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Encyclopedia > Sauvignon blanc
Sauvignon blanc
Ripe Sauvignon blanc grapes
Species: Vitis vinifera
Also called: Sauvignon Jaune, Blanc Fume (France), Muskat-Silvaner (Germany & Austria), Fume Blanc
Origin: Flag of France France
Notable regions: New Zealand, California, Loire Valley, Bordeaux
Notable wines: Sauternes
Hazards: Powdery mildew, Oidium, Black rot, and Botrytis cinerea,

Sauvignon blanc is a green-skinned grape variety which originates from the Bordeaux region of France. The grape gets it name from the French word sauvage ("wild") and blanc ("white") due to its early origins as an indigenous grape in western France. [1] It is now planted in many of the world's wine regions, producing a crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wine. Conversely, the grape is also a component of the famous dessert wines from Sauternes and Barsac. Sauvignon blanc is widely cultivated in France, New Zealand and California.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 363 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Binomial name Vitis vinifera L. For thousands of years, the fruit and plant of Vitis vinifera, the European grapevine, have been harvested for both medicinal and nutritional value; its history is intimately entwined with the history of wine. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This list of wine-producing regions catalogues significant growing regions where vineyards are planted. ... Sauternes is a commune of the Gironde département in France. ... Powdery mildew Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that affects a wide range of plants. ... This article is about a type of fungal spore. ... Black rot is the most serious disease of crucifer crops world wide when environmental conditions are favorable. ... Binomial name Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetzel 1945 Botrytis cinerea is a fungus that affects many plant species, although its most economically important hosts are wine grapes[]. In viticulture, it is commonly known as botrytis bunch rot; in horticulture, it is usually called grey mould or gray mold. ... It has been suggested that Veraison be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wine Country is a region of Northern California in the United States, known as a wine-growing region since 1838. ... Varietal describes wines made from a single named grape variety. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Dessert wines are those wines which are typically served with dessert, although they are also drunk on their own, i. ... Sauternes is a commune of the Gironde département in France. ... Barsac is a town and commune on the left bank of the Garonne river in the Gironde département in south-west France. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Depending on climate, the flavor can range from aggressively grassy to sweetly tropical. Wine experts often use the phrase "cat's pee on a gooseberry bush" as a favorable description of Sauvignon blanc from the Loire Valley and New Zealand.[3][4] Sauvignon blanc, when slightly chilled, pairs well with fish or cheese, particularly Chevre. It is also known as one of the few wines that can pair well with sushi.[5] Binomial name L. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ribes uva-crispa See Physalis peruviana for the tomato-like fruit commonly known as the Cape gooseberry and kiwifruit for the fruit sometimes known as the Chinese gooseberry. ... Loire Valley (French: Vallée de la Loire) is known as the Garden of France and the Cradle of the French Language. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Goats Cheese Chèvre cheese is cheese made from goats milk (chèvre is French for goat). ... Many types of sushi ready to be eaten. ...


Along with Riesling, Sauvignon blanc was one of the first fine wines to be bottled with a screwcap in commercial quantities, especially by New Zealand producers. The wine is usually consumed young, as it does not particularly benefit from aging. Dry and sweet white Bordeaux, typically made with Sauvignon blanc as a major component, is the one exception. Riesling is a white grape variety and varietal appellation of wines grown historically in Germany (see German wine), Alsace (France), Austria, and northern Italy. ... A screwcap is a type of closure that is gaining increasing support as an alternative to cork for sealing wine bottles. ... Bordeaux with sub-wine regions A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. ...

