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Encyclopedia > Savannah State University
Savannah State University
Image:SSU logo.jpg

Motto: "Lux Et Veritas"
(Latin: Light and Truth)
Established 1890 [1] details
Type: Public, Land-grant, state, co-ed, HBCU
Endowment: $2,433,508 [4]
President: Dr. Earl G. Yarbrough Sr. [2]
Staff: 385
Undergraduates: 3,200
Postgraduates: 93 [3]
Location Savannah, Georgia, USA Flag of the United States
Campus: 175 acres, coastal setting [5]
Colors: Burnt Orange and Reflex Blue
          
Nickname: Tigers
Athletics: Division I
Affiliations: Independent
Website: www.savstate.edu

Savannah State University is a four-year, state-supported, historically black university located in Savannah, Georgia. Savannah State holds the distinction as the oldest public historically black university in Georgia.[6] Savannah State is also a member school of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Savannah State University is a four-year, state-supported, historically black university located in Savannah, Georgia. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... A state university system in the United States is a group of universities supported by an individual state or a similar entity such as the District of Columbia. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. Earl Glenn Yarbrough Sr. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... See also Orange (disambiguation) for other meanings of the word. ... Blue (from Old High German blao shining) is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength (about 470 nm) of the three primary colors. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Savannah redirects here. ... In the United States, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) (a type of Minority Serving Institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African-American community. ... Thurgood Marshall successfully argued the 1954 landmark case Brown v. ...

Contents

Mission

Savannah State University's mission is "to graduate students who are prepared to perform at higher levels of economic productivity, social responsibility, and excellence in their chosen career fields of endeavor in a changing global community."[8]


History

SSU's History at a glance
1890 Established as Georgia State Industrial College for Colored Youth [9]
1891 Relocated from Athens, Georgia to Savannah, Georgia [10]
1921 First female students admitted as campus residents. [11][1]
1928 College became a full four-year degree-granting institution as high school and normal programs removed. [11][1]
1932 Renamed to Georgia State College [11][1]
1947 Land-grant designation transferred to Fort Valley State College). [1]
1950 Renamed to Savannah State College [1]
1996 Renamed to Savannah State University [8]

Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Savannah redirects here. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... Fort Valley State University (FVSU) is a historically black college and university (HBCU) located in Fort Valley, Georgia. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Establishment

Savannah State University was originally founded as a result of the Second Morrill Land Grant Act of August 30, 1890,[8] The act had specific wording which mandated that southern and border states develop of Black land grant colleges. On November 26, 1890 the Georgia General Assembly passed enabling legislation creating the Georgia State Industrial College for Colored Youth. [9] The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site...


A preliminary session of the school was held in the Baxter Street School Building in Athens, Georgia where Richard R. Wright Sr. was principal. [11] The college operated in Athens for several months in 1891 before moving to its permanent location in Savannah on October 7, 1891, with Wright as the first president. [10] The school had five faculty members, and eight students who were all graduates of Edmund Asa Ware High School, the first public high school for blacks in Augusta, Georgia.[11] For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Richard Nathaniel Wright (September 4, 1908 – November 28, 1960) was an American author of novels, short stories and non-fiction. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ...


Early years

The first baccalaureate degree was awarded in 1898. [1] In 1921 the first female students were admitted as residents on the campus. [11][1] The college became a full four-year degree-granting institution in 1928 with the removal of the high school and normal programs. [11][1] The school became a full member institution of the University System of Georgia in 1932 and the name was changed to Georgia State College. [11][1] The college served as Georgia’s land-grant institution for African-American students until 1947 when the designation was transferred to Fort Valley State College). [1] In January 1950 the name was again changed, this time to Savannah State College. [1] The University System of Georgia (USG) is the organizational body that includes all public institutions of higher learning in Georgia. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... Fort Valley State University (FVSU) is a historically black college and university (HBCU) located in Fort Valley, Georgia. ...


