) is a Chicago-based artist. ... The Chicago Imagists were a group of representational artists associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center in the late 1960s. ... Raúl Martínez (1927-1995) was a Cuban painter, designer and graphic artist. ... Pop art is an artistic movement that is a rejection of abstract expressionism and aims to return to figurative art while incorporating themes and techniques from mass culture. ... Master Santiago Martinez Delgado. ... William Henry Bill Mauldin (October 29, 1921 – January 22, 2003) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the United States. ... Joan Mitchell (1925-1992) was a ‘Second Generation’ Abstract Expressionist painter. ... Elizabeth Murray (born 1940) is an American artist. ... Georgia Totto OKeeffe (November 15, 1887—March 6, 1986) was an American artist. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Soft Bathtub (Model)—Ghost Version by Claes Oldenburg 1966, acryllic and pencil on foam-filled canvas with wood, cord, and plaster. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ed Paschke (1939 - 2004) was an American painter. ... Cynthia Rowley runway presentation at NY Fashion Week (Spring 2007) Cynthia Rowley is an American fashion designer. ... Sedaris in 2005. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Victor Skrebneski (born in 1929 in Chicago, Illinois) is a famous photographer born to parents of Polish and Russian heritage. ... Mark George Tobey (December 11, 1890 – April 24, 1976) was an American Abstract Expressionism Painter, born in Centerville, Wisconsin. ... Sarah Jane Vowell (born December 27, 1969) is an American author, journalist, humorist, and commentator. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... American Gothic (1930) Stained glass window in Cedar Rapids, Iowa 2004 Iowa state quarter Grant Wood, born Grant DeVolson Wood (February 13, 1891 – February 12, 1942) was an American painter, born in Anamosa, Iowa. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wen Yiduo (real name: Wen Jiahua) (1899-1946) was a Chinese poet and scholar. ... Fischerspooner is an electroclash duo and performance troupe formed in 1998 in New York. ... Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930) is an author, cartoonist, and illustrator in the United States. ... Karl Wirsum (born 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) is an influential American artist. ... The Chicago Imagists were a group of representational artists associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center in the late 1960s. ... Chris Ward may refer to: Chris Ward, an American rapper and television performer, better known as mc chris Chris Ward, a writer for Wizard Magazine and comic books Chris Ward, a former Canadian cabinet minister Chris Ward, an English grandmaster at the game of chess Chris Ward, an English/Canadian... Chris Ward (born September 2, 1975), otherwise known as mc chris, is a nerdcore rapper, voice actor, and improvisational comedian born in Illinois, USA. He currently self releases on his own label Jet Pack Industries, LLC. His trademarks include the synthesis of his geek heritage with the gangster image associated... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

Notable Faculty

  • George Bellows (Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
  • Stan Brakhage
  • Wafaa Bilal
  • Barbara Rossi, painter, original member of the Chicago Imagists
  • Ruth VanSickle Ford (Chicago Academy of Fine Arts)

George Bellows George Wesley Bellows (August 19, 1882 - January 8, 1925) was an American painter, known for his bold depictions of urban life in New York City. ... Stan Brakhage (1933-2003) Stan Brakhage (January 14, 1933 – March 9, 2003) was an American non-narrative filmmaker. ... Wafaa Bilal (Arabic: ) (born June 10, 1966) is an Iraqi American artist and professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. ... Barbara Rossi (born 1940) is a Chicago artist, one of the original Chicago Imagists, a group in the 1960s and 1970s who turned to representational art. ... The Chicago Imagists were a group of representational artists associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center in the late 1960s. ... Ruth VanSickle Ford (August 8, 1897 – April 18, 1989) was an American painter, art teacher, and owner of the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. ...

Controversy

The Harold Washington Incident

"Mirth & Girth" by David Nelson, 1988
"Mirth & Girth" by David Nelson, 1988

In 1988, a student painting of Harold Washington who was the first black mayor of Chicago was torn down by the city's aldermen based on its content. The painting, "Mirth & Girth" by David Nelson, was of Washington clad only in women's underwear holding a pencil. Washington had died recently and was rumored to be gay. Image File history File links MirthGirth. ... Image File history File links MirthGirth. ... Harold Lee Washington (April 15, 1922 – November 25, 1987) was a lawyer, legislator and the first African American Mayor of Chicago, Illinois serving from 1983 until his death in 1987. ... An alderman is a member of a municipal legislative body in a town or city with many jurisdictions. ...