Contents

History

The Sauvignon blanc grape traces its origins to western France in the Loire Valley and Bordeaux Regions. At some point in the 18th century, the vine paired with Cabernet Franc to parent the Cabernet Sauvignon vine in Bordeaux. In the 19th century, plantings in Bordeaux were often interspersed with Sauvignon vert (In Chile, known as Sauvignoasse) as well as the Sauvignon blanc pink mutation Sauvignon gris. Prior to the phylloxera epidemic, the insect plague which devastated French vineyards in the 19th century, these interspersed cuttings were transported to Chile where the field blends are still common today. Despite the similarity in names, Sauvignon blanc has no known relation to the Sauvignon Rosé mutation found in the Loire Valley of France.[6] Loire Valley (French: Vallée de la Loire) is known as the Garden of France and the Cradle of the French Language. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cabernet Franc is a red wine grape variety similar to and a parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. ... Old vine Cabernet Sauvignon at Chateau Montelena in Napa Valley. ... Muscadelle is a white wine grape. ... Muscadelle is a white wine grape. ... Sauvignon gris is pink color wine grape that is a clonal mutation of Sauvignon blanc. ... Grape Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, family Phylloxeridae, superfamily Aphidoidea) is a serious pest of commercial grapevines worldwide, originally native to eastern North America. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Monura - extinct Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (may be paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Diaphanopterodea - extinct Protodonata - extinct Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Caloneurodea - extinct Titanoptera - extinct Protorthoptera - extinct Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera... wine grapes Viticulture (from the Latin word for vine) is the science, production and study of grapes which deals with the series of events that occur in the vineyard. ... Loire Valley (French: Vallée de la Loire) is known as the Garden of France and the Cradle of the French Language. ...


The first cuttings of Sauvignon blanc were brought to California by Charles Wetmore, founder of Cresta Blanca winery, in the 1880s.[7] These cuttings came from the Sauternes vineyards of Chateau d'Yquem. The plantings produced well in Livermore Valley. Eventually, the wine acquired the alias of "Fumé Blanc" in California by promotion of Robert Mondavi. The grape was first introduced to New Zealand in the 1970s as an experimental planting to blended with Müller-Thurgau.[8] Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A half bottle of Sauternes from Château dYquem Sauternes is a type of dessert wine made from Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle grapes that have been affected by Botrytis cinerea, also known as noble rot. ... Château dYquem is a Grand Premier Cru ( French, Great First Growth or Great First Vintage) wine from the Sauternes region in the southern part of Bordeaux. ... Livermore Valley, is a valley in California, USA, surrounding a city of the same name, Livermore. ... Robert Gerald Mondavi (born June 18, 1913 in Virginia, Minnesota, United States) is a leading vineyard operator whose technical improvements and marketing strategies brought worldwide recognition for the wines of the Napa Valley in California. ... Müller-Thurgau is a variety of white grape (sp. ...


Climate and geography

Vineyards in Sancerre will often plant roses around Sauvignon blanc vines as an early detector of powdery mildew.

The Sauvignon blanc vine often buds late but ripens early, which allows it to performs well in sunny climates when not exposed to overwhelming heat. In warm regions such as South Africa, Australia and California, the grape flourishes in cooler climate appellations such as the Alexander Valley area.[6] In areas where the vine is subjected to high heat, the grape will quickly become over-ripe and produce wines with dull flavors and flat acidity. Global warming has had an effect on the Sauvignon blanc grape, with the rising global temperatures causing farmers to harvest the grapes earlier then they have in the past.[9] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 507 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 507 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Species Between 100 and 150, see list A rose is a flowering shrub of the genus Rosa, and the flower of this shrub. ... Powdery mildew Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that affects a wide range of plants. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... An appellation in its broadest sense is a name or designation. ... The Alexander Valley is a beautiful valley located just North of Healdsburg, California in the Sonoma County. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... Look up Harvest in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The grape originated in France, in the regions of Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. Plantings in California, Australia, Chile and South Africa are also extensive, and Sauvignon Blanc is steadily increasing in popularity as white wine drinkers seek alternatives to Chardonnay. The grape can also be found in Italy and Eastern Europe.[2] Oak-aged Chardonnay is particularly popular in the United States. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ...

A glass of Sauternes.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License v. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License v. ...

