FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Scarecrow (comics)
The Scarecrow


The Scarecrow, from Batman #373, July 1984. Art by Ed Hannigan and Dick Giordano. This article is about the comic book company. ... The Scarecrow is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe, in which he is an enemy of Spider-Man and Ghost Rider. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Batman 373 This image is a book cover. ... Batman is an ongoing comic book series featuring the DC Comics action hero of the same name. ... Ed Hannigan has been a writer, artist and editor of comic books for both Marvel Comics and DC Comics. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance World's Finest Comics #3 (Fall 1941)
Created by Bill Finger
Bob Kane
Characteristics
Alter ego Jonathan Crane
Team
affiliations
Assorted Batman rogues
Injustice Gang
Secret Society of Super Villains
Abilities - Well-educated on the psychology of fear
- Develops various tools which induce crippling fear
- May transform under duress into the monstrous "Scarebeast", gaining superhuman strength, endurance, and a more potent hallucinogen.

The Scarecrow (Dr. Jonathan Crane) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. Created by Batman creators Bill Finger and Bob Kane, he first appeared in World's Finest Comics #3 (Fall 1941). His scarecrow costume, lanky appearance and surname were inspired by Ichabod Crane of the horror fable The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Alex Ross Jokers Reckoning. ... The Injustice Gang (also known as the Injustice Gang of the World) is a group of fictional supervillains in the DC Comics universe. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... by William J. Wilgus, artist chromolithograph, c. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a short story by Washington Irving contained in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. ...


The Scarecrow is an insane former professor of psychology/psychiatrist who uses a variety of drugs and psychological tactics to utilize the fears and phobias of his adversaries. He does not commit his crimes for wealth, but rather as a form of "research" to further study the effects of fear on humans, making the innocent citizens of Gotham his unwilling guinea pigs. For other uses, see Drug (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Phobia (disambiguation). ... Human experimentation involves medical experiments performed on human beings. ...


The Scarecrow made only two appearances in the 1940s. Batman writers of the 1960s revived him and he has since consistently appeared in Batman comic books. He was featured several times in the Emmy-winning 1990s cartoon Batman: The Animated Series, where he was first played by Henry Polic II. When the series was revamped and shown together with Superman: The Animated Series, the character was voiced by Jeffrey Combs. In the 2005 film Batman Begins, he was played by Cillian Murphy. The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... An Emmy Award. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Henry Polic II (born February 20, 1945 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American stage, screen, and voice actor. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Jeffrey Alan Combs (born September 9, 1954 in Oxnard, California) is an American character actor best known for his horror film roles and his appearances playing a number of characters in the Star Trek franchise. ... For the novel based on the film, see Batman Begins (novelization). ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ...

Contents

Fictional character biography

Golden Age

Elements of the Scarecrow fear gas appeared in Batman publications prior to his first appearnace. For instance, the idea of fear gas first appeared in Detective Comics #46 December 1940, in a story featuring Professor Strange, in which Strange uses a special fear dust in order to scare the Police and successfully rob a bank. Later Strange gets the idea to take over the US Government.


In his first appearance in World's Finest #3 during the Golden Age of Comic Books, the Scarecrow is first introduced as Jonathan Crane, a professor of psychology, who turns to crime after he is fired; an expert in the psychology of fear, he had fired a gun in a classroom full of students to illustrate a point. The only thing revealed about his early life is that, as a child, he had liked to frighten birds. Ostracized by his fellow professors for his appearance and reclusiveness, he turned to crime to make himself part of the social elite. His modus operandi is to use his Scarecrow persona and threaten his victims into doing whatever he wants. In terms of his costume, he merely wore ragged black hat, trenchcoat, mask, and wielded a Tommy gun. Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Modus operandi (often used in the abbreviated form MO) is a Latin phrase, approximately translated as mode of operation. ... The Thompson submachine gun, also known as the Tommy gun, was an American submachine gun (SMG) that became infamous during the Prohibition era. ...


His first crime involved a businessman named Frank Kendrick being sued by a former partner, Paul Harold. When Herold refused to cooperate upon meeting and hearing his demands, the Scarecrow killed him and became a media sensation. Bruce Wayne, who happens to be a patron and trustee of the university, investigates the matter as Batman and discovers Crane's disturbing behaviour and forced resignation, leading him to suspect the professor. In his second appearance, he approached a store owner named Dodge with the offer to rob other establishments, in order to increase his sales. After Batman and Robin learn of the plan and question Dodge, Scarecrow attempts to kill him, but the Dynamic Duo capture him in the nick of time. He is then sent to Gotham State Penitentiary.