The city council discussed this matter to great length claiming that the author was mentally unstable and the work as a disgrace to the city. The aldermen then met with the school's director and with police had the painting "arrested" for its inflammatory content.


The painting was returned damaged subsequently after a lengthy lawsuit involving the ACLU, but Nelson received payment for that. The ACLU claimed the removal violated Nelson's First, Fourth, and Fourteenth amendment rights. [2] The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.[1] It works through litigation, legislation, and community...


The "Dread Scott" Incident

In 1989, a student named Dread Scott had draped the American flag across the floor for a piece titled "What Is The Proper Way To Display A U.S. Flag?" which resulted in a media frenzy. The piece was a podium with a notebook for viewers to express how they felt the flag should be displayed, but the podium was set on a flag laid on the floor. In order for viewers to write in the notebook, they would have to walk on the flag. Viewers were occasionally arrested at the request of veterans. [3]


The school stood by the student's display in the face of protests and threats. That year, the school's federal funding was cut from $70,000 to $1 and many benefactors pulled donations. Later on, the school would refuse to allow him to display the piece at his BFA thesis exhibition.


The piece has been displayed throughout numerous galleries in the country after this incident including the show "Our Aim Is To Destroy Them!" by the Near NorthWest Arts Council Gallery in 1988.


Dread Scott is often associated with David Nelson due to time between the works, but Scott distances himself from Nelson and has been quoted saying, "[Nelson] doesn't mind promoting racism, doesn't mind promoting homophobia, doesn't mind promoting, you know, the oppression of women. I want to liberate people from all of that."[4]


Academics

SAIC offers a broad range of fine arts degrees and is interdisciplinary; a selected course of concentration is not necessary.


Departments of Study

Painting Critique, students critiquing work
The Etching Room, etching presses and workstations

Architecture, interior architecture and designed objects
Art education
Art therapy
Art history, theory, and criticism
Art and technology studies
Ceramics
Design for emerging technologies Image File history File linksMetadata SAIC_PaintCritique. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SAIC_PaintCritique. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SAIC_EtchLab. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SAIC_EtchLab. ...

  • Interactive Design
  • Computer Programming
  • Web Design

Fashion design
Fiber and material studies

  • Weaving
  • Print for materials
  • Dye

Film, video and new media
First year program (foundation dept. for undergraduates)

  • 2D - any media limited to two dimensions.
  • 3D - any media limited to three dimensions.
  • 4D - any media that incorporates time.
  • Research Studio

Liberal arts

  • English
  • Humanities
  • Languages
  • Liberal Arts
  • Sciences
  • Social Sciences

Painting and drawing
Performance
Photography
Printmedia

  • Silkscreen
  • Offset printing
  • Etching
  • Lithography
  • Digital output
  • Book binding

Sculpture

  • Metal work
  • Foundry
  • Wood

Sound
Visual communication

  • Graphic Design
  • Information Design
  • Typographic Design
  • Package Design

Visual and critical studies
Writing


Undergraduate Degree Programs

B.A. in Visual and Critical Studies
B.F.A. in Studio Arts
B.F.A. with an emphasis in Writing
B.F.A. with an emphasis in art History, Theory, and Criticism
B.F.A. with an emphasis in Art Education
B.I.A. Bachelor of Interior Architecture


Graduate Degree Programs

M.F.A. in Studio Arts
M.F.A. in Writing
M.A. in Modern Art History, Theory, and Criticism.
M.A. in Art Education
M.A. in Teaching
M.A. in Art Therapy
M.A. in Arts Administration and Policy
M.A. in Visual and Critical Studies
M.S. in Historic Preservation
Master of Architecture
Master of Architecture with an emphasis in Interior Architecture
Master of Design in Designed Objects.


