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Encyclopedia > Scavenger
Raven feeding on a small dead shark
Raven feeding on a small dead shark
Harvestman eating the tail of a five-lined skink
Harvestman eating the tail of a five-lined skink

Scavengers are animals that consume already dead animals (carrion). Scavengers play an important role in the ecosystem by contributing to the decomposition of dead animal remains. Decomposers complete this process, by consuming the remains left by scavengers. A scavenger pouring water onto the paper she has collected, in order to increase the weight of, and thus the profit made from, her collection, in Hong Kong. ... Scavenger can refer to: Scavenger, an animal that feeds on carcasses Scavenger (chemistry), a method of removing impurities Scavenger (comics), two comic book characters Scavenger (Transformers), characters in the Transformers series Scavengers (tv show), a British game show Scavenger hunt, a game Scavenger, Inc. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 797 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Raven (crow?) scavenging (feeding)) on a dead small shark at the beach in Kumamoto, Japan. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 797 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Raven (crow?) scavenging (feeding)) on a dead small shark at the beach in Kumamoto, Japan. ... Species See text. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Harvestman eating the tail of a five-lined skink. ... Image File history File links Harvestman eating the tail of a five-lined skink. ... The Phalangids or Opiliones (better known as harvestmen or daddy longlegs) are eight-legged invertebrate animals belonging to the order Opiliones in the class Arachnida, in the subphylum Chelicerata of the phylum Arthropoda. ... Binomial name Eumeces fasciatus Linnaeus, 1758 The Five-lined Skink (Eumeces fasciatus) is one of the most common lizards in the eastern U.S. and one of the five species of lizards in Canada. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... “Spoilage” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Saprotroph be merged into this article or section. ...


Well known scavengers include vultures, burying beetles, blowflies, and raccoons. Many large carnivores that hunt regularly--such as hyenas and lions--will scavenge if given the chance. Orders Falconiformes (Fam. ... Species See text. ... Subfamilies Calliphorinae Chrysomyiinae The Blowflies are members of the family Calliphoridae of flies (Diptera). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Common Raccoon native range in red, feral range in blue. ... This tigers sharp teeth and strong jaws are the classical physical traits expected from carnivorous mammalian predators A carnivore (IPA: ), meaning meat eater (Latin carne meaning flesh and vorare meaning to devour), is an animal that eats a diet consisting mainly of meat, whether it comes from live animals... Subfamilies and Genera Hyaenidae Crocuta Hyaena Parahyaena Protelinae Proteles Hyenas or Hyænas are moderately large terrestrial carnivores native to Africa, Arabia, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ...


Animals which consume feces, such as dung beetles, are also referred to as scavengers. Animals which primarily consume dead plants (litter) are referred to as detritivores. Horse feces Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is a waste product from an animals digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during defecation. ... Genera not a complete list Agestrata Augosoma Canthon Chrysina Chalcosoma Chelorrhina Cheirolasia Cheirotonus Cotinis Dynastes Eudicella Goliathus Megsoma Onthophagus Pachnoda Phanaeus Plusiotis Ranzania Rhomborrhina Stephanorrhina Xylotrupes The scarab is a type of beetle noted for rolling dung into spherical balls and pushing it, as well as its habit of laying... A dung beetle rolling a ball of dung Detritivores (also known as saprophages, detrivores or detritus feeders) are organisms that recycle detritus (decomposing organic material), returning it into the food chain. ...


See also

This tigers sharp teeth and strong jaws are the classical physical traits expected from carnivorous mammalian predators A carnivore (IPA: ), meaning meat eater (Latin carne meaning flesh and vorare meaning to devour), is an animal that eats a diet consisting mainly of meat, whether it comes from live animals... A dung beetle rolling a ball of dung Detritivores (also known as saprophages, detrivores or detritus feeders) are organisms that recycle detritus (decomposing organic material), returning it into the food chain. ... It has been suggested that Saprotroph be merged into this article or section. ... Necrophagy is the act of feeding on corpses or carrion. ... A Saprotroph (or saprobe) is an organism that obtains its nutrients from non-living organic matter, usually dead and decaying plant or animal matter, by absorbing soluble organic compounds. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ...

References

  • Smith TM, Smith RL (2006) Elements of Ecology. Sixth edition. Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA.
  • Chase, et al. The Scavenger Handbook. Bramblewood Press, Santa Barbara, CA.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Scavenger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (276 words)
Scavengers are useful to the ecosystem by feeding on and therefore breaking down dead animal and plant remains.
The remains that are left behind by the scavengers are then used even further by decomposers.
Scavenger is also what the British refer to one who is employed to remove dirt and refuse from the streets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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