France

In France, Sauvignon blanc is grown in the maritime climate of Bordeaux and Sauternes as well as the continental climate of the Loire Valley (as Pouilly Fumé, Sancerre, and Sauvignon de Touraine). The climates of these areas are particularly favorable in slowing the ripening on the vine, allowing the grape more time to develop a balance between its acidity and sugar levels. This balance is important in the development of the intensity of the wine's aromas. Winemakers in France pay careful attention to the terroir characteristics of the soil and the different elements that it can impart to the wine. The chalk and Kimmeridgean marl of Sancerre and Pouilly produces wines of richness and complexity while areas with more compact chalk soils produces wines with more finesse and perfume. The gravel soil found near the Loire River and its tributaries impart spicy and floral flavors. Vines planted in flint tend to produce the most vigorous and longest lasting wines. [9] An oceanic climate (also called marine west coast climate and maritime climate) is the climate typically found along the west coasts at the middle latitudes of all the worlds continents, and in southeastern Australia; similar climates are also found at high elevations within the tropics. ... Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... Pouilly Fumé has an unusual flavor for a dry white wine: a strong flavor of musk and smoked. ... Sancerre is one of the most famous white wines in France named from the town Sancerre. ... The Touraine is a former province of France. ... A winemaker is a person engaged in the occupation of making wine. ... Terroir was originally a French term in wine and coffee appreciation used to denote the special characteristics of geography that bestowed individuality upon the food product. ... The Needles,situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ... Marls are calcium carbonate or lime rich muds or mudstones which contain variable amounts of clays and calcite or aragonite. ... Gravel (largest fragment in this photo is about 4 cm) Gravel is rock that is of a certain particle size range. ... The Loire River (pronounced in French), the longest river in France with a length of just over 1000 km, drains an area of 117,000 km², more than a fifth of France. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ...


Pouilly Fumé originate from the town of Pouilly-sur-Loire, located directly across the Loire River from the commune of Sancerre. The soil here is very flinty with deposits of limestone which the locals believed imparted a smoky, gun flint flavor to the wine and hence Fumé, the French word for "smoke" was attached to the wine. [10] Along with Sémillon, Muscadelle and Ugni blanc, Sauvignon blanc is one of only four white grapes allowed in the production of white Bordeaux wine. Mostly used as a blending grape, Sauvignon blanc is the principle grape in Château Pétrus' Pavillon Blanc, [11]In the northern Rhône Valley, Sauvignon blanc is often blended with Tresallier to form a tart white wine. [12] Sancerre is a town and commune of the Cher département, in central France. ... -1... Muscadelle is a white wine grape. ... Trebbiano is a white grape used to make white wine, and the most common white grape variety in Italy, accounting for around a third of all Italys white wine. ... Bordeaux with sub-wine regions A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. ... Pétrus is a wine of the Pomerol wine region in Bordeaux. ... The Rhône wine region is first divided into north and south. ... Sacy is a white wine grape grown primarily in the northeast of France within the Yonne department. ...


In the Sauternes region, the grape is blended with Sémillon to make the late harvest wine, Sauternes. The composition of Sauvignon blanc varies from producer and can range from 5-50% with the Premier Cru Supérieur Château d'Yquem using 20%. A traditional practice often employed in Sauternes is to plant one Sauvignon blanc vine at regular intervals among rows of Semillon. However, Sauvignon blanc's propensity to ripen 1-2 weeks earlier can lead the grapes to lose some of their intensity and aroma as they hang longer on the vine. This has prompted more producers to isolate their parcels of Sauvignon blanc. [13] Late harvest is a term applied to wines made from grapes left on the vine longer than usual. ...


Near the edge of the Chablis commune is an area known as Sauvignon de St.-Bris that is gaining attention for its Sauvignon blanc production. [14] The Chablis wine region is the northernmost sector of Burgundy, France, and also the name of a town located there. ...


New Zealand and Australia

Jackson Estate Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand.
Jackson Estate Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand.