Two years later in Detective Comics #73, he escapes from jail and forms a gang of criminals to do his bidding. While he struggles to rob a Chinese antique dealer, Batman and Robin foil the plan, and he and his cronies are sent back to prison. This version of the Scarecrow was much like other gimmick villains in that he based a lot of crimes around nursery rhymes and words that rhymed with "hat." He does not appear from 1943 to 1955, but it is revealed that he developed a hallucinogenic chemical toxin that could be used to envoke deep phobias within those who breathe it in. When Batman tries to intervene, he is affected by the toxin and hallucinates that all of his allies have disappeared; hinting at a strong case of autophobia. Feeling he has no once else to turn to, he confides in an old enemy, Selina Kyle, to help him stop Crane, and she is successful in helping stop the Scarecrow and getting Batman over his delusions. Exactly what happened to Crane is not revealed because of the revelation that the Golden Age universe was actually Earth-2, part of the Multiverse. Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... A gimmick is a unique or quirky special feature that makes something stand out from its contemporaries. ... Hallucinogenic drugs or hallucinogens are drugs that can alter sensory perceptions, elicit alternate states of consciousness, or cause hallucinations. ... Autophobia is a phobia (persistent and irrational fear) of being alone. ... Cover of Catwoman #2, February 2002. ... An example of the Terrian race Earth 2 was a short-lived television series which aired on NBC from 1994 - 1995. ... For other uses, see Multiverse (disambiguation). ...


Silver Age

Throughout the 60s Silver Age of Comic Books, the Scarecrow was revived to be one of Batman's most recurring rivals. He is a frequent member of the Injustice Gang. Ironically, in this Earth-One incarnation, Crane has a strange fear of birds, even though he has a pet magpie named Craw. Showcase #4 (Oct. ... The Injustice Gang (also known as the Injustice Gang of the World) is a group of fictional supervillains in the DC Comics universe. ... In DC Comics, the Multiverse was a continuity construct in which multiple fictional versions of the universe existed in the same space, separated from each other by their vibrational resonances. ...


Post-Crisis, Modern-Age Version

Following the 1986 multi-title event Crisis on Infinite Earths reboot, Crane's origin story was greatly expanded in the 1989 graphic novel Batman/Scarecrow #1, part of the Batman: Year One continuity. In the novel, he becomes obsessed with fear and revenge from being bullied throughout his childhood and adolescence for his lanky frame and bookish nature. He commits his first murder at the age of 18 by brandishing a gun in his high school parking lot during the senior prom. Dressed in the ghoulish scarecrow costume that would later become his trademark, Crane causes the head bully, Bo Griggs, and his girlfriend, Sherry Squires (who had rejected Crane), to have an automobile accident which paralyzes Griggs and kills Squires. From this, Crane discovers a savage delight in literally frightening people to death. This article is about the television program ReBoot. ... Batman: Year One was the title of a comic book written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzuchelli and colored/painted by Richmond Lewis, released in 1988 by DC Comics. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Bullying is the tormenting of others through verbal harassment, physical assault, or other more subtle methods of coercion such as manipulation. ... Scarecrows in a rice paddy in Japan For other uses, see Scarecrow (disambiguation). ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... Paralysed redirects here. ...


He grows up to become a professor of psychology at Gotham University, specializing in the psychology of fear. The flower pot incident is left intact, but the real reason he is fired is due to injuring a student by accident. After his dismissal, he kills the regents who fired him and becomes a career criminal. Following this, he transferred to Arkham Asylum and became a psychiatrist, where he performed more fear-induced experiments on his patients. He takes the moniker "the Scarecrow", the favorite taunt of the hated bullies, as part of his revenge. The 2005 miniseries, Batman/Scarecrow: Year One, expands upon the earlier origin story. The novels explains that Jonathan Crane was born out of wedlock and also suffered terrible abuse under his religious fanatic great-grandmother. His father took off before he was even born, and his mother did not show any love or affection towards her son at all, due to the fact that she did not where he was. He developed a taste for fear and an affinity for crows when his grandmother locks him in a dilapidated church full of birds. The story also shows Crane murdering his grandmother, and learning that his mother gave birth to a baby girl. A moniker (or monicker) is a pseudonym, or cognomen, which one gives to oneself. ...


During a Batman Confidential story arc, he is shown out of costume at Arkham Asylum still working as a pyschiatrist, while planning the renovation of Arkham, and he briefly comes face to face with the Pre-Joker Jack. Whether or not he has already become the Scarecrow is unknown. Batman Confidential is a monthly comic book series from DC Comics which debuted its first issue on December 6, 2006. ... The Joker can mean any of the following: The Joker is a comic strip character, also included in movies and television programs based on the comic strip. ...


History in the Batman universe

In the Knightfall storyline, 1993, he was one of the prisoners that escaped. He first attacked one of Joker's henchmen and he told Scarecrow that his boss was after the commissioner. Scarecrow went to the Joker and decided to become partners in terrorizing the mayor. Soon they went to the sewers with the mayor were Batman arrived. Scarecrow gassed him with fear toxic but instead Batman got angry. So Scarecrow made the water come into the sewers. Batman escaped with the mayor but Joker and Scarecrow escaped as well. Later, at Scarecrow and Joker's hideout, Scarecrow was bashed by Joker after he tries to poison him. He was then sent to Arkham. These stories were in Knightfall parts 5, 6, 7, 9 and 12. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


It wasn't long before he escaped again, this time wanting to become the God of Fear. He brought together a small group of boys to terrorize the city while he enjoyed to chaos. Soon, Batman and Anarky arrived and together they defeated the Scarecrow and saved the boys. But this time Batman was different. These stories were in the Shadow of the Bat 16, 17 and 18.