Modern history

In 1996 the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia elevated Savannah State College, to the status of state university and the name was changed to Savannah State University. [8] The Georgia Board of Regents was created in 1931 and is part of the states government. ...


Savannah State University is the first institution in the state of Georgia to offer the homeland security degree program and the second institution in the University System of Georgia to offer wireless Internet connectivity to students throughout the campus.[6][12]


Campus

Savannah State University is located approximately 5 miles (8 km) east southeast from the center of Savannah, Georgia, 250 miles (402 km) from Atlanta, Georgia, and 120 miles (193 km) from Jacksonville, Florida. [13] The campus is accessible from Interstate 95 and Interstate 16. [14] Spanish moss drapes the dense live oak trees, while palm trees, magnolias, and a wide variety of azaleas, camellias, and other native plants are scattered throughout the 175-acre (708,199.9 m²) marsh-side campus at 32°1′20.76″N, 81°3′18.44″W (32.0224339, -81.0551121)GR4 [15] Adapted from Wikipedias GA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... “Jacksonville” redirects here. ... Interstate 95, the main Interstate Highway on the east coast of the United States, serves the Atlantic coast of Georgia. ... Interstate 16 (abbreviated I-16), or Georgia State Route 404, is an intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of Georgia, United States. ... Binomial name (L.) L. Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) closely resembles its namesake (Usnea, or beard lichen). ... Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae or Palmae (also known by the name Palmaceae, which is taxonomically invalid. ... This article is about the plant. ... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ... Species About 100–250 species, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euphlebia Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia hongkongensis - Hong Kong Camellia Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ...

Adams Hall, named for A. Pratt Adams was built in 1931 under the administration of Dr. Benjamin Hubert, the third President of the College (1926-1947). Image courtesy the Dixie News Co., Savannah, Ga. from the Historic Postcard Collection, RG 48-2-5, Georgia Archives.
Adams Hall, named for A. Pratt Adams was built in 1931 under the administration of Dr. Benjamin Hubert, the third President of the College (1926-1947). Image courtesy the Dixie News Co., Savannah, Ga. from the Historic Postcard Collection, RG 48-2-5, Georgia Archives.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Early years

The original campus consisted of 86 acres (348,030 m²) and three buildings (Boggs Hall, Parsons Hall and a farmhouse) with 51 acres (206,390 m²) of the land serving as the school's farm.[16] Several of the campus' older buildings were originally constructed by students and faculty members, and display architectural styles from the past century.[17]


Historic facilities

Walter Bernard Hill Hall, built in 1901, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.[18] The Georgia Historical Commission and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources have recognized both the Savannah State campus and Hill Hall as a part of the Georgia Historical Marker Program.[19] A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Planned improvements

On October 15, 2007 (2007-10-15) Savannah State broke ground on a new academic building. [20] Planned student facilities in the building include 10 classrooms, three lecture rooms, three computer labs, and an applied research and observation labs. [21] The building will also house the Africana studies exhibit, the Dean of Humanities and faculty offices, the Public Administration/Urban Studies and the Social Work and Social and Behavioral Sciences departments. [21] The currently unnamed building is scheduled to open in 2009. [21] is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Notable campus events

Portions of the Paramount Pictures movie The General's Daughter were filmed at historic Hill Hall on the campus during the summer of 1997. The film’s director Simon West was quoted as saying the campus and Savannah generally “had the most varied and interesting look” to represent the “brooding,” “hot and steamy and sticky” “Southern Gothic” impression.[5] The Generals Daughter is a 1999 film starring John Travolta. ...



The TLC show Trading Spaces filmed an episode (entitled: Savannah: SSU Steppers) on the campus on September 7-9, 2007 as two spaces in the King-Frazier Student Center were transformed by members of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. The episode premiered on Nov. 17, 2007. [22] TLC is a cable TV network in the US and Canada, that carries a variety of informational and reality-based programming. ... Trading Spaces is an hour-long television reality program on the cable channel The Learning Channel. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ...


