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ALA Logo

The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. It is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 64,600 members. Founded in 1876 in Philadelphia and chartered in 1879 in Massachusetts, its head office is now in Chicago. Since 2002, Keith Michael Fiels has been the ALA executive director (CEO).[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Keith Michael Fiels Keith Michael Fiels (born 1949) is an American librarian. ...

ALA Seal

The stated mission of the ALA is "to provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all." ALA membership is open to any person or organization, though most of its members are libraries or librarians. As well, most members live and work in the United States, with international members comprising 3.5% of total membership.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ...


The ALA is governed by an elected council and an executive board. Policies and programs are administered by various committees and round tables. One of the organization's most visible tasks is overseen by the Office for Accreditation, which formally reviews and authorizes American and Canadian academic institutions that offer degree programs in library and information science. Library and information science (LIS) is the study of issues related to libraries and the information fields. ...


Members may join one or more of eleven membership divisions that deal with specialized topics such as academic, school, or public libraries, technical or reference services, and library administration. Members may also join any of seventeen round tables that are grouped around more specific interests and issues than the broader set of ALA divisions.


The ALA is affiliated with regional, state, and student chapters across the country. It also organizes conferences, participates in library standards development, and publishes a number of books and periodicals. The ALA annually confers numerous notable book and media awards, including the Caldecott Medal, the Newbery Medal, the Michael L. Printz Award and the Stonewall Book Award.[3] The Caldecott Medal was designed by Rene Paul Chambellan in 1937. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. ... Sponsored by the American Library Associations Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Round Table, The Stonewall Book Awards are the first and most enduring awards for GLBT books. ...


The ALA publishes the magazines American Libraries and Booklist. American Libraries is the official publication of the American Library Association. ... Booklist is the digital counterpart of the American Library Associations Booklist magazine that provides a critical review of books. ...

Contents

Political stances

The ALA advocates positions on United States political issues that it believes are related to libraries and librarianship. For court cases that touch on issues about which the organization holds positions, the ALA often files amici curiae briefs. The ALA has an office in Washington, D.C., that lobbies Congress on issues relating to libraries, information and communication. It also provides materials to libraries that may include information on how to apply for grants, how to comply with the law, and how to oppose a law.[4] Amicus curiae (plural amici curiae) is a legal Latin phrase, literally translated as friend of the court, that refers to a person or entity that is not a party to a case that volunteers to offer information on a point of law or some other aspect of the case to... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the political effort. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


Civil liberties, intellectual freedom, and privacy

The ALA maintains an Office for Intellectual Freedom, under the guidance of director Judith Krug. The Office promotes intellectual freedom, which the ALA defines as "the right of every individual to both seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction. It provides for free access to all expressions of ideas through which any and all sides of a question, cause or movement may be explored."[5] The primary documented expressions of the ALA's intellectual freedom principles are the Freedom to Read Statement[6] and the Library Bill of Rights. Judith F. Krug is a United States librarian. ... Intellectual Freedom is a human right. ... The Library Bill of Rights is the American Library Associations statement expressing the rights of library users to intellectual freedom and the expectations the association places on libraries to support those rights. ...


As a result of its stance on intellectual freedom, the ALA is generally opposed to any censorship of the material in libraries.[7] Interviewed about an attempt to remove a book from a suburban Boston middle school, Deborah Caldwell-Stone, deputy director of the ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom, said, "Our hope is that books are retained rather than removed. Ultimately, every challenge is an attempt to remove ideas from the discourse."[8] For other uses, see Censor. ...


In 1970, the ALA founded the first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization, called the "Task Force on Gay Liberation".[9][10] A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... A transgender person in New York Citys Gay Pride Parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English) ) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at...