In the 1990s, Sauvignon blanc wines from the maritime climatic regions of New Zealand, particularly the South Island, became popular on the wine market. In the Marlborough region, sandy soils over slate shingles have become the most desirable locations for plantings due to the good drainage of the soil and poor fertility that encourages the vine to concentrate its flavors in lower yields. In the flood plain of the Wairau River Valley, the soil runs in east-west bands across the area. This can create a wide diversity of flavors for vineyards that are planted north-south with the heavier soils producing more herbaceous wines from grapes that ripen late and vines planted in stonier soils ripening earlier and imparting more lush and tropical flavors. It is this difference in soils, and the types of harvest time decisions that wine producers must make, that add a unique element to New Zealand Sauvignon blanc. [9] The long narrow geography of the South Island, ensures that no vineyard is more than 80 miles from the coast. The cool, maritime climate of the area allows for a long and steady growing season in which the grapes can ripen and develop a natural balance of acids and sugars. This brings out the flavors and intensity that New Zealand Sauvignon blancs are noted for. [15]. More recently, regions in the North Island, such as Martinborough, Gisborne and Hawkes Bay, have been attracting attention for their Sauvignon Blanc releases, which often exhibit subtle differences to those from Marlborough (Air New Zealand Wine Awards 2000-2006) The asparagus, gooseberry and green flavor commonly associated with New Zealand Sauvignon blanc is derived from flavor compounds known as methoxypyrazines that becomes more pronounced and concentrated in wines from cooler climate regions.[16]. Riper flavors such as passion fruit, along with other notes such as boxwood, may be driven by thiol concentrations [17]. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 244 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (326 × 800 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 244 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (326 × 800 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Marlborough is one of the regions of New Zealand, located in the northeast of the South Island. ... The South Island The South Island is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the more populous North Island. ... Marlborough on a Wednesday Market morning The town-centre of Marlborough Marlborough (pronounced Maulbruh - /ˈmɔːlbɹə/ in IPA) is a market town in the English county of Wiltshire on the Old Bath Road, the old main road from London to Bath. ... Slate Slate Macro Slate roof Slate is a fine-grained, homogeneous, metamorphic rock derived from an original shale-type sedimentary rock composed of clay or volcanic ash through low grade regional metamorphism. ... The Wairau River is one of the longer rivers in New Zealands South Island. ... Chemical structure of isopropyl methoxy pyrazine (IPMP) Methoxypyrazines are a class of chemical compounds that produce odors. ... Sulphydryl // In organic chemistry, a thiol is a compound that contains the functional group composed of a sulfur atom and a hydrogen atom (-SH). ...


In Australia, particularly the Margaret River region, the grape is often blended with Sémillon. Varietal styles, made from only the Sauvignon blanc grape, from Adelaide Hills and Padthaway have a style distinctive from their New Zealand neighbors that tend to be more riper in flavor with white peach and lime notes and slightly higher acidity.[8] Rivermouth, Margaret River Location of Margaret River // Geography Margaret River is a town and river in Western Australia. ... Sémillon is a golden-skinned grape used to make dry and sweet white wines, most notably in France and Australia. ... Varietal describes wines made from a single named grape variety. ... The Waterfall Gully waterfall in the Adelaide Foothills The Adelaide Hills are part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, east of the city of Adelaide in the state of South Australia. ... Padthaway (36°36′S 140°29′E, population 218) is a town on the Riddoch Highway in the south-east of South Australia, halfway from Keith to Naracoorte. ...


North America

In North America, California is the leading producer of Sauvignon blanc with plantings also found in Washington State and on the Niagara Peninsula and Okanagan Valley in Canada. In California wine produced from the Sauvignon blanc grape is also known as Fumé blanc. This California wine was first made by Napa Valley's Robert Mondavi Winery in 1968. Mondavi had been offered a crop of particularly good Sauvignon blanc grapes by a grower. At that time the variety had a poor reputation in California due to its grassy flavor and aggressive aromas. Mondavi decided to try to tame that aggressiveness with barrel agings and released the wine under the name Fumé blanc as an allusion to the French Pouilly-Fumé.[13] The usage of the term is primarily a marketing base one with California wine makers choosing which ever name they prefer. Both oaked and unoaked Sauvignon blanc wines have been marketed under the name Fumé blanc. [18] California Sauvignon blancs tend to fall into two styles. The New Zealand influenced-Sauvignon blanc have more tropical fruit undertones with citrus and passion fruit notes. The Mondavi-influenced Fumé Blanc are more rounder with melon notes.[8] Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Map of Southern Ontario showing Niagara Peninsula in red The Niagara Peninsula is the portion of Ontario, Canada lying on the south shore of Lake Ontario. ... The regional districts that comprise the Okanagan are shown in red. ... California wine has a long and continuing history, and in recent decades has become recognized producing some of the worlds finest wine, matching the produce of the classic winemaking regions of France and, in some wine competitions, such as the historic Paris Wine Tasting of 1976, surpassing it. ... Napa County is in north-central California Napa Valley is most famous for its wine. ... Robert Gerald Mondavi (born June 18, 1913 in Virginia, Minnesota, United States) is a leading vineyard operator whose technical improvements and marketing strategies brought worldwide recognition for the wines of the Napa Valley in California. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Veraison be merged into this article or section. ... Whiskey barrels at the Jack Daniels distillery Barrels for aging wine in Napa Valley An aging barrel is a barrel used to age wine or distilled spirits such as whiskey, brandy, or rum. ... Pouilly Fumé has an unusual flavor for a dry white wine: a strong flavor of musk and smoked. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


