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Encyclopedia > Scarecrow (Oz)
The Scarecrow

Cover of The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) by L. Frank Baum; illustration by John R. Neill.
First appearance The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900)
Last appearance arguable
Created by L. Frank Baum
Information
Aliases Chang Wang Woe (arguable)
Species animated clothing
Gender male in expression
Age unknown
Date of birth two days before Dorothy Gale found him
Date of death inapplicable
Occupation Farmer, Regent
Family N/A
Spouse(s) N/A
Children N/A
Relatives N/A
Address Corn Tower, Winkie Country
Nationality Munchkin


The Scarecrow is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and illustrator William Wallace Denslow. In his first appearance, the Scarecrow reveals that he lacks a brain and desires above all else to have one. Image File history File links Cover of the Scarecrow of Oz This image is a book cover. ... The Scarecrow of Oz is the ninth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... For the film, see The Wizard of Oz (1939 film). ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today... Doctor Who character, see Ace (Doctor Who). ... The Winkie Country is a division of the fictional Land of Oz. ... Munchkins are the natives of the fictional Munchkin Country in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Oz is a fantasy region containing four countries under the rule of one monarch. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today... William Wallace Denslow Copyright notice from Denslows Mother Goose of 1901 - note the use of the word, Rex even at that date William Wallace Denslow (May 5, 1856–March 29, 1915) was an illustrator and caricaturist remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his...

Contents

In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

In Baum's classic 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the living scarecrow encounters Dorothy Gale in a field in the Munchkin Country while she is on her way to the Emerald City. The "mindless" Scarecrow joins Dorothy in the hope that The Wizard will give him a brain. They are later joined by the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion. After Dorothy and her friends have completed their mission to kill the Wicked Witch of the West, the Wizard gives the Scarecrow brains (made out of bran, pins and needles – in reality a placebo, as he has been the most intelligent of the travellers all along). Before he leaves Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... For the film, see The Wizard of Oz (1939 film). ... Scarecrows in a rice paddy in Japan For other uses, see Scarecrow (disambiguation). ... Doctor Who character, see Ace (Doctor Who). ... Munchkins are the natives of the fictional Munchkin Country in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ... The Wizard, on the cover of Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... Cover of The Tin Woodman of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz (1929) by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... The Wicked Witch, as portrayed by Margaret Hamilton in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens books. ... // wheat bran Bran is the hard outer layer of and consists of combined aleurone and pericarp. ... For other uses, see Placebo (disambiguation). ...

 Oz in a balloon, the Wizard appoints the Scarecrow to rule Oz in his stead. 

His desire for brains notably contrasts with the Tin Woodman's desire for a heart, reflecting a common debate between the relative importance of the mind and the emotions. This, indeed, occasions philosophical debate between the two friends as to why their own choices are superior; neither convinces the other, and Dorothy, listening, is unable to decide which one is right. Symbolically, because they remain with Dorothy throughout her quest, she is provided with both and need not select.[1] Cover of The Tin Woodman of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ...


Scholarly interpretations

Denslow's drawing of scarecrow hung up on pole and helpless, from first edition of book, 1900
Denslow's drawing of scarecrow hung up on pole and helpless, from first edition of book, 1900
July 1896 Puck cartoon shows farmer hung up on pole and helpless; was this Denslow's inspiration? The hat says "silverite"; the locomotive is gold
July 1896 Puck cartoon shows farmer hung up on pole and helpless; was this Denslow's inspiration? The hat says "silverite"; the locomotive is gold

Economics and history professors have published scholarly studies that indicate the images and characters used by Baum and Denslow closely resembled political images that were well known in the 1890s. The Scarecrow, like other characters and elements in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was a common theme found in editorial cartoons of the previous decade. Baum and Denslow, like most writers, used the materials at hand that they knew best. They built a story around them, added Dorothy, and added a series of lessons to the effect that everyone possesses the resources they need (such as brains, a heart and courage) if only they had self confidence. Although it was a children’s book, of course, Baum noted in the preface that it was a "modernized" fairy tale as well. Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 452 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 640 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 452 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 640 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (611x783, 80 KB) Summary cartoon from PUCK magazine 1896 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (611x783, 80 KB) Summary cartoon from PUCK magazine 1896 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ...