In 1999, radio personality Laura Schlessinger campaigned publicly against the ALA's intellectual freedom policy, specifically in regard to the ALA's refusal to remove a link on its web site to an explicit sex-education site for teens.[11] Critics said, however, that Schlessinger "distorted and misrepresented the ALA stand to make it sound like the ALA was saying porno for 'children' is O.K."[12] Laura Catherine Schlessinger (born January 16, 1947) is an American cultural and conservative commentator, best known as host of the popular Dr. Laura radio advice call-in show. ...


In upholding its commitment to intellectual freedom, the ALA filed suit with library users and the ACLU against the United States Children's Internet Protection Act, which required libraries receiving federal E-rate discounts for Internet access to install a "technology protection measure" to prevent children from accessing "visual depictions that are obscene, child pornography, or harmful to minors." [13] At trial, the federal district court struck down the law as unconstitutional. [14] The government appealed this decision, and on June 23, 2003, the Supreme Court of the United States upheld the law as constitutional as a condition imposed on institutions in exchange for government funding. In upholding the law, the Supreme Court, adopting the interpretation urged by the U.S. Solicitor General at oral argument, made it clear that the constitutionality of CIPA would be upheld only "if, as the Government represents, a librarian will unblock filtered material or disable the Internet software filter without significant delay on an adult user's request."[15] The Childrens Internet Protection Act, also known as CIPA, is one of a number of bills that the United States Congress has proposed in an attempt to limit childrens exposure to pornography and other controversial material online. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym...


In 2003, the ALA passed a resolution opposing the USA PATRIOT Act, which called sections of the law "a present danger to the constitutional rights and privacy rights of library users".[16] Since then, the ALA and its members have sought to change the law by working with members of Congress and educating their communities and the press about the law's potential to violate the privacy rights of library users. ALA has also participated as an amicus curiae in lawsuits filed by individuals challenging the constitutionality of the USA PATRIOT Act, including a lawsuit filed by four Connecticut librarians after the library consortium they managed was served with a National Security Letter seeking information about library users. [17] After several months of litigation, the lawsuit was dismissed when the FBI decided to withdraw the National Security Letter.[18] The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law on October...


The ALA sells humorous "radical militant librarian" buttons for librarians to wear in support of the ALA's stances on intellectual freedom, privacy, and civil liberties.[19] Inspiration for the button’s design came from documents obtained from the FBI by the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. The request revealed a series of e-mails in which FBI agents complained about the "radical, militant librarians" while criticizing the reluctance of FBI management to use the secret warrants authorized under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act.[20] Electronic Privacy Information Center or EPIC is a public interest research group in Washington D.C.. It was established in 1994 to focus public attention on emerging civil liberties issues and to protect privacy, the First Amendment, and constitutional values. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with freedom of information legislation. ...


Copyright

The ALA says it "supports efforts to amend the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and to urge the courts to restore the balance in copyright law, ensure fair use and protect and extend the public domain".[21] It supports changing copyright law to release orphan works into the public domain; is wary of digital rights management; and, in ALA v. FCC, successfully sued the Federal Communications Commission to prevent regulation that would enforce next-generation digital televisions to contain rights-management hardware. It has joined the Information Access Alliance to promote open access to research.[22] The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ... Orphaned works are, broadly speaking, any copyrighted works where the rights holder is hard to find. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... The FCCs official seal. ...


Conferences

The ALA and its divisions hold numerous conferences throughout the year, of which the two ALA-wide ones are the ALA Annual Conference and the ALA Midwinter Meeting. Midwinter is typically more focused on internal organization business, while ALA Annual is focused around exhibits and presentations. The Annual conference is generally held in June, and Midwinter is typically held in January. ALA Annual is notable for being one of the largest professional conferences in existence, typically drawing over 25,000 attendees.[23] The 2006 Annual Conference was held in New Orleans; the association considered moving the conference to a new location after Hurricane Katrina struck, but conference organizers chose to continue plans for holding the conference in New Orleans to show support for the city. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Divisions

  • American Association of School Librarians (AASL)
  • Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS)
  • Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) [1]
  • Association for Library Trustees and Advocates (ALTA)
  • Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)
  • Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA)
  • Library Administration and Management Association (LAMA)
  • Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)
  • Public Library Association (PLA)
  • Reference and User Services Association (RUSA)
  • Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) is a division of the American Library Association. ... The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), established in 1957, is a division of the American Library Association. ...

