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Encyclopedia > Save The Last Dance For Me

"Save the Last Dance for Me" was a song by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, that was recorded in 1960 by the band The Drifters, who took it to #1 on the U.S. pop charts. Emmylou Harris and Dolly Parton also each recorded versions of the song (Harris in 1979 and Parton in 1984); both singers' recordings reached the top ten on the U.S. country singles charts. Michael BublĂ© has also brought his version to #99 on the U.S. charts. In the song, the narrator tells his lover she is free to mingle and socialize throughout the evening, but to make sure to save him one dance at the end of the night. The song is the story of a war veteran who had lost his legs and was telling his spouse (who loved to dance) that she is ok to have fun however she should not forget who she is going home with. Doc Pomus (January 27, 1925 - March 14, 1991) was an American blues singer and songwriter, active throughout the 20th century. ... Mort Shuman (November 12, 1936 _ November 2, 1991) was an American singer and songwriter. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... The Drifters were a long-lived American doo wop/R&B band, originally formed by Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward & the Dominoes) in 1953. ... Emmylou Harris, ca. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American country singer, songwriter, composer, author and actress. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Bublé Michael Bublé (born 9 September 1975 in Burnaby, British Columbia) is a Canadian crooner, pop jazz singer and actor. ...


In the UK, the Drifters' version reached #2 in December 1960.


This song was played in the first season finale of Queer as Folk, in which Brian Kinney dances with Justin Taylor at his senior prom. // Queer As Folk (US) Based on the British series of the same name, Showtimes Queer as Folk presents the American version. ... Gale Harold as Brian Kinney Brian Kinney is a fictional character from Showtimes Queer as Folk (US TV series) television show. ... Justin Taylor is a gay fictional character on the American television series Queer as Folk (US TV series), played by Randy Harrison. ... Senior Prom is a still-classified U.S. Air Force program to develop a stealth unmanned aerial reconnaisance vehicle (and possibly as a cruise missile), designed to be launched from a DC-130, B-52, or B-1. ...


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