FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
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Encyclopedia > Saskatchewan general election, 1905

The First Provincial General Election in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was held on December 13, 1905. Walter Scott led the Liberal Party of Saskatchewan to victory over the Provincial Rights Party of Frederick W. A. G. Haultain, and became the first Premier of the new province.

Party Party Leader Popular Vote # of candidates Seats
# % % Change Previous After Change
Liberal 17,812 52.25 n.a. 25 n.a. 16 n.a.
Provincial Rights 16,184 47.47 n.a. 24 n.a. 9 n.a.
Independent 94 0.28 n.a. 1 n.a. n.a.
Total 34,090 100.00 n.a. 50 n.a. 25 n.a.
Saskatchewan elections: 1905 1908 1912 1917 1921 1925 1929 1934 1938 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1967 1971 1975 1978 1982 1986 1991 1995 1999 2003

Source: Elections Saskatchewan (http://www.elections.sk.ca/history.php#provincialvotesummaries)


n.a. = not applicable – this was the first election held in Saskatchewan.


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