Other Degrees

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Studio Arts
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Writing
Graduate Certificate in Art History, Theory, and Criticism


Grading System

SAIC does not utilize a standard grading system. All academics are marked as pass or fail.[1] It is a practice intended by the school to encourage exploration and growth without worry for failure at the bias of a professor. Most students are drawn to this unconventional structure since art as a purely subjective study cannot always be graded like traditional academics. This grading system is dependent upon a student's personal ambition and requires more effort from the student as there are no marks for the student to use as academic measures or comparisons to peers.


Campus Life

The main campus is set in downtown Chicago, also known as the loop. The school uses three main buildings which are the Michigan (112 S. Michigan), the Sharp (37 S. Wabash), and the Columbus (280 S. Columbus). The school also has additional buildings throughout Chicago that are used student galleries or investments. The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ...


Galleries

  • Betty Rymer Gallery - The Betty Rymer gallery is named in honor of Betty Rymer, the late wife of School Board of Governors member Barry Rymer. In 1989, Mr. Rymer made a major contribution to the School's Advancement Program and the gallery is a dedication to her memory and interests. It is located in the 280 S. Columbus building. It is run similarly to Gallery 2, but the process for exhibition is less intense with more student workers involved. Since it is on campus, it also receives more student traffic.
  • Gallery 2 - Gallery 2 is an offsite space offered through their 847 W. Jackson building. It is run by the school's non-teaching faculty and paid student workers. The gallery also hosts annually the Undergraduate and Graduate Thesis exhibitions also known respectively as the BFA and MFA shows. During the rest of the year, it is the most advanced undergraduate and graduate student program for showing work as the process for exhibition mimics professional galleries.
  • Student Union Galleries (LG Space, Gallery X) - The Student Union Galleries (SUGs) is the school's fully student-run gallery system. Paid student directors maintain the galleries with assistance from a faculty adviser. A volunteer student committee assists in maintenance and the selection of exhibitions. They have two locations: LG Spaceof the 37 S. Wabash building; and Gallery X of the 280 S. Columbus building. The two locations allow the galleries to cycle two shows simultaneously, with three shows per semester. They also maintain their own website.[2]

Student Organizations

ExTV

ExTV is a student-run volunteer television station. Its broadcasts are available via monitors located throughout the 112 S. Michigan building, the 37 S Wabash building and in cable-ready areas of the 162 N. State and 7 W. Madison residence halls. As a closed-circuit station, it is not available off-campus.


F Newsmagazine

FNews is a student-run newspaper with both paid and volunteer positions. They are a monthly publication with running 12,000 copies. Copies are distributed throughout the city mainly at locations that students frequent such as popular diners or movie theaters.


Free Radio SAIC

Free Radio SAIC is a student-run volunteer internet radio station.[3]


Student Government

The student government of SAIC is unique in that its constitution resembles a socialist republic, in which four officers hold equal power and responsibility. Elections are held every year. There are no campaign requirements. Any group of four students may run for office, but there must always be four students.


The student government is responsible for hosting a school-wide student meeting once a month. At these meetings students discuss school concerns of any nature. The predominant topic is funding for the various student organizations. Organizations which desire funding must present a proposal at the meeting by which the students vote whether they should receive monies or not. The student government cannot participate in the vote: only oversee it.


The student government is also responsible for the distribution of the Peanut Butter & Jelly Fund, Welcome Back to School Party, Monthly Morning Coffees, Open Forums, Barbecues in the Pit (the outdoor area at the entrance of the 280 S Columbus Building), Holiday Art Sale, and a Materials Event. In the past Student Government has accomplished such things as campus-wide recycling, and access to the Chicago Transit Authority's U-Pass. Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ... Universal Transit Pass (U-Pass) programs give students enrolled in participating post-secondary institutions unlimited access to local transit. ...