Those who interpret The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a political allegory often see the Scarecrow, a central figure, as a reflection of the popular image of the American farmer—although he has been persuaded that he is only a dumb hick, he possesses a strong common sense, remarkable insight and quick-wittedness that needs only to be reinforced by self confidence. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Later Oz books

The Scarecrow also appears in other Oz books, sharing further adventures with Dorothy and her friends. His reign as king of the Emerald City ends in The Marvelous Land of Oz when he is ousted in a coup by General Jinjur and her Army of Revolt. He manages to escape the palace and joins Tip and his companions in seeking the aid of Glinda the Good. In The Emerald City of Oz, the Scarecrow lives in a house shaped like an ear of corn in Winkie Country. In The Scarecrow of Oz, the Scarecrow travels to Jinxland, where he helps Cap'n Bill, Trot and Button-Bright overthrow the villainous King Krewl. He is also the Emperor of the Silver Islands. The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... The Winkie Country is a division of the fictional Land of Oz. ... The Scarecrow of Oz is the ninth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum. ...


In Glinda of Oz the Scarecrow serves as Regent to Ozma of Oz, demonstrating that he is Ozma's third-in-command. Mostly all he does is play croquet until Ozma's advisers, including himself, band together for a rescue operation. Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book written by childrens author L. Frank Baum. ... For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ...


In The Royal Book of Oz, Professor Woggle-Bug accused the Scarecrow of having no ancestry, so he returns to the pole at the cornfield where he was once hung. Sliding down it and descending underground, he first encounters the Midlings and then the Silver Islands, whose people believe themselves to be the ancestors of the Chinese. Apparently, when Emperor Chang Wang Woe died, his ashed buried with some magic beans and the tears of his wife caused him to be reincarnated as the Scarecrow when his body was placed on the pole. This is, however, inconsistent with the Scarecrow's initial story becoming aware as each sensory organ was painted onto his face, well before he was placed on the pole. The Royal Book of Oz (1921) is the fifteenth Oz book in the Famous Forty, and the first to be written by Ruth Plumly Thompson after L. Frank Baums death. ...


The 1939 movie

Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz

In the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, the Scarecrow was played by Ray Bolger in what is arguably the actor's most famous role. Bolger was a talented dancer, so The Scarecrow was given an extended dance sequence in the movie. However, to shorten the movie, much of this sequence was edited out. United States entertainer Ray Bolger in his most famous role as the Scarecrow (Oz) from the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... United States entertainer Ray Bolger in his most famous role as the Scarecrow (Oz) from the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow (and the farmworker Hunk) who was Dorothys favorite in the 1939 film classic, The Wizard of Oz. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow (and the farmworker Hunk) who was Dorothys favorite in the 1939 film classic, The Wizard of Oz. ...


Bolger also portrayed the Scarecrow's Kansas counterpart, Hunk the farmhand. A scene which was written in the script, but dropped before filming commenced, ended the movie by sending Hunk off to agricultural college, with Dorothy promising to write. The scene implied the potential for a romance between the two characters.


Other actors who have played the Scarecrow in movies over the years include Mickey Rooney, Michael Jackson and Justin Case. Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Justin Case is a pseudonym used by author Hugh B. Cave when writing short stories [1] about The Eel and other characters in the Spicy pulp magazines of the 1930s and 40s. ...


