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savings

In common usage, saving generally means putting money aside, for example, by putting money in the bank or investing in a pension plan. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In a broader sense, saving is typically used to refer to economizing, cutting costs, or to rescuing someone or something.


In terms of personal finance, saving refers to preserving money for future use - typically by putting it on deposit - this is distinct from investment where there is an element of risk. Personal finance is the application of the principles of finance to the monetary decisions of an individual or family unit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Invest redirects here. ...


Saving differs from savings in that the first refers to the act of putting aside mIn economics, personal saving has been defined as personal disposable income minus personal consumption expenditure. In other words, income that is not consumed by immediately buying goods and services is saved. Other kinds of saving can occur, as with corporate retained earnings (profits minus dividend and tax payments) and a government budget surplus. Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Disposable income is the total amount of income an individual makes after direct taxes. ... In economics, consumption refers to the final use of goods and services to provide utility. ...


There is some disagreement about what counts as saving. For example, the part of a person's income that is spent on mortgage loan repayments is not spent on present consumption and is therefore saving by the above definition, even though people do not always think of repaying a loan as saving. However, in the U.S. measurement of the numbers behind its gross national product (i.e., the National Income and Product Accounts), personal interest payments are not treated as "saving" unless the institutions and people who receive them save them. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Measures of national income and output are used in economics to estimate the value of goods and services produced in an economy. ... National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) use double entry accounting to report the monetary value and sources of output produced in a country and the distribution of incomes that production generates. ...


"Saving" differs from "savings." The former refers to an increase in one's assets, an increase in net worth, whereas the latter refers to one part of one's assets, usually deposits in savings accounts, or to all of one's assets. Saving refers to an activity occurring over time, a flow variable, whereas savings refers to something that exists at any one time, a stock variable. In economics, the distinction is often made between stock magnitudes and flow magnitudes. ...


Saving is closely related to investment. By not using income to buy consumer goods and services, it is possible for resources to instead be invested by being used to produce fixed capital, such as factories and machinery. Saving can therefore be vital to increase the amount of fixed capital available, which contributes to economic growth. Invest redirects here. ... Fixed capital is a concept in economics and accounting, first theoretically analysed in some depth by the economist David Ricardo. ... World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ...


However, increased saving does not always correspond to increased investment, if savings are stashed in a mattress or otherwise not deposited into a financial intermediary like a bank there is no chance for those savings to be recycled as investment by business. This means that saving may increase without increasing investment, possibly causing a short-fall of demand (a pile-up of inventories, a cut-back of production, employment, and income, and thus a recession) rather than to economic growth. (This is often called the "paradox of thrift.") In the short term, if saving falls below investment, it can lead to a growth of aggregate demand and an economic boom. In the long term if savings falls below investment it eventually reduces investment and detracts from future growth. Future growth is made possible by foregoing present consumption to increase investment. Invest redirects here. ... A recession is traditionally defined in macroeconomics as a decline in a countrys real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for two or more successive quarters of a year (equivalently, two consecutive quarters of negative real economic growth). ... The paradox of thrift is a paradox of economics propounded by John Maynard Keynes. ... In economics, aggregate demand is the total demand for goods and services in the economy (Y) during a specific time period. ...


In a primitive agricultural economy savings might take the form of holding back the best of the corn harvest as seed corn for the next planting season. If the whole crop were consumed the economy would deteriorate to hunting and gathering the next season.


Interest rates

Classical economics posited that interest rates would adjust to equate saving and investment, avoiding a pile-up of inventories (general overproduction). A rise in saving would cause a fall in interest rates, stimulating investment. But Keynes argued that neither saving nor investment were very responsive to interest rates (i.e., that both were interest inelastic) so that large interest rate changes were needed. Further, it was the demand for and supplies of stocks of money that determined interest rates in the short run. Thus, saving could exceed investment for significant amounts of time, causing a general glut and a recession. Classical economics is widely regarded as the first modern school of economic thought. ... An interest rate is the rental price of money. ... John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB (pronounced cains, IPA ) (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946) was a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on many governments fiscal policies. ... Various denominations of currency, one form of money Money is any good or token that functions as a medium of exchange that is socially and legally accepted in payment for goods and services and in settlement of debts. ... The General glut problem is a problem identified within the classical political economy of the era of Adam Smith and David Ricardo. ...