Student groups

  • Agape - Christian student group
  • AIGA Student Group - A chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.
  • AIAS Student Group - A chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students.
  • Art History Visiting Lecturer Committee - a group that brings in 3rd party art history lecturers.
  • At Home World Wide Fashion Society - a group concentrating on global fashion trends.
  • Base Space Committee - This committee manages the Base Space Gallery, Sculpture Courtyard, and Display Case in the Sculpture Department of the Columbus Building.
  • Belly Dancing Group
  • Body Revolution - an exercise group with a focus on non-traditional practices
  • Escape Chicago - group focusing on excursions outside of Chicago
  • Eye & Ear Clinic - free, bi-weekly screening series run by (FVNM) Film Video News Media students.
  • Grounded - an environmental group
  • Hillel - a chapter of the Foundation for Jewish Campus Life
  • Incarnation - Christian student group
  • Jamboree Wednesday - improvised music group
  • Korean Graduate Student Community
  • Korean Students Association (KSA)
  • NAEA Student Group - a chapter of the National Art Education Association
  • Performance Art Society
  • Photographic Graduate Committee on Visiting Artists - a group that brings in 3rd party photographers.
  • Platypus - a reading group with a concentration in current events
  • SAIC/AVU Collaborative: Heart Club - group helps to facilitate funding and curriculum about study trips and new exchange students
  • Shifted Wires - a student group introducing new information and technologies
  • SMART Art/Gallery- residence hall group designed to provide residence hall students with art opportunities
  • SMART Community - resident hall group used to connect students with each other and with the greater Chicago community
  • SOAP - a philosophy discussion group
  • Students Against War and Injustice - originally No! Iraq, it is a student activist group with a focus on war issues
  • Students For Sexual Diversity - group promoting sexual diversity and tolerance
  • Students With Abundant Materials (SWAM) - a group concerned with sustainability and recycling materials
  • Taiwanese Student Association
  • The 13th Floor - an open student group focusing on visual communications
  • Veggies Unite! - vegetarian organization

The American Institute of Graphic Arts (often known simply under the acronym AIGA) is the American professional organization for design. ... AIAS Logo The American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) is an international organization for college-level students of architecture. ... The National Art Education Association (NAEA), established in 1947, is a professional organization for visual art educators which provides professional development and advocacy for art education. ...

Property

This is a list of property in order of acquisition:

  • 280 South Columbus (Classrooms, Departmental Offices, Studios, Betty Rymer Gallery)
  • 37 South Wabash (Classrooms, Main Administrative Offices, Flaxman Library)
  • 112 South Michigan (Classrooms, Departmental Offices, Studios, Special Events Ballroom)
  • 7 West Madison (Student Residences)
  • 162 North State (Student Residences)
  • 164 North State Street (Gene Siskel Film Center)

The School also owns these properties outside of the immediate vicinity of the Chicago Loop: Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ...

  • 1926 North Halsted (Gallery Space) in Chicago. A property donated by artist Roger J. Brown.
  • The Oxbow Property (Retreat Facility) in Oxbow, Michigan

The School leases:

  • 36 South Wabash Leasing the 12th floor. (Administrative Offices, Architecture and Interior Architecture Design Center)
  • 847 West Jackson Leasing the 2nd and 3rd floors. (Gallery Space)

External links

References

  1. ^ America's Best Graduate Programs 2007. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  2. ^ Dubin, Steven (1992). Arresting Images, Impolitic Art and Uncivil Actions. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-90893-0. 
  3. ^ Dubin, Steven (1992). Arresting Images, Impolitic Art and Uncivil Actions. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-90893-0. 
  4. ^ Dubin, Steven (1992). Arresting Images, Impolitic Art and Uncivil Actions. Routledge, 104. ISBN 0-415-90893-0. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Illinois Institute of Art The - Search Results - MSN Encarta (201 words)
Illinois Institute of Art, The, private, coeducational institution in Chicago, Illinois, with a branch campus in the suburb of Schaumburg.
Art Schools : Illinois: Art Institute of Chicago, School of the
Art Institute of Chicago, School of the, private, coeducational institution in Chicago, Illinois.
Schools: Art Institute (www.ifvchicago.com) (907 words)
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago's primary purpose is to foster the conceptual and technical education of the artist in a highly professional and studio-oriented environment.
The teaching of studio art, the complementary programs in art history, theory, and criticism and liberal arts, the visiting artists, and the collections and exhibitions of one of the world's finest museums all contribute to the variety, the challenge, and the resonance of the educational experience.
The small art school, which expanded from one rented facility within the city to another and was burned out of its first permanent home by the Chicago Fire, incorporated as the Chicago Academy of Fine Art in 1879, and changed its name to The Art Institute of Chicago in 1882.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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