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Encyclopedia > Savoy
Flag of Savoy
Flag of Savoy
This article is about the historical region of Savoy. For other uses, see Savoy (disambiguation)
For the two French départements of the region of Savoy, see Savoie and Haute-Savoie

Savoy (French: Savoie, pronounced /savwa/; Franco-Provençal: Savouè; Italian: Savoia) is a region of western Europe that emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, following the collapse of the Frankish Kingdom of Burgundy. Installed by Rudolph III, King of Burgundy, officially in 1003, the House of Savoy maintained independence as counts (see County of Savoy, ca 1000 to 1416) and then dukes (see Duchy of Savoy, 1416 to 1714), until Savoia was linked with the Kingdom of Sardinia, which included Piemonte in north-western Italy. Savoy was largely absorbed into France in 1860, as part of the political agreement with Napoleon III that brought about the unification of Italy. Image File history File links Savoie_flag. ... Image File history File links Savoie_flag. ... Other than the region / Duchy of Savoy, other things named Savoy include: A type of cabbage. ... Savoie is a French département located in the Alps. ... Haute-Savoie is a French département, named after the Alps mountain range. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Franco-Provençal (Francoprovençal) or Arpitan (in vernacular: patouès) (in Italian: francoprovenzale, provenzale alpina, arpitano, patois; French: francoprovençal, arpitan, patois) is a Romance language with several dialects in a linguistic sub-group separate from Langue dOïl and Langue dOc. ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... Look up Frank, frank in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coat of arms of the 2nd duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: Bourgogne) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks. ... Rudolf III of Burgundy, died September 6, 1032, King of Burgundy (993–1032). ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... The Counts of Savoy (Italian Savoia, French Savoie) emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, from the collapse of the Frankish Kingdom of Burgundy. ... For the earlier history of Savoy, see County of Savoy. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont, with Savoia upper left (pink) and Nizza (Nice) lower left (brown) both now French, and Sardinia in the inset The Kingdom of Sardinia is a former kingdom in Italy. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... Italian unification process. ...


In modern France, Savoy was part of the Rhône-Alpes region. Articles about the départements of created following annexation by France are to be found as Savoie and Haute-Savoie. The modern separatist / regionalist movements are discussed in the "Annexation and Opposition" section in this article. Location Administration Capital Lyon Regional President Jean-Jack Queyranne (PS) (since 2004) Départements Ain Ardèche Drôme Isère Loire Rhône Savoie Haute-Savoie Arrondissements 25 Cantons 335 Communes 2,879 Statistics Land area1 43,698 km² Population (Ranked 2nd)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Annexation (Latin ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the legal incorporation of some territory into another geo-political entity (either adjacent or non-contiguous). ... Savoie is a French département located in the Alps. ... Haute-Savoie is a French département, named after the Alps mountain range. ...


The traditional capital remains Chambéry (Chiamberì), on the rivers Leysse and Albane, hosting the castle of the House of Savoy and the Savoyard senate. The state included six districts: The city and arrondissement of Chambéry in Savoie, France, has been the historical capital of Savoy since the 13th century, when Amadeus V of Savoy made it his seat. ... Chambéry is a commune in Savoie, France. ... The Leysse seen from the Place de la Libération in Chambéry. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ...

Contents

Thonon-les-Bains is a French spa town on Lake Geneva. ... Faucigny was a region in Savoy containing the modern Haute Savoie département of France, including the communes of Chamonix, Argentiere, and Les Houches. ... // Geography - United States Bonneville Salt Flats is the name of an ancient lake bed in Utah. ... The Tarentaise Valley (French: Vallée de la Tarentaise) is a valley in the heart of the French Alps, in the Savoy region. ... Moûtiers is a commune of the Savoie département, in the Rhône-Alpes région, in France. ... Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne is a commune in the upper valley of the River Arc, and the capital and name of a canton and an arrondissement (formerly in the in the Départment of Haute Savoie) of the present Savoie département, in the southeastern Rhône-Alpes region of... Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne is a commune in the upper valley of the River Arc, and the capital and name of a canton and an arrondissement (formerly in the in the Départment of Haute Savoie) of the present Savoie département, in the southeastern Rhône-Alpes region of... The Genevois is a former province of the Duchy of Savoy. ... Pont des Amours à Annecy - Bridge of Love in Annecy The old jail La rue Carnot Annecy is a town in the Haute-Savoie region of eastern France, on the shores of Lake Annecy, 22 miles south of Geneva. ...

History

Map of Savoy in the 16th century, white lines are modern borders
Map of Savoy in the 16th century, white lines are modern borders

The name Savoy stems from the Celtic word Sapaudia, referring to a forest or woodland. It is first recorded in 354.[citation needed] Image File history File links Savoy2. ... Image File history File links Savoy2. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ...


