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Encyclopedia > Scalenus anterior muscle
Anterior scalene
Origin:
Insertion:
Blood:
Nerve:
Action: Elevate 1st rib, rotate the neck to the opposite side
Middle scalene
Origin:
Insertion:
Blood:
Nerve:
Action: Elevate 1st rib, rotate the neck to the opposite side
Posterior scalene
Origin:
Insertion:
Blood:
Nerve:
Action: Elevate 2nd rib, tilt the neck to the same side

The scalene muscles are a group of three pairs of muscles in the lateral neck, namely the anterior scalene, middle scalene, and posterior scalene. They originate from the lateral processes from the cervical vertebrae of C3 to C7 and insert onto the first and second ribs. They are innervated by the spinal nerves C3-C8. The action of the anterior and middle scalene muscles is to elevate the first rib and rotate the neck to the opposite side; the action of the posterior scale is to elevate the second rib and tilt the neck to the same side. A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... List of blood vessels This is an incomplete list, which can or may never satisfy any subjective standard for completeness. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... List of blood vessels This is an incomplete list, which can or may never satisfy any subjective standard for completeness. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... List of blood vessels This is an incomplete list, which can or may never satisfy any subjective standard for completeness. ... A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is a contractile form of tissue. ... The neck is the part of the body on many limbed vertebrates that distinguishes the head from the torso or trunk. ... A cervical vertebra Cervical vertebrae (Vertebrae cervicales) are the smallest of the true vertebrae, and can be readily distinguished from those of the thoracic or lumbar regions by the presence of a foramen (hole) in each transverse process. ... The human rib cage. ... The term spinal nerve generally refers to the mixed spinal nerve, which is formed from the dorsal and ventral roots that come out of the spinal cord. ... The neck is the part of the body on many limbed vertebrates that distinguishes the head from the torso or trunk. ...


The scalene muscles have an important relationship to other structures in the neck. The brachial plexus and subclavian artery pass between the anterior and middle scalenes. The subclavian vein passes arteriorly to the anterior scalene as it crosses over the first rib. The brachial plexus is an arrangement of nerve fibres (a plexus) running from the spine (vertebrae C5-T1), through the neck, the axilla (armpit region), and into the arm. ... The subclavian artery is a major artery of the upper thorax that mainly supplies blood to the head and arms. ... The subclavian vein is a continuation of the axillary vein and runs from the outer border of the first rib to the medial border of scalenus anterior muscle. ...

Muscles of the Head -- Neck -- Trunk -- Upper limb -- Lower limb -- LIST OF ALL MUSCLES

LATERAL CERVICAL: sternocleidomastoid | trapezius A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is a contractile form of tissue. ... This is a list of muscles of the human anatomy. ... In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ... In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a persons back. ...


SUPRAHYOID: stylohyoid | digastric | geniohyoid | mylohyoid The term suprahyoid refers to the region above (superior) to the hyoid bone in the neck. ... The Stylohyoid muscle is a slender muscle, lying in front of, and above the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. ... The digastric muscle (named digastric as it has two bellies) is a small muscle located under the jaw. ... The Geniohyoideus (Geniohyoid muscle) is a narrow muscle, situated above the medial border of the Mylohyoideus. ... The Mylohyoid muscle, flat and triangular, is situated immediately above the anterior belly of the Digastricus, and forms, with its fellow of the opposite side, a muscular floor for the cavity of the mouth. ...


INFRAHYOID: omohyoid | sternohyoid | sternothyroid | thyrohyoid The term infrahyoid refers to the region below(inferior) to the hyoid bone in the neck. ... The omohyoid muscle is a muscle at the front of the neck that consists of two bellies separated by an intermediate tendon. ...


VERTEBRAL -- ANTERIOR: longus capitis | longus colli | rectus capitis anterior | rectus capitis lateralis | LATERAL: scalenus anterior | scalenus medius | scalenus posterior The Longus capitis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Longus colli muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Rectus capitis lateralis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sternocleidomastoid muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (393 words)
In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid (pronounced /ˌstɚ.noˌkli.dəˈmæs.tɔɪ̯d/) muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head.
The lateral or clavicular head, composed of fleshy and aponeurotic fibers, arises from the superior border and anterior surface of the medial third of the clavicle; it is directed almost vertically upward.
The Supraclavicularis muscle arises from the manubrium behind the Sternocleidomastoideus and passes behind the Sternocleidomastoideus to the upper surface of the clavicle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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