In a 1998 Scarecrow special "Mistress Of Fear" written by Peter Milligan, the Scarecrow is jailed after being testified against by a young girl called Becky Albright. Through the constant teasing by his supervillain peers, the Joker & the Riddler, inside prison Crane considered Becky to be his natural nemesis at first since he could not scare her into not testifying against him to begin with. After initially breaking out of jail again he opted to take his time and eventually give her every fear he could think of just to shatter her very being and make her afraid of him at last. The Scarecrow appeared as promised on a subway train and used every 'Fearomone' he had on her. In the following week Crane in disguise as a janitor visits a recovering Becky in a Hospital and finds out that she and him were exactly alike all along (made fun of simply because of the way they look) and also that she had done something that he had never done by keeping her feelings in check and kept living her life normally. Disturbed by this revelation, the Scarecrow paid one final visit to Becky upon her release and offered for her to join him as his "Mistress of Fear", offering her to lash out against her own psychological tormentors, but Becky promptly rejects him and causes the Scarecrow to almost kill her as Batman finally arrives and pins him to the ground in the climax. Emotionally hurt and confused the Scarecrow calls out that she has allowed all of the people who have taunted her all her life to simply get away with it and states that she is everything that he himself hates. Batman finally adds as the special ends that if Crane had wanted to, he could have killed her anyway when he had the chance; instead, she wasn't everything he hated, but rather everything that he feared. Peter Milligan is an Irish writer, best known for his comic book, film and television work. ... The Joker can mean any of the following: The Joker is a comic strip character, also included in movies and television programs based on the comic strip. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


In "Fear of Success" Johnathan Crane is released from Arkham Asylum for one day by Human Resources in order to give a motivational speech to Wayne Enterprises, much to Bruce Wayne and Lucius Fox's reluctance, during of which Crane goes to severe length marking out the multitude of normal fears with which can be simply underestimated and finally pointing out whilst grinning fanatically that he himself is a very good example of this case. As he finishes his speech his 'Fearomone' gas starts leaking everywhere and he reveals himself in his Scarecrow attire once again. During the ensuing chaos the Scarecrow is caught once more but due to the extent of the Scarecrow's 'Fearomone' gas this time, Batman starts to hallucinate over and over that Sasha Bordeaux tells him his loved one's had just died whilst everything was happening at Wayne Enterprises. Batman tries to overcome the repeating scenes of monotonous tragedy until he storms out in the final one carrying the binded Scarecrow upon his back. In the final pages of the comic whilst transporting Johnathan Crane back to Arkham Asylum Bruce Wayne is shocked by the crowding of the media around his home that Lucius Fox had indeed suffered a stroke as told by Sasha earlier and that the Scarecrow's final scene of the tragedy had indeed wrung true after all. In stories written by Jeph Loeb, such as Batman: The Long Halloween and Batman: Hush, Crane is shown to have an inclination to sing nursery rhymes at times. In the Elseworlds story, Batman: Crimson Mist, Crane was shown to be singing a modified version of "Ding, Dong, The Witch Is Dead", from The Wizard of Oz. For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Sasha Bordeaux is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... Joseph Jeph Loeb III (b. ... Published 2002-2003 in monthly installments in Batman issues 608-619 by DC Comics Characters Batman (Bruce Wayne), Catwoman (Selina Kyle), Superman (Clark Kent), Nightwing (Dick Grayson), Robin (Tim Drake), The Joker, The Riddler, Hush, Scarecrow, Huntress, Ras al Ghul, Lex Luthor, Two-Face, Commissioner James Gordon, Oracle, Harley... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the No Man's Land storyline in 1999, Scarecrow didn't have the chemicals and resources necessary to make his fear gas. He was taken in by a merciful Church mission which provided free food and shelter to refugees of the earthquake. The Minister of the Church told the Huntress that without Scarecrow's fear gas, the Church and it's refugees had nothing to fear from Crane since he is now "just a man." The Scarecrow later manipulated the Minister and a former Black Mask Gang Member, Mikey, into believing that receiving crates of weapons and ammunition from The Penguin would help and protect the Church. Scarecrow then told rival Gotham Gangs such as the GCPD, Penguin's Gang and former Black Mask members of the weapon crates in the Church. Crane wished to watch the carnage and fear ensue as each gang would either fight or defend for the weapons and ammo. Eventually, the Scarecrow coaxes members of the Church to pick up the weapons and defend themselves from the attackers. The Church members are soon told by a surviving former Black Mask Gang Member, Leo, about how they've been manipulated by the Scarecrow. Crane finds this situation ironic and thinks the oncoming onslaught from the Church members will make him a martyr for his own cause. Before the Church members beat the Scarecrow to death, the Huntress intervenes and convinces the Church members that the Scarecrow is a small and pathetic man that shouldn't be beaten dead. Instead, he should be praised because he's shown the church how much they have left to lose when there's so little left. The members then begin to praise Scarecrow and many members say they will pray for him and become his friend. This horrifies the Scarecrow, resulting in him abandonning the Church, removing half his costume and burning it in a trash can.


Crane undergoes a major change in the 2004 Batman story arc As The Crow Flies. While working with the Penguin, he is mutated into a monster. He turns into this "Scarebeast" during times of great strain or when it is necessary to defend himself. The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ...