Round tables

  • Round Tables generally
  • Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange (EMIERT)
  • Continuing Library Education Network and Exchange (CLENERT)
  • Federal and Armed Forces Libraries (FAFLRT)
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered (GLBTRT)
  • Government Documents (GODORT)
  • Intellectual Freedom (IFRT)
  • International Relations (IRRT)
  • Library History (LHRT)
  • Library Instruction (LIRT)
  • Library Research (LRRT)
  • Library Support Staff Interests (LSSIRT)
  • Map and Geography (MAGERT)
  • New Members (NMRT)
  • Social Responsibilities (SRRT)
  • Staff Organizations (SORT)
  • Video (VRT)

References

  1. ^ ALA (2002-04-22). Keith Michael Fiels named ALA's new Executive Director. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  2. ^ ALA International Member Survey. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  3. ^ Book/Media Awards. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  4. ^ Washington Office Issues. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  5. ^ Intellectual Freedom and Censorship Q & A. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  6. ^ Freedom to Read Statement.
  7. ^ Library Bill of Rights. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  8. ^ Kocian, Lisa (2006-11-12). 6th-grade book stirs rethinking. The Boston Globe. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  9. ^ ALA: Welcome to the GLBT Round Table. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  10. ^ Gittings, Barbara (1990). Gays in Library Land: The Gay and Lesbian Task Force of the American Library Association: The First Sixteen Years. 
  11. ^ "Dr. Laura" Continues Criticism of ALA. Library Journal. ALA (1999-05-10). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  12. ^ Presley, Sharon (Winter 2001). "Don't Listen to Dr. Laura". Free Inquiry 41 (1). Retrieved on 2007-03-08. 
  13. ^ Text of the Children's Internet Protection Act.
  14. ^ United States v. Am. Lib. Asso., 201 F.Supp.2d 401, 490 (2002)
  15. ^ US v ALA 539 U.S. 194, 2003. FindLaw. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  16. ^ Resolution on the USA PATRIOT Act and Related Measures that Infringe on the Rights of Library Users. ALA (2003-01-29). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  17. ^ Cowan, Alison Leigh. "Four Librarians Finally Break Silence in Records Case", The New York Times, 2006-05-31. Retrieved on 2007-02-07. 
  18. ^ FBI drops demand for information from Connecticut library group. Raw Story (2006-06-26). Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  19. ^ "Radical, Militant Librarian" Button. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  20. ^ ALA (2006-01-17). ALA introduces "Radical, Militant Librarian" button. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  21. ^ Nisbet, Miriam (October 2006). 2006 Copyright Agenda (PDF). ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  22. ^ Copyright Issues. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  23. ^ Conference Services. ALA. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.

For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

ANSEL, American National Standard for Extended Latin Alphabet Coded Character Set for Bibliographic Use, is a character set used in text encoding, and may also be known as ANSI/NISO Z39. ... Book Links is a magazine published by the American Library Association that helps teachers, librarians, school library media specialists, and parents connect children with high-quality books. ... Booklist is the digital counterpart of the American Library Associations Booklist magazine that provides a critical review of books. ... The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is a worldwide organization created to provide librarians around the world with a forum for exchanging ideas, and promoting international cooperation, research and development in all fields of library activity. ... The Library Bill of Rights is the American Library Associations statement expressing the rights of library users to intellectual freedom and the expectations the association places on libraries to support those rights. ...

External links

  • American Library Association
  • ALA Washington Office
  • ALA Office for Accreditation
  • Upcoming ALA conference schedule.
  • ALA Freedom to Read Statement
  • ALA Intellectual Freedom Q&A
  • ALA's "Resolution on the USA Patriot (sic) Act and Related Measures that Infringe on the Rights of Library Users"

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