Modern works

The Scarecrow is also a minor character in author Gregory Maguire's revisionist novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West and is made a more prominent character in its Broadway musical adaptation Wicked. In the musical, the Scarecrow is revealed to be the remnants of Fiyero after he was captured by the Wizard's officials, but made impervious to injury by Elphaba's incomplete spell. The Fiyero-Scarecrow executes a plan to save Elphaba through using the rumor that water will melt her; thus she stays alive and the two move into the Bad Lands. This has no basis in the book other than that in the final scenes Elphaba hopes that the Scarecrow is really her beloved Fiyero in disguise, which is proven to be a false hope when he is attacked and she sees that he is nothing but straw. The Scarecrow is featured more prominently in Son of a Witch, Maguire's sequel to Wicked. In that novel, the Scarecrow helps the Witch's son Liir avoid political turmoil in the Emerald City after the Wizard's departure. Later, various powerful interests place a different Scarecrow on the throne of Oz to serve as a puppet ruler; the suggestion is that most residents of Oz are unable to distinguish one Scarecrow from another. Gregory Maguire (born June 9, 1954 in Albany, New York) is an American author. ... Wicked, or Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, is a parallel novel by Gregory Maguire. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Wicked is a Tony award-winning American musical produced by Universal Pictures with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, and a book by Winnie Holzman. ... Norbert Leo Butz as Fiyero in the Original Broadway Cast of the musical Wicked, with Idina Menzel as Elphaba. ... Elphaba is the name given to the Wicked Witch of the West in Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire, as well as in the Broadway adaptation, Wicked. ... Son of a Witch book cover Son of a Witch is a sequel to Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, and the fifth revisionist novel written by Gregory Maguire. ... Liir (pronouced leer) is a supporting character in Gregory Maguires novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, and the protagonist of its sequel, Son of a Witch. ... A puppet is a representational object, usually but not always depicting a human character, used in play or a presentation. ...


In The Muppets' Wizard of Oz, Kermit the Frog plays the role of the Scarecrow. Promotional poster The Muppets Wizard of Oz, an original made-for-television movie, aired May 20, 2005 as a special Friday night edition of ABCs The Wonderful World of Disney. ... Kermit singing Bein Green in the first season of Sesame Street. ...


References

  1. ^ L. Frank Baum, Michael Patrick Hearn, The Annotated Wizard of Oz, p 141, ISBN 0-517-500868
  • Culver, Stuart. "What Manikins Want: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and The Art of Decorating Dry Goods Windows and Interiors", Representations, 21 (1988) 97-116.
  • Dighe, Ranjit S. ed. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (2002)
  • Green, David L. and Dick Martin. (1977) The Oz Scrapbook. Random House.
  • Hearn, Michael Patrick (ed). (2000, 1973) The Annotated Wizard of Oz. W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN 0-393-04992-2
  • Riley, Michael O. (1997) Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum. University of Kansas Press ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  • Ritter, Gretchen. "Silver slippers and a golden cap: L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and historical memory in American politics." Journal of American Studies (August 1997) vol. 31, no. 2, 171-203.
  • Rockoff, Hugh. "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory," Journal of Political Economy 98 (1990): 739-60 online at JSTOR
  • Sunshine, Linda. All Things Oz (2003)
  • Swartz, Mark Evan. Oz Before the Rainbow: L. Frank Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" on Stage and Screen to 1939 (2000).
  • Velde, Francois R. "Following the Yellow Brick Road: How the United States Adopted the Gold Standard" Economic Perspectives. Volume: 26. Issue: 2. 2002. also online here
  • Ziaukas, Tim. "100 Years of Oz: Baum's 'Wizard of Oz' as Gilded Age Public Relations" in Public Relations Quarterly, Fall 1998
Preceded by
The Wizard of Oz
Ruler of the Emerald City Succeeded by
Jinjur
Preceded by
Unknown
Silver Islands Succeeded by
Unknown

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Scarecrow of Oz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (803 words)
The Scarecrow of Oz is the ninth book set in the Land of Oz written by L.
The Scarecrow is at Glinda's palace in the Quadling Country and learns about these events from reading Glinda's Great Book of Records, a magical volume which transcribes every event in the world at the instant it happens.
The Scarecrow attempts to depose Krewl and is captured, with Googly-Goo suggesting the Scarecrow be burned, but then the Ork arrives with fifty others who attack the Jinxlanders and turn the tables on Krewl.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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