Scarecrow rejoins the new Secret Society of Super Villains, and is part of the assault on the Secret Six (Villains United #6). He is caught in an explosion caused by Parademon. He is later seen in Villains United Special #1, alive and well. He is also seen in Detective Comics #820 as part of One Year Later, where he is defeated by Batman and Robin. In this appearance he is depicted in a costume that appeared to be an amalgamation of his original costume and the costume seen in Batman Begins. The Secret Six is the name of three distinct, fictional comic book teams in the DC Comics universe, plus an alternate universes fourth team. ... Villains United is a six-issue comic book limited series, written by Gail Simone with art by Dale Eaglesham and Wade von Grawbadger, published by DC Comics in 2005. ... In the DC Universe, parademons are monstrous shock troops of Apokolips used by Darkseid to maintain the order of Apokolips. ...


Recently, the Scarecrow has decided to stop using his typical fear gas, as he feared that other Arkham Inmates were right that he was nothing without them. Instead relying on his training as a psychologist, he drives two inmates to suicide using only his words, also apparently terrifying the rest of Arkham's inmates. After manipulating the guards to freeing him, Crane embarks upon a string of vicious serial murders, terrifying Gotham without using his trademark gimmicks.


Company crossovers

Scarecrow tags another victim in a scene from Judgement on Gotham. Art by Simon Bisley.
Scarecrow tags another victim in a scene from Judgement on Gotham. Art by Simon Bisley.

In the 2000 AD Batman/Judge Dredd crossover comic Judgement on Gotham, by writers Alan Grant and John Wagner, Scarecrow is shown breaking into a morgue along with his Igor-like henchman Benny, collecting various juices from corpses to include in his fear gas. He delights in scaring "a ghost" by creeping up on it and saying "boo". The ghost turns out to be the spirit of Judge Death, whom he promptly allies with on the basis that the Judge can show him "a veritable feassst of fffear". After inhabiting a corpse, Judge Death dispatches Benny, but is treated to a whiff of fear gas, revealing his fear of losing his power to frighten. The Scarecrow ushers the Judge to a rock festival, where all carnage ensues (he records it on camera for "his private collection"). Scarecrow is apprehended when Judge Dredd's partner Anderson shoots his can of fear gas, dousing him with it and sending him into a terrified delusion that he is being attacked by birds. Judge Death is taken down by the combined efforts of Batman and Dredd. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (927x437, 340 KB) The Scarecrow claims another victim. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (927x437, 340 KB) The Scarecrow claims another victim. ... Published by DC Comics, Judgement on Gotham is the first of two Batman/Judge Dredd crossovers. ... Simon Bisley (born March 4, 1962) is a British comic book artist best known for his 1990s work on ABC Warriors, Lobo and Sláine. ... Cover of the first issue of 2000 AD, 26 February 1977. ... For the 1995 film, see Judge Dredd (film). ... Published by DC Comics, Judgement on Gotham is the first of two Batman/Judge Dredd crossovers. ... For others of the same name, see Alan Grant. ... John Wagner is a comics writer who has also written under the pseudonyms John Howard, T.B. Grover, Mike Stott, Keef Ripley, Rick Clark and Brian Skuter, among others. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Body (disambiguation). ... Judge Death and his lieutenants Fear, Mortis and Fire - artwork by Brian Bolland Judge Death is a fictional character of the Judge Dredd universe recounted in the UK comic 2000 AD. He is the leader of the Dark Judges, a sinister group of undead law enforcers from the alternate dimension...


The second Batman/Daredevil crossover book features Scarecrow in New York, apparently attempting to kill Wilson Fisk (aka the Kingpin) and take over his crime operation. In reality, this is merely a setup to draw attention from his true scheme: unleashing a massive dose of fear toxin into an incoming storm from atop the Statue of Liberty. This would spread the gas throughout New York City, causing all its citizens to suffer like "Sodom and Gomorrah." In the end, he blasts Daredevil with a dose of fear toxin, but Daredevil lives up to his "Man Without Fear" trademark by quickly brushing off the effects of the gas and defeating Scarecrow. For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... The Kingpin (Wilson Fisk) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics villain who has battled many Marvel crime-fighters; most often Spider-Man, Daredevil and The Punisher. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Sodom and Gomorrah (disambiguation). ...


Other appearances

The Scarecrow also makes a cameo appearance in The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes. Specifically, he appears in Sandman #5: "Passengers" as a friend of Doctor Destiny at Arkham Asylum. He quotes Goethe and attempts to dissuade Destiny from escaping, saying Arkham is a better home for their kind than the outside world. (See Characters of The Sandman - Minor Mortals) A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Preludes and Nocturnes is the first graphic novel collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. ... Doctor Destiny is a fictional supervillain published by DC Comics. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... This is a list of characters appearing in The Sandman comic book, published by DC Comics Vertigo imprint. ...


Later, Sandman characters Cain And Abel make a guest appearance in one of Jonathan Crane's dreams in The New Batman Adventures, in which they briefly pretend to be prison administrators allocating him to a teaching job following his parole. However, though they resemble Cain And Abel physically, their personalities and habits are radically different - Cain makes no witticisms, while Abel repeats Cain's sentences rather than stutter - and both have small horns entangled in their hair. Cain and Abel are a pair of fictional characters in the DC Comics universe based on the Biblical Cain and Abel. ... The New Batman Adventures was the successor to the highly acclaimed American animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ...