Academic profile

Schools and colleges

The university operates three colleges and the Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research (OGSSR).[8]

  • College of Business Administration
  • College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
  • College of Sciences and Technology
  • Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research

The College of Business Administration offers the Bachelor of Business Administration degree with concentrations in Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Management, and Marketing. ... The College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences offers Bachelor of Arts Degrees with concentrations in Africana studies, English language and literature (religious and pilosophical studies or foreign Language), history, or mass communication (print and online journalism, public relations and advertising, and radio and television) and the Bachelor of Fine... The College of Sciences and Technology offers the Masters of Science degree with a concentration in Marine Science and Bachelor of Science degrees with concentrations in civil engineering technology, computer science technology, electronics engineering technology, biology, chemistry, environmental studies, marine science, mathematics. ... The Office of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research coordinates the universitys instructional, research and service programs. ...

Research centers

The university operates four research centers.[8]

  • Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support
  • Savannah Entrepreneurial Center - The College of Business Administration operates the Savannah Entrepreneurial Center for the city of Savannah and offers technical assistance and training for starting, maintaining or expanding small business operations.[23]
  • The Midtown Project - The university has worked closely with the City of Savannah via The Midtown Project, Savannah State University's partnership with neighborhood associations to develop strategies to rebuild their communities.[23]
  • The CIRE ("A Collaboration to Integrate Research and Education in Marine and Environmental Science and Biotechnology") program collaborates with the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography to operate a teaching laboratory on the campus providing "hands-on" research experience to undergraduate marine science students.

The Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) is an autonomous research unit of the University System of Georgia. ...

Areas of Study

Students at Savannah State University may choose from 23 accredited undergraduate baccalaureate and 5 graduate master’s degree programs offered through the colleges of Business Administration, Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, and Sciences and Technology.


Program accreditation

Accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Savannah State University also offers specialized accreditations in Civil Engineering Technology (Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology), Electronics Engineering Technology (Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and National Association of Radio and Telecommunications Engineers, Inc. (NARTE)), Mechanical Engineering Technology (Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology), Bachelor and Masters in Social Work (Council on Social Work Education), and MPA (National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. The College of Business Administration is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International[8] and the Mass Communications Department is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC).[24] Additionally, the Chemistry department is American Chemical Society (ACS) certified.[25] The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) is the national association for social work education in the United States of America. ... The National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) is a Washington, D.C. non-profit organization that exists to: >Ensure excellence in education and training for public service >Promote the ideal of public service >Accredit master degrees in public administration, including Master of Public Administration (MPA) and... AACSB International--The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), founded in 1916, has granted specialized business school accreditation to more than 500 degree-granting institutions in 30 countries. ... The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a learned society (professional association) based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. ...


Other academic programs

The university's Marine Biology Department operates two research vessels: the R/V Sea Otter (a 35-ft twin diesel vessel owned by NOAA) and the R/V Tiger (a 22-ft outboard work boat).[26] In the fall of 2007 Savannah State teamed with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to offer a new course in environmental regulations. [27] The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ...



Savannah State University's College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences and the Office of Student Affairs administer an HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention and awareness program which is funded by a grant from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, and administered by McFarland and Associates of Washington, D.C. [28] The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ...


Student life

The University offers organized and informal co-curricular activities including 75 student organizations, leadership workshops, 15 intramural activities, student publications and student internships.[29]


The SSU Wesleyan Gospel Choir

the SSU Wesleyan Gospel Choir was established in 1971. [30]


In 2004 the choir completed and released a live album, entitled RLW: "Revelation, Love, & Worship". [31]


Members of the Wesleyan Gospel Choir participated in the NBCAHF Inaugural Gospel Explosion competition in 2006 and the International Gospel Retreat which aired on the The Word Network.[30] In 2007 the choir performed at the Dr. Bobby Jones International Gospel Music Industry Retreat which was also broadcast on the The Word Network. The Word Network is a small urban religious network in the United States. ... The Word Network is a small urban religious network in the United States. ...