South America

In the early 1990s, ampelographers began to distinguish Sauvignon blanc from Sauvignonasse plantings in Chile. The character of non-blended Chilean Sauvignon blanc are noticeably less acidic then the wines of New Zealand and more similar to the French style that is typical of Chilean wines. The region of Valparaíso is the most notable area for Sauvignon blanc in Chile due to its cooler climate which allows the grapes to be picked up to six weeks later then in other parts of Chile. In Brazil, ampelographers have discovered that the vines called Sauvignon blanc planted in the region are really Seyval Blanc.[8] Ampelography (Αμπελος, vine + γραφος, writing) is the field of botany concerned with the identification and classification of grapevines, Vitis spp. ... Chile has a long history of wine making, going back to the conquistadores who brought grape vines with them in the mid 16th Century and planted vineyards. ... Valparaíso is Chiles fifth administrative region from north to south. ... Seyval Blanc (aka Seyve-villard 5276) is a hybrid wine grape variety used to make white wines. ...


Other areas

Sauvignon blanc is also beginning to gain prominence in areas like South Africa's Stellenbosch and Italy's Collio areas. [14] Stellenbosch from Botmaskop mountain looking towards Cape Town Stellenbosch (IPA: ) is the second oldest European settlement in the Western Cape Province, South Africa after Cape Town, and is situated about 50 kilometers (30 mi) away along the banks of the Eerste River. ... Collio is a town and comune in the province of Brescia, in Lombardy. ...


Viticulture

Sauvignon blanc vineyards in Marlborough, New Zealand, demonstrating restrictive pruning practices.

Winemakers in New Zealand and Chile harvest the grapes at various intervals for the different blending characteristics that the grape can impart depending on its ripeness levels. At its most unripe stage, the grape is high in malic acid. As it progresses further towards ripeness the grape develops red & green pepper flavors and eventually achieves a balance of sugars.[9] Grapes grown in Marlborough's Wairau Valley may exhibit different levels of ripeness over the vineyard, caused by slight unevenness in the land and giving a similar flavor profile to the resulting wine. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The term vintner is applied to wine merchants as well as winemakers. ... Malic acid is a tart-tasting organic acid that plays a role in many sour or tart foods. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ...


Sauvignon blanc can be greatly influenced by decisions in the winemaking process. One decision is the amount of contact that the must has with the skins of the grape. In the early years of the New Zealand wine industry, there were no wineries on the South Island which meant that freshly harvested grapes had to be trucked and then ferried to the North Island, often all the way up to Auckland. This allowed for prolonged exposure of the skins and juice which sharpened the intensity and pungency of the wine. Some winemakers, like the Loire, intentionally leave a small amount of must to spend some time in contact with the skin for later blending purposes. Other winemakers, like in California, generally avoid any contact with the skin due to the reduce aging ability of the resulting wine. [19] Winemakers often use carboys like these to ferment smaller quantities of wine Winemaking, or vinification, is the process of wine production, from the selection of grapes to the bottling of finished wine. ... For must meaning compulsion, see wikt:must. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ...