In JSA: The Liberty Files, an alternate version of the Scarecrow appears as a Nazi agent of Adolf Hitler. This version of the Scarecrow is eventually killed by Mister Terrific, the Batman and Hourman. National Socialism redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Mister Terrific is the name of two different superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ...


Crane also teams up with his Marvel Comics counterpart in Marvel vs. DC (see below). This article is about the comic book company. ... DC vs Marvel Comics or Marvel Comics vs DC is a 4-issue limited series published by DC Comics and Marvel in 1996. ...

Scarecrow is mutated into the terrifying Scarebeast. Art by Dustin Nguyen and Richard Friend.
Scarecrow is mutated into the terrifying Scarebeast.
Art by Dustin Nguyen and Richard Friend.

Image File history File links Scarebeast. ... Image File history File links Scarebeast. ...

Powers and abilities

Fear evocation

Crane is a psychologist with a specialty in phobias. Using a variety of toxins that cause his victims to hallucinate that their phobias have come to life, the Scarecrow can instill fear in all who see him. In Batman Begins, the fear toxin he uses is extracted from a mountaintop blue flower from China, and only works in vapour form. Crane uses his Scarecrow mask to enhance the effect of the hallucinogen. For other uses, see Toxin (disambiguation). ... A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... For other uses, see Phobia (disambiguation). ...


Unarmed combat

When forced to fight, he has used a style called "violent dancing", which is based in partly off the crane style of kung fu and drunken boxing, which makes full use of his long arms and legs. Most storylines however have suggested he has no real means of hand-to-hand combat, presenting him as physically unintimidating. This article is about the Fujian style of White Crane. ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... Zuijiuquan (醉酒拳), commonly known as Drunken Boxing or Drunken Fist, but also translated as Drunkards Boxing, is a southern style of Wushu that imitates a drunkard in its movements. ...


Scarebeast

During the "As the Crow Flies" story arc (commencing with Batman #627, July 2004), the Scarecrow is transformed into a murderous creature known as the Scarebeast by the Penguin and his assistant Linda Friitawa (Fright) to kill off his disloyal colleagues. Through the intensely traumatic mutation, the Scarebeast possesses super strength, endurance, clawed hands and can release an even stronger hallucinogenic gas. After being defeated by Batman by injecting it with massive amounts of tranquilizers, the Scarebeast reverts back into Jonathan Crane, who ends up in a critical coma, from which he later awakens. The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... Trauma can represent: Physical trauma, an often serious and body-altering physical injury, such as the removal of a limb. ... For linguistic mutation, see Apophony. ... A sedative is a drug that depresses the central nervous system (CNS), which causes calmness, relaxation, reduction of anxiety, sleepiness, slowed breathing, slurred speech, staggering gait, poor judgment, and slow, uncertain reflexes. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ...


The Scarecrow has also transformed into the Scarebeast in the "War Games" story arc. However, the Scarebeast has yet to be seen again after this storyline, and his recent appearances in Villains United Special and Batman seem to indicate the Scarebeast may be gone. Villains United is a six-issue comic book limited series, written by Gail Simone with art by Dale Eaglesham and Wade von Grawbadger, published by DC Comics in 2005. ...


In other media

Animated television series

The Batman/Superman Hour

The Scarecrow's first appearance outside the comics was the 1968 Filmation series The Batman/Superman Hour, in an episode titled "The Great Scarecrow Scare". This series' portrayal of the character was tamer than others; he didn't use fear-based attacks, and merely wanted to rob the farmers' market. The first Filmation logo. ... The Batman/Superman Hour was a Filmation animated series that was broadcast on CBS from 1968–1969. ...


Super Friends

In the 1978 animated series Challenge of the SuperFriends, the Scarecrow appears as a member of Lex Luthor's Legion of Doom. In this series, he is voiced by Don Messick. This version speaks in a hissing voice, has no powers at all and is used mainly when the plot calls for an incompetent villain[citation needed]. An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... Lex Luthor (Alexander Luthor) is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and is the primary antagonist of the Superman franchise. ... This article is about the supervillain group. ... Donald Don Messick (September 7, 1926 – October 24, 1997) was a voice actor, one of the most prolific voice actors of the second half of the 20th century. ... Look up plot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The character's identity and motivation are expanded upon and the character finally became three-dimensional, using his fear-inducing devices for the first time in an episode of The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians titled "The Fear". That episode also reveals Batman's origin for the first time in a medium other than the comics[citation needed]. Andre Stojka voiced the Scarecrow in that episode.


Batman: The Animated Series

The Scarecrow is a villain in Batman: the Animated Series. He has appeared in 5 major roles, as well as having 4 small cameo appearances. He is well-known for having variable character designs, changing drastically from time to time. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ...


Batman: the Animated Series

Scarecrow as he appeared for most of Batman: The Animated Series.
Scarecrow as he appeared for most of Batman: The Animated Series.

In his first appearance in the DC Animated Universe, the third episode of Batman: the Animated Series entitled Nothing to Fear, the Scarecrow's past is revealed in a flashback. As in the comics that spawned the series, the Scarecrow's real name is Jonathan Crane, and his fascination with fear emerged as a young child. While growing up, Crane constantly experimented with the effects of fear, eventually becoming a professor at a university where he worked on developing fear toxins, conducting experiments on human guinea pigs. Shortly after creating a fear toxin that caused victims to see their greatest fear, Crane was fired by Dr. Long, the head of the university, for his unorthodox and dangerous methods. Crane then became the Scarecrow, and attempted to exact revenge upon the university and Dr. Long. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ...