The choir performed with Ann Nesby during the 13th annual Savannah Black Heritage Festival. [32] Nesby on the cover of her new album In The Spirit released April 18, 2006 Ann Bennett Nesby is an American R&B, gospel, and dance music singer from Joliet, Illinois who started out as the lead vocalist for Sounds Of Blackness. ...


Marching Tiger band

The university band, nicknamed the Marching Tigers, performs during Savannah State football games and were featured performers in the Honda Battle of the Bands in 2004 and 2005. The Honda Battle of the Bands (sometimes abbreviated Honda or HBOB) is an annual marching band exhibition which features performances by HBCU bands. ...


National fraternities and sororities

All nine of the National Pan-Hellenic Council organizations currently have chapters at Savannah State University.[33][34] These organizations are: The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ...

Organization Symbol Chapter Chapter Symbol
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. ΑΚA Gamma Upsilon ΓΥ
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. ΑΦΑ Delta Eta ΔΗ
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. ΔΣΘ Delta Nu ΔΝ
Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc. IΦΘ
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. ΚΑΨ Gamma Chi ΓΧ
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. ΩΨΦ Alpha Gamma ΑΓ
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. ΦΒΣ Gamma Zeta ΓΖ
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. ΣΓΡ Alpha Iota ΑΙ
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. ΖΦΒ Rho Beta ΡΒ

Other National fraternities and sororities with registered chapters currently on campus include: Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ...

Organization Symbol Chapter Chapter Symbol
Delta Sigma Pi Business Fraternity ΔΣΠ Kappa Chi ΚΧ
Iota Phi Lambda Business Sorority ΙΦΛ
Phi Beta Lambda Business Fraternity ΦΒΛ
Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity ΦΑΔ
Tau Beta Sigma National Honorary Band Sorority ΤΒΣ Iota Zeta ΙΖ
Kappa Kappa Psi National Honorary Band Fraternity KKΨ Lambda Upsilon ΛΥ
Delta Phi Omega Band Fraternity ΔΦΩ

Additionally, Alpha Phi Omega (ΑΦΩ) National Fraternity, at one point, had a registered chapter at Savannah State. ΔΣΠ (Delta Sigma Pi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity in the United States of America. ... Phi Beta Lambda is the college branch of The Future Business Leaders of America organization. ... ΦAΔ (Phi Alpha Delta), or PAD, is the largest co-ed professional law fraternity in the United States of America. ... Tau Beta Sigma is a co-educational national honorary band sorority dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Kappa Kappa Psi is a national honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ...


Student media

The Tiger's Roar

The Tiger's Roar is the official student-produced newspaper of Savannah State University and provides both a print and on-line version.[35] The Tiger’s Roar is the official student newspaper of the Savannah State University in Savannah, Georgia and has referred to itself as the independent student voice of Savannah State University. As of the Spring semester of 2007, the Tiger’s Roar has a bi-weekly print and on-line... Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ...


WHCJ (College Radio Station)

Main article: WHCJ

SSU operates WHCJ (FM) radio, which broadcasts 24 hours a day from the campus, covers all of Chatham County, and can also be heard in Effingham, Bryan, Beaufort, and Liberty counties.[36] WHCJ is a campus radio station, operated by Savannah State University, broadcasts 24 hours a day from the campus. ... WHCJ is a campus radio station, operated by Savannah State University, broadcasts 24 hours a day from the campus. ... Chatham County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Effingham County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Bryan County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Liberty County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ...