Saving in personal finance

Within personal finance the act of saving corresponds to nominal preservation of money for future use, although inflation can still erode its real value. A deposit account paying interest is typically used to hold money for future needs, i.e. an emergency fund, to make a capital purchase (car, house, vacation, etc.) or to give to someone else (children, tax bill etc.). Personal finance is the application of the principles of finance to the monetary decisions of an individual or family unit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Interest expense be merged into this article or section. ...


Savings within personal finance refers to the accumulated money put aside by saving.


Within personal finance, money used to purchase shares, put in a collective investment scheme or used to buy any asset where there is an element of capital risk is deemed an investment. This distinction is important as the investment risk can cause a capital loss when an investment is realised, unlike cash saving(s). Lower levels of risk normally apply to savings e.g. interest rates may fail to preserve its real value, or in extreme cases loss can occur due to bank failure. See stock (disambiguation) for other meanings of the term stock A stock, also referred to as a share, is commonly a share of ownership in a corporation. ... Funds financial information A collective investment scheme is a way of investing money with a large number of people to participate in a wider range of investments that may not be feasible for an individual investor hence many investors share the costs of doing so. ... Invest redirects here. ... On ground of assurance of the return, there are two kinds of Investments - Riskless and Risky. ... “Banker” redirects here. ...


In many instances the term saving and investment are used interchangeably which confuses this distinction. For example many deposit accounts are labeled as investment accounts by banks for marketing purposes. To help establish whether an asset is saving(s) or an investment you should ask yourself, "where is my money invested?" If the answer is cash then it is savings, if it is a type of asset which can fluctuate in nominal value then it is investment. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Interest rates

The real interest rate is the rate after tax is deducted less the rate of inflation. In some instances the real rate can be negative - this is known as inflation risk.


See also

oney for future use, whereas the second refers to the money itself once saved. Invest redirects here. ... Financial literacy is the ability of individuals to make appropriate decisions in managing their personal finances. ... Value investing is a style of investment strategy from the so-called Graham & Dodd School. ... Index investing, also called indexing, is a method of passive investing whereby a fund (or individual) buys the same stocks in the same proportions as in a target index. ... Growth investing is a style of investment strategy. ... Socially responsible investing describes an investment strategy which combines the intentions to maximize both financial return and social good. ... Appreciation is a term used in accounting relating to the increase in value of an asset. ... Most generally, the accumulation of capital refers simply to the gathering or amassment of objects of value; the increase in wealth; or the creation of wealth. ... Financial economics is the branch of economics concerned with resource allocation over time. ... An investor profile or style defines an investors preferences in money decisions, for example: Short term trading or Long term holding (buy and hold Risk averse or risk tolerant / seeker All classes of assets or just one (stocks for example) Value or growth stocks, big cap or small cap... Investor relations is a set of activities which relate to the ways in which a company discloses information required for regulatory compliance and good investment judgment to bond and/or shareholders and the wider financial markets. ... In finance, the return on investment (ROI) or just return is a calculation used to determine whether a proposed investment is wise, and how well it will repay the investor. ... Speculation involves the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, bonds, commodities, currencies, collectibles, real estate, derivatives or any valuable financial instrument to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income via methods such as dividends or interest. ... A Stock Trader or Stock Investor is a securities professional or firm, who buys and sells securities, such as stocks and bonds. ... Stoozing is the common name given in the UK to the act of borrowing money at 0% (typically on credit cards) and earning interest on the money and paying it back before the 0% period ends. ...

  • For example: you may decide to start saving 10% of your income; because you aim for your savings to grow into an amount sufficient to buy a car.

== Saving in economics == This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Saving, by Laurence J. Kotlikoff: The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics: Library of Economics and Liberty (2675 words)
Some of the factors that undoubtedly affect the amount people save are culture, differences in saving motives, economic growth, demographics, how many people in the economy are in the labor force, the insurability of risks, and economic policy.
Another issue related to motives and preferences for saving is the role of the rich in generating aggregate saving.
One possible explanation for the recent decline in saving is a reduction in saving for bequests, which may tie in with the decline in the birthrate.
Saving (money) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (961 words)
Saving refers to an activity occurring over time, a flow variable, whereas savings refers to something that exists at any one time, a stock variable.
Saving can therefore be vital to increase the amount of fixed capital available, which contributes to economic growth.
However, increased saving does not always correspond to increased investment, if savings are stashed in a mattress or otherwise not deposited into a financial intermediary like a bank there is no chance for those savings to be recycled as investment by business.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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