While attempting to burn down the university, the Scarecrow succeeded in hitting Batman with a dart filled with fear toxin. Batman foiled the arson attempt, but the toxins had a great effect on him. Dr. Long had recently claimed that he was a disgrace to his father's name, and it became clear that Batman's greatest fear was his father's rejection, and he was haunted with images of his father mocking him. This was Batman's weak point in this battle against the Scarecrow, and when the Scarecrow attacked the university a second time, Batman had to struggle to ignore the images. He managed to overcome his fear, forcing himself to realize that the visions were not real and convincing himself that his father was proud of him. Because of this, Batman was able to defeat the Scarecrow's henchmen and arrest the villain. During this encounter, Scarecrow is exposed to his own fear gas and is revealed to suffer from a phobia of bats.


The Scarecrow makes his next appearance in the episode Fear of Victory, in which he fixes sporting events by giving telegrams dusted with his powdered fear toxins to the players. Crane, having bet on the other team, wins large quantities of money, with which he buys the chemicals he uses in his research. In a confrontation at the end of the episode, Robin, who was previously affected by the powder, manages to overcome his fears and prevents the Scarecrow from dropping a vial of fear toxins on the crowd below. Fear of Victory is the nineteenth episode of Batman: The Animated Series and the second appearance of The Scarecrow and Robin in the DC Animated Universe. ...


In his third and final appearance, in the episode Dreams In Darkness the Scarecrow plans to poison Gotham's water supply with his fear toxins to discover what would happen when a whole city went mad with fear. When Batman fought one of his henchmen, he once again got a dose of fear gas, and experiences hallucinations of his parents getting murdered, his worst enemies triumphing over him, and his greatest friends turning against him. Batman manages to fight his fear once again, and infects Scarecrow with his own gas then sends him back to prison, terrified. Dreams in Darkness is the 28th episode of Batman: The Animated Series. ...


The Scarecrow has no other major appearances in the original animated series, but does have some cameo appearances. He appeared playing chess with the Mad Hatter in Joker's Wild, and was seen being arrested again in Harley's Holiday. In the episode Trial, he didn't have a speaking role, and was seen only escorting the prisoners and attempting to kill Batman with a scythe. In the episode Lock-Up, the Scarecrow was said to be the only prisoner to escape from Lyle Bolton, a security guard who used methods of torture against the prisoners, but not to commit any crimes - only because he was terrified of him. Ultimately, after Bolton went rogue and was arrested, the Scarecrow was last seen, uncostumed, triumphantly watching him and promising to teach him new lessons in fear. The following is an episode list for the animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ... Trial is an episode of the Warner Bros. ...


The New Batman Adventures

The appearance of the Scarecrow from The New Batman Adventures episode "Over the Edge".
The appearance of the Scarecrow from The New Batman Adventures episode "Over the Edge".

The Scarecrow also appears in the New Batman Adventures, in an episode called Never Fear. Here, he had a different scheme; he infects his victims with a gas that removes fear, causing them to become reckless risk-takers. The Scarecrow infects Batman with this anti-fear gas, causing him to go berserk and try and kill his enemies. The Scarecrow holds the city ransom, demanding large sums of money in exchange for the antidote to the gas's effects. Batman tries to kill the Scarecrow, who is saved by Robin, and the Scarecrow is arrested. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The New Batman Adventures was the successor to the highly acclaimed American animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ... The New Batman Adventures was the successor to the highly acclaimed television program Batman: The Animated Series. ... The following is an episode list for the animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ...


In the New Batman Adventure episode Over the Edge, the Scarecrow kills Batgirl by knocking her over the side of a building. The police blame Batman, discover his secret identity, and attempt to arrest him. Commissioner Gordon hires Bane to help him capture Batman, which results in Batman's death. However, at the end of the episode, this is revealed to be Batgirl's dream, caused by the Scarecrow's fear gas. Over the Edge is the title of an episode from The New Batman Adventures. ...


Bruce Timm, the show's creator, writer, and part-time director, felt that the Scarecrow was supposed to be scary, and that so far he didn't look right and that none of the designs were working, as he said in one of the conversations on the DVD. When the New Batman Adventures came out, the designers completely redesigned the Scarecrow, giving him a twisted death mask with completely blank eyes and a noose around his neck, dressed all in black and looking more like a corpse than a Scarecrow. In this version, he was also given a new voice, said to make the Scarecrow sound creepier (provided by Jeffrey Combs). This version was never shown out of his costume. Timm actually commented that there may in fact not even be a person inside the costume of this version of the Scarecrow. Bruce Walter Timm (born on February 8, 1961) is an American character designer, animator and producer. ... Jeffrey Alan Combs (born September 9, 1954 in Oxnard, California) is an American character actor best known for his horror film roles and his appearances playing a number of characters in the Star Trek franchise. ...