Established in 1975 and known as "the Voice of Savannah State University", WHCJ's current play formats include gospel, jazz, reggae, blues and salsa music, as well as talk shows, commentaries, and cultural enrichment programming.[37]


Notable faculty and staff

  • Horace Broadnax - Broadnax is the current head men's basketball coach and was a member of the 1984 NCAA Division-I Men’s National Championship Team. [38]
  • Russell Ellington - As Savannah State College’s men's head basketball Ellington compiled a 148-91 record (.619 winning percentage), the most wins by a men's basketball coach in the school's history.
  • Charles J. Elmore (1967) - Former SSU professor and department chair and author of An Historical Guide to Laurel Grove Cemetery South, a book on SSU’s Richard R. Wright, and The Athletic Saga of Savannah State College. Elmore’s last publication is All That Savannah Jazz published in 1999.
  • Francys Johnson - NAACP Southeast Region Director and former member of the Savannah State Social Sciences faculty.
  • The Honorable Otis Johnson - Former faculty member and the current mayor of Savannah, Georgia.[39]
  • E. J. Josey - American activist and librarian who served as an instructor of Social Sciences and History (1954-1955).
  • Mohamed Haji Mukhtar - Professor of African & Middle Eastern History and noted author on the history and sociology of Somalia and Islam.

Horace Broadnax is the head mens basketball coach at Savannah State University. ... Russell Ellington (d. ... Dr. Charles J. Elmore is a Black scholar and jazz historian. ... The Reverend Dr. Francys Johnson a native of Sylvania, Georgia. ... Savannah redirects here. ... E.J. Josey E. J. Josey is an American activist and librarian. ... Mohamed Haji Mukhtar (Ph. ...

Presidents of Savannah State University

Main article: President of Savannah State University

There have been twelve presidents in the history of Savannah State University. The current president is Dr. Earl G. Yarbrough Sr. who became president on May 30, 2007.[2] The President of Savannah State University is the chief operating officer of the university. ... Dr. Earl Glenn Yarbrough Sr. ...


Notable alumni

CDR Donnie Cochran at the dedication ceremony for the A4 Memorial on the Campus of Savannah State University on May 10, 1991. Photo courtesy of Savannah State University, NROTC.
CDR Donnie Cochran at the dedication ceremony for the A4 Memorial on the Campus of Savannah State University on May 10, 1991. Photo courtesy of Savannah State University, NROTC.

See also Savannah State University alumni. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Name Class year Notability Reference
Donnie Cochran 1976 Retired U.S. Navy Captain who completed two tours with the United States Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels [40]
Curtis Cooper Notable Savannah-area civil rights leader.
Bobby Curtis NFL football player
Walter E. Gaskin 1971 Major General, U.S. Marine Corps - In June 2006, Gaskin became the commanding general of Marine Corps Second Division, making him the senior ranking active-duty African-American Marine and first African-American to command a Marine Corps division [41]
Troy Hambrick National Football League running back [42]
Matt "Showbiz" Jackson 1983 Current member of the Harlem Globetrotters [43]
Jessie Kenlaw 1975 assistant coach with the WNBA Seattle Storm [44]
George E. Kent professor of literature (with a specialism in Afro-American literature)
W. W. Law 1948 A nationally-known civil rights leader and preservationist
Ernest "The Cat" Miller former professional wrestler [45]
Jerome Miller 1974 Toyota Motor Sales Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion - Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. [46]
The Honorable Barbara J. Mobley 1969 A member of the DeKalb County Georgia State Court bench (the first African-American woman to be elected to that post) and a former member of the Georgia House of Representatives [47][48]
Tahj Mowry former child actor from the sitcom "Smart Guy", played football at SSU for 1 season
Shannon Sharpe A three-time Super Bowl champion, and NFL’s all-time leader in receptions (815) and yards (10,060) by a tight end. He is number 2 on the NFL's all-time TD receptions by a tight end list (62) behind Tony Gonzalez. [49][50]
JaQuitta Williams 1993 Anchor/Reporter for WSB-TV, ABC affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia [51]