In 1714, as a consequence of the War of the Spanish Succession, Savoy was technically subsumed into the Kingdom of Sicily, then (after that island was traded to Austria for Sardinia) the Kingdom of Sardinia from 1720. Charles II was the last Habsburg King of Spain. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... Sardinia (Sardegna in Italian, Sardigna or Sardinna in the Sardinian language), is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (Sicily is the largest), between Italy, Spain and Tunisia, south of Corsica. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont, with Savoia upper left (pink) and Nizza (Nice) lower left (brown) both now French, and Sardinia in the inset The Kingdom of Sardinia is a former kingdom in Italy. ...


French occupation

Savoy was occupied by France's revolutionary forces between 1792 and 1815. The region was first added to the département of Mont Blanc, then in 1798 was divided between the départements of Mont Blanc and Léman (French name of Lake Geneva.) This article is about the Alpine mountain. ... Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ...


On September 13, 1793 the combined forces of Savoy, Piedmont and Valdot fought the occupying French forces at the Battle of Méribel (Sallanches). September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Méribel took place at Méribel, France, on September 13, 1793, when the forces of the Duchy of Savoy fought the occupying French forces. ...


Annexation and opposition

Savoy was annexed by France on March 24, 1860 according to the provisions of the Treaty of Turin. The treaty was followed on April 22/23 by a plebiscite in which voters were offered the option of approving the treaty and joining France or rejecting the treaty; the disallowed options of either joining Switzerland (with which the region had close ties), remaining with Italy, or regaining its independence, were the source of some opposition. With a 99.8% vote in favour of joining France, there were also allegations of vote-rigging. March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in leap years). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Ballots of the Argentine plebiscite of 1984 on the border treaty with Chile A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ...


Some opposition to French rule was manifest when, in 1919, France officially (but contrary to the annexation treaty) ended the military neutrality of the parts of the region that had originally been agreed at the Congress of Vienna, and also eliminated the free trade zone - both treaty articles having been broken unofficially in World War I. The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held on the way to Vienna, Austria, from September 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... A free trade zone (FTZ) or export processing zone is one or more areas of a country where tariffs and quotas are eliminated and bureaucratic requirements are lowered in order to attract companies by raising the incentives for doing business there. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul...


For reasons such as these, there is currently a peaceful separatist movement in the départements, as well as a faction in favour of greater regional powers. Separatism is a term usually applied to describe the attitudes or motivations of those seeking independence or separation of their land or region from the country that governs them. ...


The Mouvement Région Savoie (Savoy Regional Movement) was founded in December 1971 as a 'movement' (rather than a traditional political party) in favour of regional autonomy. In the 1996 local elections the Savoie Regional Movement received 19,434 votes.


In the March 1998 regional elections, 1 seat (out of 23) was won by Patrice Abeille, leader of the Ligue Savoisienne (Savoie League, founded 1994) which two years earlier had set up a 'provisional Savoie government'. The League gathered a total of 17,865 votes across the two départements. In the same elections a further 4,849 voted in favour of the Savoie Movement.


As a result of the regional debate sparked by the political advances, the non-party organisation La Région Savoie, j’y crois ! (I believe in the Savoy Region!), was founded in 1998. The organisation campaigns for the replacement of the Savoie and Haute-Savoie départements with a regional government, separate from the Rhône-Alpes region, with greater devolved powers. According to surveys conducted in 2000, between 41% and 55% of the population are in favour of the proposal. 19% to 23% were in favour of separation from France. Location Administration Capital Lyon Regional President Jean-Jack Queyranne (PS) (since 2004) Départements Ain Ardèche Drôme Isère Loire Rhône Savoie Haute-Savoie Arrondissements 25 Cantons 335 Communes 2,879 Statistics Land area1 43,698 km² Population (Ranked 2nd)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... is divided into 26 régions, further subdivided into départements. ... For the heavy metal band, see Devolved (band) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ...


Since 2001, there have been no such activities.


See also

The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... This is a list of currently active autonomist and secessionist movements around the world. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Savoy (1475 words)
Savoy and involved the country in the wars between France and the emperors.
Savoy (a member of the Carignan branch of the family) at Turin in 1706 freed Piedmont from the enemy.
Savoy is in general the same as that of the Kingdom of Sardinia.
Savoy - definition of Savoy in Encyclopedia (737 words)
Savoy (Italian Savoia, French Savoie) is a region of western Europe that emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, from the collapse of the Frankish Kingdom of Burgundy.
Savoy was largely absorbed into France in 1860, as part of the political agreement with Napoleon III that brought about the unification of Italy.
The Mouvement Région Savoie (Savoie Regional Movement) was founded in December 1971 as a 'movement' (rather than a traditional political party) in favour or regional autonomy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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