Other

The Scarecrow never appears in Batman Beyond, nor is he mentioned. However, in the animated movie, Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker, there is a member of the Jokerz gang, Ghoul, whose design resembles the Scarecrow's, and his costume is possibly influenced by Batman's old enemy. The Batman Beyond villain Spellbinder, like the Scarecrow, is also able to show people horrific illusions. Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker is a direct-to-video animated film featuring the comic book superhero Batman. ...


As part of the original 13 members of the Legion of Doom, the Scarecrow was originally slated to appear again in the DC Animated Universe in the third season of Justice League Unlimited, but apparently due to a "Bat-Embargo" enforced by Warner Bros., this did not occur. This article is about the supervillain group. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... “WB” redirects here. ...


The Scarecrow was set to appear in The Batman, but was not included because he appeared in Batman Begins. However, a picture of the unused design is at this link. According to writer Joseph Kuhr, he had originally written the fourth season episode, "Strange New World", to introduce Scarecrow into the show, only to find the character was still off-limits to them. The Batman is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


Film

Batman Begins

Main article: Batman Begins

The Scarecrow was originally going to appear in the cancelled Batman Triumphant project that would have taken place after Batman & Robin, but due to that film's mediocre box-office performance, Batman Triumphant never came to fruition. Ewan McGregor, Steve Buscemi, Jeff Goldblum and Christopher Lloyd were considered for the role.[citation needed] For the novel based on the film, see Batman Begins (novelization). ... Ewan Gordon McGregor (born March 31, 1971) (IPA pronunciation: [1]) is a Scottish actor who has had significant success in mainstream, indie and art house films. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Jeffrey Lynn Goldblum (born October 22, 1952) is an Academy-Award nominated American actor. ... For other persons named Christopher Lloyd, see Christopher Lloyd (disambiguation). ...

Cillian Murphy portraying the Scarecrow in Batman Begins
Cillian Murphy portraying the Scarecrow in Batman Begins

The Scarecrow appears in the 2005 movie Batman Begins, portrayed by Cillian Murphy. Much like his comic counterpart, this version of the Scarecrow is a corrupt, sadistic psychiatrist specializing in psychopharmacology at Arkham, secretly allied with Ra's al Ghul and Carmine Falcone, smuggling the former's hallucinogenic drugs into Gotham to create fear gas to use upon his patients in cruel experiments. He first appears in the film as Dr. Jonathan Crane, testifying in court that Victor Zsasz, who "butchers people for the mob", is legally insane and should be moved to Arkham for rehabilitation. This enrages Assistant District Attorney Rachel Dawes, who later accuses him of being corrupt. Crane then meets with Falcone to discuss having her murdered. When Falcone later attempts to blackmail Crane, Crane dons his Scarecrow mask for the first time in the film and douses Falcone with his fear gas, driving the mob boss insane and leaving him repeatedly uttering "scarecrow". Crane attributes this to him identifying the image with a Jungian archetype. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... For the novel based on the film, see Batman Begins (novelization). ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... Look up sadism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine dealing with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the mind and mental illness. ... Psychopharmacology is the study of the effects of any psychoactive drug that acts upon the mind by affecting brain chemistry. ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Carmine The Roman Falcone is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe who made his debut in the four part story Batman: Year One, written by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli, in 1987. ... An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... Victor Zsasz (referred to as Zsasz or Mr. ... Rachel Dawes is a fictional character created for the 2005 Batman film Batman Begins. ... For other uses, see Blackmail (disambiguation). ... According to Swiss psychologist Carl Jung, archetypes are innate universal psychic dispositions that form the substrate from which the basic themes of human life emerge. ...


In Crane's first encounter with Batman, he sprays Batman with his fear toxin and sets him on fire, though Batman narrowly escapes with his life and mind intact. With the help of Lucius Fox, Batman acquires an antidote to the toxin. Shortly thereafter, Batman has a second confrontation with Crane, this time at Arkham, where he must rescue Rachel Dawes after Crane has sprayed her with his toxin. Batman overpowers Crane's henchmen and sprays the doctor with a dose of his own medicine, destroying what's left of his sanity and divulging his real superior: Ra's Al Ghul. Crane is subsequently arrested by James Gordon, but later escapes in the mass release of Arkham inmates prompted by Ra's Al Ghul as part of his plot to destroy Gotham. As Ra's Al Ghul unleashes Crane's fear gas on the Narrows, Crane, now calling himself Scarecrow, pursues Rachel and a boy through an alley on a horse, dragging a dead mounted police officer from its stirrups. Rachel eludes Scarecrow by shocking him in the face with a taser. Scarecrow aimlessly rides off into the night, screaming in pain. In the film's final scene, Gordon reveals that Crane is still at large. Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ...


Crane wears a mask, seemingly a poorly-stitched burlap sack with a hangman's noose dangling around the neck. The mask has a built-in rebreather and acts as a gas mask, and enhances the effect of the hallucinations in his experiments. The mask is put to good use when a victim is poisoned, making his appearance all the more terrifying to the victim (Batman hallucinates bats flying out of the "mouth", while Rachel hallucinates worms growing from it). He also wears an unbound straitjacket at the movie's climax due to his incarceration in and breakout from Arkham Asylum. Burlap is a dense woven fabric, usually made of jute and allied vegetable fibers. ... Hangmans knot The hangmans knot or hangmans noose (also known as a collar during Elizabethan times) is a well-known knot most often associated with its use in hanging. ... The climax (or turning point) of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. ...