Captain Donnie L. Cochran was the first Black aviator assigned to the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron (Blue Angels) in 1986. ... USN redirects here. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... The United States Navys Blue Angels (or Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron), formed in 1946, is the worlds first officially sanctioned military aerial demonstration team. ... Curtis V. Cooper was a civil rights leader, who was born and raised in Savannah, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Bobby Curtis (disambiguation). ... Major General Walter E. Gaskin is the current Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruiting Command. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Troy Hambrick (born November 6, 1976 in Lacoochee, Florida) is a running back in the National Football League who currently is a free agent. ... NFL redirects here. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... For the soccer team of the same name, see Seattle Storm (soccer). ... George E. Kent (1920–82) was an African-American professor of literature, with a specialism in Afro-American literature. ... Westley Wallace Law (January 1, 1923 – July 29, 2002) was a civil rights leader from Savannah, Georgia. ... For other persons named Ernest Miller, see Ernest Miller (disambiguation). ... This article is about the automaker. ... Tahj Dayton Mowry (born May 17, 1986) is an American actor. ... Smart Guy was an American sitcom that aired on The WB for three seasons from 1997 to 1999. ... Shannon Sharpe (born June 26, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former AFC tight end and wide receiver who played 12 of his 14 seasons with the Denver Broncos in the NFL. Sharpe is known most for his creative commentary and trash talking as well as for being the premier... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Tony Gonzalez (born February 27, 1976 in Torrance, California) is an American football tight end who has played his entire NFL career for the Kansas City Chiefs. ... WSB-TV is the ABC affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... Atlanta redirects here. ...

Athletics

Savannah State Tigers
University Savannah State University
Conference NCAA Independents
NCAA
Athletics director Paula Jackson (interim athletic director)
Location Savannah, GA
Varsity teams 13
Football stadium Ted A. Wright Stadium
Basketball arena Tiger Arena
Mascot
Nickname Tigers or Lady Tigers
Fight song
Colors Burnt Orange and Blue

              Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NCAA Division one (D1) Independents are a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) schools that do not belong to a Basketball Conference. ... Savannah Savannah is a city located in Chatham County, Georgia. ... Official language(s) English Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Largest metro area Atlanta metro area Area  Ranked 24th  - Total 59,411 sq mi (154,077 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 2. ... Ted Wright Stadium is a 7,500-seat multi-purpose stadium in Savannah, Georgia. ... Tiger Arena is a 6,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Savannah, Georgia. ...

Homepage www.savstate.edu/athletics/
Main article: Savannah State Tigers

Savannah State University holds membership in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I (as an independent) and participates in the following sports: football, baseball, basketball (men and women), cross-country (men and women), tennis (men and women), track and field (men and women), volleyball (women only), golf (men), and softball (women).[52] The Tigers is the name used for all of the mens intercollegiate athletic teams that play for Savannah State University in Savannah, Georgia. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... College baseball is baseball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... College softball is softball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ...


School colors

The official school colors for Savannah State are Burnt Orange and Reflex Blue.[53] White is often used as a secondary color and for alternate jerseys. School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... See also Orange (disambiguation) for other meanings of the word. ... Blue (from Old High German blao shining) is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength (about 470 nm) of the three primary colors. ... This article is about the color. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


School mascot

The Tigers is the name used for all of the men's intercollegiate athletic teams that play for Savannah State University in Savannah, Georgia. The female intercollegiate teams are known as the Lady Tigers. [53] Savannah redirects here. ...


Organization

Athletics at Savannah State University are administered by the Savannah State University Athletic Department. The department dedicates about $2 million per year for its sports teams and facilities. [54] Paula Jackson was announced as interim athletic director on October 4, 2007, replacing Robert "Tony" O'Neal who had been the athletic director since 2005. [55][56] blah blah Modern athletic directors are often in a coaching misconduct being proven, often the athletic director will be terminated along with the offending coach. ...


Athletic facilities

  • Tiger Arena - The 6,000-seat multi-purpose arena is the home for the university's basketball team and athletic department offices.
  • Ted A. Wright Football Stadium – Home of the Savannah State I-AA (Independent) Football team and the Olympic outdoor track. The 7,500-seat multi-purpose stadium opened in 1967. The track was constructed in 1995.[57]
  • Memorial Stadium, Savannah - A 15,000-capacity, county owned, multi-use stadium near Savannah, Georgia (officially located in Isle of Hope, Georgia). The stadium occasionally hosts homecoming festivities for the university.

