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Encyclopedia > Satsuma Province


Satsuma (薩摩国; -no Kuni) was an old province of Japan that is now the western half of Kagoshima prefecture on the island of Kyushu. Its abbreviation is Sasshū (薩州). Image File history File links Japan_prov_map_satsuma. ... Before the modern prefecture system was established, the land of Japan was divided into tens of Kuni (国, Countries). ... Kagoshima Prefecture (鹿児島県 Kagoshima-ken) is located on Kyushu island, Japan. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ...


During the Sengoku period, Satsuma was a fief of the Shimazu daimyo, who ruled much of southern Kyushu from their castle at Kagoshima city. The Sengoku Period (戦国時代 Sengoku jidai) or warring-states period, is a period of long civil war in the History of Japan that spans through the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries. ... Grave of Satsuma clan at Mount Koya. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Kagoshima (鹿児島市; -shi) the capital city of Kagoshima Prefecture at the southwest tip of the Kyushu island of Japan. ...


In 1871, with the abolition of feudal domains and the establishment of prefectures after the Meiji Restoration, the provinces of Satsuma and Osumi were combined to eventually establish Kagoshima prefecture. 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Occurring in 1871, the abolition of the han system and establishment of the prefecture system (廃藩置県, haihan-chiken; hai abolish + han + chi set down + ken prefecture) was an act to replace the traditional han system and introduce new local government. ... The term prefecture has been used to denote a self-governing body or area since the time of Constantine I, who divided the Roman Empire into 4 districts (each divided into dioceses). ... The Meiji Restoration (明治維新; Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ...


Satsuma was one of the main provinces that rose in opposition to the Tokugawa shogunate in the mid 19th century. Because of this, the oligarchy that came into power after the "Meiji Restoration" of 1868 had a strong representation from the Satsuma province, with leaders such as Okubo Toshimichi and Saigo Takamori taking up key government positions. The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oligarchy is a Political regime where most political power effectively rests with a small segment of society (typically the most powerful, whether by wealth, military strength, ruthlessness, or political influence). ... The Meiji Restoration (明治維新; Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Ōkubo Toshimichi (大久保 利通 Ōkubo Toshimichi, 10 August 1830 - 14 May 1878), Japanese statesman, a samurai of Satsuma, is one of the five great nobles who led the revolution in 1868 against the shogunate. ... Saigō Takamori (西郷 隆盛 Saigō Takamori, 23 January 1827/28 - 24 September 1877), one of the most influential samurai in Japanese history, lived during the late Edo Period and early Meiji Era. ...


satusma is well-known for its yam production.


See also



The Satsuma Clan was a samurai clan which inhabited the Satsuma province of Japans Kyushu island. ...

Former provinces of Japan

Aki | Awa(Kanto) | Awa(Shikoku) | Awaji | Bingo | Bitchu | Bizen | Bungo | Buzen | Chikugo | Chikuzen | Chishima | Dewa | Echigo | Echizen | Etchu | Harima | Hida | Higo | Hitachi | Hidaka | Hizen | Hoki | Hyuga | Iburi | Iga | Iki | Inaba | Ise | Ishikari | Iwami | Iyo | Izu | Izumi | Izumo | Kaga | Kai | Kawachi | Kazusa | Kii | Kitami | Kozuke | Kushiro | Mikawa | Mimasaka | Mino | Musashi | Mutsu | Nagato | Nemuro | Noto | Oki | Omi | Oshima | Osumi | Owari | Sado | Sagami | Sanuki | Satsuma | Settsu | Shima | Shimosa | Shimotsuke | Shinano | Shiribeshi | Suo | Suruga | Tajima | Tamba | Tango | Teshio | Tokachi | Tosa | Totomi | Tsushima | Wakasa | Yamashiro | Yamato Before the modern prefecture system was established, the land of Japan was divided into tens of kuni (国, countries). ... Aki (安芸国; -no kuni) was an old province in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, comprising the western part of what is today Hiroshima prefecture, Japan. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Bungo (豊後国; Bungo no kuni) was an old province of Japan in eastern Kyushu, which bordered on Buzen, Hyuga, Higo, Chikugo, and Chikuzen provinces. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Chikuzen (筑前国; Chikuzen no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area that is today part of Fukuoka Prefecture on Kyushu, but without the southern and eastern parts of Fukuoka. ... Chishima (千島国, -no kuni) was a province of Japan created during the Meiji Era. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Echizen (越前国; -no kuni) was an old province of Japan, which is today the northern part of Fukui prefecture. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Hidaka (日高国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaido. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Iburi (胆振国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaido. ... Iga Province (伊賀国; -no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area that is today western Mie prefecture. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Japan | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Old provinces of Japan | Japan geography stubs ... Ishikari (石狩国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaido. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Izumo (出雲国; Izumo no kuni) was an old province of Japan which today consists of the eastern part of Shimane prefecture in the Chugoku region. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Kai province (甲斐国; -no kuni) is an old province in Japan that corresponds to Yamanashi prefecture today. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Kitami (北見国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaido. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Kushiro (釧路国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province in Hokkaido. ... Mikawa (三河国, Mikawa no kuni) is an old province in the area that today forms the eastern half of Aichi Prefecture. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Nagato (Ja. ... Nemuro (根室国, -no kuni) was an old province in Japan in what is today Nemuro Subprefecture, Hokkaido. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Oki (隠岐国; -no kuni) was an old province of Japan which consisted of Oki Islands in the Sea of Japan, located off the coast of Izumo and Hoki provinces. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Oshima (渡島国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaidō. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Shimo-Usa province (下総国 -no kuni) was a province of Japan located in and around the northern part of modern Chiba Prefecture on the island of Honshu. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Shinano (信濃国; -no kuni) is an old province of Japan that is now present day Nagano prefecture. ... Shiribeshi (後志国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province in Hokkaido Prefecture. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Teshio (天塩国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province located in Hokkaido, corresponding to all of modern-day Rumoi Subprefecture and the northern half of Kamikawa Subprefecture History August 15, 1869 Teshio Province established with 6 districts 1872 Census finds a population of 1,576 1882 Provinces dissolved in Hokkaido... Tokachi (十勝国, -no kuni) was a short-lived province in Hokkaido. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Tsushima (対馬, Korean Daema) was a province of Japan until the abolition of provinces and establishment of prefectures. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Yamato (大和) is a province of Japan, which covers area of present Nara Prefecture. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Satsuma Province - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (171 words)
During the Sengoku period, Satsuma was a fief of the Shimazu daimyo, who ruled much of southern Kyushu from their castle at Kagoshima city.
In 1871, with the abolition of feudal domains and the establishment of prefectures after the Meiji Restoration, the provinces of Satsuma and Osumi were combined to eventually establish Kagoshima prefecture.
Satsuma was one of the main provinces that rose in opposition to the Tokugawa shogunate in the mid 19th century.
Satsuma Province - encyclopedia article about Satsuma Province. (1896 words)
Satsuma was one of the main provinces that rose in opposition to the Tokugawa shogunate The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868.
Satsuma clan The Satsuma Clan was a samurai clan which inhabited the Satsuma province of Japan's Kyushu island.
The ancient capital of the province was located near the modern city of Kurume, Fukuoka; in the Edo period the province was divided into two fiefs: the Tachibana clan held a western fief at Yanagawa, and the Arima clan held an eastern fief at Kurume.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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