A "second-stage" mask was designed for the film to be used in one of the final sequences. The mask during a hallucination would appear to almost be melting or dripping off his face, but such scenes were not included in the final cut. A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... In physics, melting is the process of heating a solid substance to a point (called the melting point) where it turns into a liquid. ... Dripping, beef dripping is an animal fat produced from the fatty or otherwise unusable parts of cow carcasses. ...


The Dark Knight

In an interview with Wizard Magazine, David S. Goyer said that the Scarecrow's role in The Dark Knight probably won't be much bigger than Willem Dafoe's role in Spider-Man 2.[citation needed] The Dark Knight is a 2008 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ... William Dafoe, Jr. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ...


Amalgam Comics

In Amalgam Comics, the Scarecrow is combined with Bloodscream to form Bloodcrow, and with the Scarecrow of Marvel Comics to form Scarecrow. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Scarecrow is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe, in which he is an enemy of Spider-Man and Ghost Rider. ...


Video games

The Scarecrow appears in four video games: Game Boy's Batman: The Animated Series, Super Nintendo & Genesis's Adventures of Batman & Robin, Batman Begins (a tie-in to the 2005 movie) and Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu. His role in the movie tie-in game is almost the same as the movie and is one of the game's boss fights. In the game, extra information is given about the Scarecrow's various quirks; he uses his patients as a form of personal army who frequently attack Batman in various levels. In Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu, he is dressed in rags and is the first major boss to fight in the game, spraying the player with fear gas. Computer and video games redirects here. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Adventures of Batman and Robin is based on popular DC Comics superheroes Batman and Robin. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ...


Lego sets

The Danish building toy company Lego recently introduced its Batman line of building sets, currently into its first wave. An incarnation of the scarecrow with his makeshift laboratory appears in 7785-Arkham Asylum set which includes Nightwing and his motorcycle as well. The Scarecrow appears as is his standard appearance in the comics and in Batman: The Animated Series. For other uses, see Lego (disambiguation). ... LEGO Batman is a theme of LEGO building sets based on the comics, films, and cartoons featuring the DC Comics superhero, Batman. ...


In a second wave, the Scarecrow pilots an old-style crop duster in an aerial fight against Batman's Batcopter in the set #7786 Batcopter: The Hunt For The Scarecrow. The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ...


Other Scarecrow

See also: Scarecrow (Marvel Comics)

There is a Marvel Comics supervillain named Ebineezer Laughton who also goes by the moniker "Scarecrow." He is primarily a foe of Ghost Rider and Spider-Man. Like Crane, he resembles a lanky field scarecrow when in costume (the most distinct visual difference between the two is that Crane's costume usually includes a straw hat). Though Laughton shares the ability to induce fear in others (albeit supernaturally), he is primarily known as a contortionist (similar to another villain, Ragdoll). During this Scarecrow's most recent appearance (And first after Batman Begins) in Sensational Spider-Man, it's joked several times by Spider-Man that "Yes. I have a Scarecrow villain too." The Scarecrow is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe, in which he is an enemy of Spider-Man and Ghost Rider. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Scarecrow is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe, in which he is an enemy of Spider-Man and Ghost Rider. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several fictional supernatural anti-heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Contortionist performing Contortion (sometimes contortionism) is an unusual form of acrobatic display which involves the bending of the human body into positions that would be impossible for most people to achieve. ... The Ragdoll is a colorful supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Cover to The Sensational Spider-Man #0. ...


In Marvel vs. DC, Laughton talked Crane into kidnapping Lois Lane, but Ben Reilly (out of costume) showed up and KO'd them both at the same time with a single kick. DC vs Marvel Comics or Marvel Comics vs DC is a 4-issue limited series published by DC Comics and Marvel in 1996. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... This article is about the fictional character. ...


Similarly, a Scarecrow action figure from Hasbro's Ghost Rider movie line bears at least some resemblance to the Batman Begins Scarecrow, as they have nearly identical burlap masks. Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is an American toy and game company. ... Ghost Rider is a 2007 superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Ghost Rider. ...

Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Although Bob Kane achieved renown for creating the fictional superhero Batman, he and others have acknowledged the contributions of Bill Finger for fleshing the character out, writing many of his early stories, and creating the characters origin. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Batman. ... Bane is a fictional character, associated with DC Comics Batman. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Clayface is a name used by several DC Comics fictional characters, most of them possessing clay-like bodies and shapeshifting abilities. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess, in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, later adapted into DC Comics Batman comic books. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Killer Croc is a fictional character in DC comics. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Mr. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Red Hood is a fictional character and title in the DC Universe. ... Jason Peter Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Ventriloquist is a DC Comics villain, an enemy of Batman. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... The Batcave. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Batman from all media, including DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
* Irene's Country Corner * - Scarecrows and Crows (395 words)
Scarecrows often appear in movies, cartoons, comics etc. Sometimes they are depicted as scary creatures, sometimes they are nice and friendly.
A scarecrow is a figure dressed up like a person which is placed on cultivated ground to keep birds or other animals away from the plantations.
The most popular scarecrow is a mannequin stuffed with straw; free-hanging, often reflective parts movable by the wind are commonly attached in order to increase its effectiveness.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m