Tiger Arena is a 6,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Savannah, Georgia. ... Ted Wright Stadium is a 7,500-seat multi-purpose stadium in Savannah, Georgia. ... Memorial Stadium is a 15,000-capacity county owned multi-use stadium near Savannah, Georgia (officially located in Isle of Hope, Georgia). ...

Savannah State University in the news

Winless Basketball season

The school gained notoriety when they finished the 2004-2005 men's basketball season a winless 0-28, the first Division I team to do so since Prairie View A&M University in 1991-1992.[58][59] The team’s final game (a 49-44 loss to Florida A&M) was covered by several national sports organizations including ESPN. Prairie View A&M University is a historically black university located in Prairie View, Texas and is a member of the Texas A&M University System. ... Name Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Address Town Tallahassee, FL 32307 Established 1887 Community Type Public coeducational Classification Historically black Agricultural and mechanical Religion Secular Enrollment Faculty President Dr. Castell V. Bryant Accreditation Nickname Rattlers Mascot Rattler Colors Orange and light green Motto Head, heart, hand, field Newspaper The Famuan... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ...


Savannah State University vs. Commissioned II Love

Commissioned II Love, an evangelical Christian campus group, with the assistance of The Alliance Defense Fund's Center for Academic Freedom and the National Legal Foundation filed a federal discrimination lawsuit against Savannah State University and several university employees on March 1, 2007.[60][61] Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... Civil action redirects here. ... The Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) is a conservative Christian non-profit organization with the stated goal of defending the right to hear and speak the Truth through strategy, training, funding, and litigation. ...


The student group was recognized as an official organization in 2003 but was later suspended (April 10, 2006) and then expelled on September 11, 2006 after some students complained to university police that its members engaged in activities such as "foot washings" and "baptisms."[60][61] At the time the university categorized such activities as hazing.[60] Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


On August 24, 2007, a federal judge denied the school’s motion to have the case dismissed.[60]


Suggested reading

  • Elmore, Charles J. Richard R. Wright, Sr., at GSIC, 1891-1921: A Protean Force for the Social Uplift and Higher Education of Black Americans (Savannah, Ga.: privately printed, 1996).
  • Elmore, Charles Savannah, Georgia (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub., 2002).
  • Hall, Clyde W. One Hundred Years of Educating at Savannah State College, 1890-1990 (East Peoria, Ill.: Versa Press, 1991).