Another important decision is the temperature of fermentation. French winemakers prefer warmer fermentations (around 16-18°C) that bring out the mineral flavors in the wine while New World winemakers prefer slightly colder temperatures to bring out more fruit and tropical flavors. A small minority of Loire winemakers will put the wine through malolactic fermentation, a practice more often associated with New Zealand wines.[19] Oak aging can have a pronounced effect on the wine, with the oak rounding out the flavors and softening the naturally high acidity of the grape. Some winemakers, like those in New Zealand and Sancerre, prefer stainless steel fermentation tanks over barrels with the intention of maintaining the sharp focus and flavor intensity. [20] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Fermentation (biochemistry). ... New World wines are those wines produced outside the traditional wine-growing areas of Europe and North Africa. ... Malolactic fermentation is a process of fermentation where tart malic acid is converted to softer-tasting lactic acid. ...


See also

A selection of New Zealand wines New Zealand wine is largely produced in ten major wine growing regions spanning latitudes 36° to 45° South and extending 1,600 km (1,000 miles). ... In the United States wine is produced commercially in all fifty states, although the majority of wine is produced in California. ... The Australian wine industry is the fourth largest in the world, [1] exporting over 400,000,000 litres a year to a large international export market that includes old world wine-producing countries such as France, Italy and Germany. ... French gastronomy France is one of the oldest wine producing regions of Europe. ... Italian wines are those produced in Italy, the oldest wine producing region, and are considered to be among the most prestigious wines in the world. ... It has been suggested that Veraison be merged into this article or section. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 52 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  2. ^ a b Epicurious, "Sauvignon Blanc"
  3. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 268 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  4. ^ Materman, "Stuff of legends: Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc."
  5. ^ Robert Joseph and Margaret Rand, KISS Guide to Wine DK Pub 2000 ISBN 0-7894-5981-7
  6. ^ a b Oz Clarke Encyclopedia of Grapes pg 221 Harcourt Books 2001 ISBN 0151007144
  7. ^ Wine Pros Sauvignon blanc
  8. ^ a b c d Oz Clarke Encyclopedia of Grapes pg 225 Harcourt Books 2001 ISBN 0151007144
  9. ^ a b c d Oz Clarke Encyclopedia of Grapes pg 222 Harcourt Books 2001 ISBN 0151007144
  10. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 272 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  11. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 123 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  12. ^ J. Robinson Vines, Grapes & Wines pg 120 Mitchell Beazley 1986 ISBN 1857329996
  13. ^ a b J. Robinson Vines, Grapes & Wines pg 124 Mitchell Beazley 1986 ISBN 1857329996
  14. ^ a b M. Kramer Saved by Sauvignon The Wine Spectator pg 36 July 31st, 2007
  15. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 807 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  16. ^ Marais, J., Hunter, J.J., & Haasbroek, P.D. (1999). Effect of microclimate, season and region on Sauvignon blanc grape composition and wine quality. South African Journal of Enology and Viticulture, 20, 19-30.
  17. ^ Tominaga, T., Baltenweck-Guyot, R., Peyrot des Gachons, C., & Dubourdieu, D. (2000). Contribution of volatile thiols to the aromas of white wines made from several Vitis vinifera grape varieties. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, 51, 178-181.
  18. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 647 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  19. ^ a b Oz Clarke Encyclopedia of Grapes pg 223 Harcourt Books 2001 ISBN 0151007144
  20. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 811 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345

Further reading

  • LAROUSSE Encyclopedia of WINE, Hamlyn, 2001, ISBN 0-600-60475-6
  • Taber, G. Judgment of Paris. New York: Scribner's, 2005.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sauvignon blanc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (216 words)
Sauvignon blanc is a white wine grape probably originating in the Bordeaux region of France that is now planted in much of the world's winelands producing a crisp dry refreshing white varietal wine.
In California until the 1970s it was usually made as a nondescript semi-sweet wine until Robert Mondavi made a dry varietal he named Fumé Blanc (a reference to Pouilly Fumé) which became so successful that the name Fumé Blanc is now recognised as a legal synonym for Sauvignon Blanc in the US.
Dry and sweet white Bordeaux, typically made with Sauvignon blanc as a major component, is the one exception.
Sauvignon Blanc (156 words)
The Sauvignon Blanc grape produces wines of distinction in most of the areas where it is grown.
Sauvignon Blancs are higher in acid and often exhibit 'melon' in the nose and tastes.
Sauvignon Blanc produces large crops and is a low cost variety.
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