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Savannah State University. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  2. ^ a b Earl G. Yarbrough Sr., Ph.D President Savannah State University. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  3. ^ Savannah State University Keyfacts. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  4. ^ USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2008: Savannah State University: At a glance. U.S. News.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  5. ^ a b Savannah General Information. Savannah State University Office of Institutional Research & Planning (2003). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  6. ^ a b Savannah State University Admission: About Us. Savannah State University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  7. ^ Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund Member Schools. Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Savannah State University 2005-2007 Catalog. Savannah State University (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  9. ^ a b SSU - Where Savannah Meets the Sea.... Retrieved on 2008-08-31.
  10. ^ a b Savannah State University was founded in 1890, <http://www.umes.edu/lmrcsc/ssu%20overview.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-08-27
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h New Georgia Encyclopedia: Savannah State University. Retrieved on 2007-08-30.
  12. ^ Savannah State to offer Bachelor of Arts degree in homeland security and emergency management. Savannah State University (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  13. ^ Savannah State University Location. Savannah State University (2003). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  14. ^ Savannah General Information. Savannah State University Office of Institutional Research & Planning (2003). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  15. ^ Geographic Names Information System Feature Detail Report. U.S. Department of the Interior (U.S. Geological Survey). Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  16. ^ Historic Thunderbolt, Georgia. Armstrong Atlantic State University Department of History. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  17. ^ Savannah General Information. Savannah State University Office of Institutional Research & Planning (2003). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  18. ^ National Register of Historic Places. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  19. ^ Georgia Historical Markers. University of Georgia Carl Vinson Institute of Government (2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  20. ^ SSU Breaks Ground on New Academic Building. WTOC TV (2007-10-15). Retrieved on 2007-11-30.
  21. ^ a b c Academic Building (2007-11-29). Retrieved on 2007-11-30.
  22. ^ TV Listing:Trading Spaces (2007-11-16). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  23. ^ a b Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  24. ^ SSU’s mass communications program accredited by ACEJMC. Savannah State University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-27.
  25. ^ SSU’s chemistry department. Savannah State University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  26. ^ Marine Sciences Program, Savannah State University. National Association of Marine Laboratories (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  27. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers teams with Savannah State to offer new course in environmental regulations. Savannah State University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-27.
  28. ^ SSU receives $65,000 grant for HIV/AIDS and Substance Abuse prevention education program (2006-01-16). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  29. ^ Savannah State University Campus Life. Savannah State University (2002). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  30. ^ a b SSU students compete, earn titles during National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame Weekend (2006-10-01). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  31. ^ Wesleyan Gospel Choir launches CD project (2004-09-27). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  32. ^ THE ACADEMIC CONNECTION: Black Heritage Festival. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  33. ^ SSU Greek Organizations. Savannah State University (1998). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  34. ^ Hall, Willie. "SSU welcomes Iota Phi Theta to the yard", Tiger's Roar, 2007-02-02. Retrieved on 2007-04-04. (English) 
  35. ^ General Information. The Tiger's Roar (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  36. ^ Savannah State University WHCJ 90.3 FM. Savannah State University (2000). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  37. ^ Savannah State University WHCJ 90.3 FM History and Background. Savannah State University (2000). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  38. ^ Savannah State University Head Men’s Basketball Coach Horace Broadnax. Savannah State University. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  39. ^ City of Savannah. City of Savannah (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  40. ^ From SSU to the Blue Angels. Savannah State University (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  41. ^ Official Biography for Walter E. Gaskin. United States Marine Corps (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  42. ^ NFL Players: Troy Hambrick. NFL.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  43. ^ Player Bio. Harlem Globetrotters (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  44. ^ Coach Bio. WNBA (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  45. ^ The early days of WCW star Ernest Miller. SLAM! Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-11-12.
  46. ^ Toyota Motor Sales Appoints New Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion. Hispanic PR Wire (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  47. ^ Representative Barbara J. Mobley. Georgia House of Representatives (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  48. ^ Representative Barbara J. Mobley. Georgia House of Representatives (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  49. ^ NFL.com Writers: Shannon Sharpe. NFL.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  50. ^ Gonzalez gets record, win. The Examiner (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-15.
  51. ^ JaQuitta Williams: News Reporter and Anchor. WSBTV (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  52. ^ Savannah State University Athletics. Savannah State University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  53. ^ a b Savannah State University Athletics. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  54. ^ "The Mid-majority Report: Savannah State. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  55. ^ Savannah State AD Resigns (2007-10-04). Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  56. ^ Savannah State University Athletics Director - Robert “Tony” O’Neal. Savannah State University. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  57. ^ DIAAFOOTBALL.COM Savannah State. Bisonville.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  58. ^ "Tigers finish season 0-28", ESPN.com, 2005-05-28. Retrieved on 2005-02-15. 
  59. ^ Winless Savannah State Gets New Coach. CSTV.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  60. ^ a b c d Evangelical group sues college over foot-washing. Biloxi Sun Herald (2007-09-06). Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  61. ^ a b Court Rules in Favor of Christian 'Foot Washing' Group (2007-08-29). Retrieved on 2007-09-26.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University System of Georgia (USG) is the organizational body that includes all public institutions of higher learning in Georgia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CANOE (acronym for Canadian Online Explorer, commonly called Canoe. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Savannah State University is at coordinates 32°01′21″N 81°03′18″W / 32.0224339, -81.0551121Coordinates: 32°01′21″N 81°03′18″W / 32.0224339, -81.0551121

 
 

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