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Encyclopedia > Saruman
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Saruman
Other names
Titles Istari (Wizard)
Race Ainur
Culture Maiar of Aulë
Date of birth Immortal, created by Eru (God) before creation of world.
Date of death November 3, 3019 T.A. (only physically died)
Book(s) The Fellowship of the Ring (mentioned only)
The Two Towers
The Return of the King
The Silmarillion
Unfinished Tales

Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. He is introduced in Fellowship of the Ring, and becomes an important supporting character in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The phrase, Tolkiens legendarium, is commonly used among individuals who study J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Eä as a reference to the many works related to the universe and its legends. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Eru, also called Ilúvatar (the All High or the Father of All as defined in the index of name elements in The Silmarillion), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a film, released on Wednesday, December 19, 2001, directed by Peter Jackson with a runtime of 178 minutes (2 hours, 58 minutes). ... Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ...


Referred to as Saruman the White (Curunír Lán in Tolkien's invented language of Sindarin), he is described as the first of his order of Wizards (or Istari), who came to Middle-earth as emissaries of the Valar in the Third Age. He is introduced as the chief of the Istari, and the leader of the White Council. In The Fellowship of the Ring, it is revealed that he is a servant of Sauron, the trilogy's main villain. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the White Council is a group of Elves and Wizards of Middle-earth, formed in 2463 T.A. to contest the growing power of Dol Guldur, at the request of Galadriel. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ...


In the narrative, his Sindarin name, Curunír, meant Man of skill.

Contents

Characteristics

Middle-earth Portal

Tolkien described Saruman as an old man with white hair and a long white beard with black strands about the lips and ears; in his youth, his hair was raven-dark. He was tall, his face was long, and his eyes were deep and dark. He would appear in a hooded white cloak; later, he changed into a cloak that changed colours as he moved. Image File history File links Arda. ...


He was not actually a Man or even an Elf (as Men often suspected), but a Maia (see Origins below). As such, he was immortal and extremely powerful, yet he had limits on how far these powers could be used. The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... This article is about living for infinite period of time. ...


Knowledge of the "deep arts" (magic) was of particular interest to him, especially when relating to power — such as the Rings of Power and the palantíri. He has also learned in ancient lore regarding powerful kingdoms such as Númenor, Gondor and Moria. His voice and speech were extremely convincing, more powerful than mere rhetoric. When he focused this power on a person or a group of people, he could sway their hearts, plant fears and tell lies as he pleased. Depending on the willpower of the listener, this spell could last as long as the speech did, or it could take root in them and last forever. The concept of Magic in Middle-earth is hard to define: one definition is that it is the defining property that sets J. R. R. Tolkiens imaginary or secondary world (Arda) apart from the real or primary world. ... The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken and written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


His other powers included knowledge of machinery and chemistry, probably inseparable from explicit magic. An instance of this includes the "blasting fire" employed by his Uruk-hai army in the Battle of the Hornburg, featured in The Two Towers. Throughout the trilogy, machinery and engines characterized both his fortified kingdom of Isengard and his altered Shire. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth, the Uruk-hai (Black Speech: Orc folk) were a new breed of Orcs that appeared during the Third Age. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ...


His scientific knowledge also extended to biological areas. He cross-bred Men and Orcs, creating both Men with Orc-like vileness and treachery and Orcs with human size and cunning. He also employed birds in his service, although this might be attributed to fellow wizard Radagast the Brown, ordering them to report to Orthanc, Saruman's stronghold. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... This Tolkien article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe perspective. ... Radagast the Brown is one of the five Wizards in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings and is mentioned in The Hobbit. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ...


For many years, Saruman and Gandalf were friends and partners, and were roughly equals in wisdom and power. Unlike Gandalf, however, Saruman was proud; He saw himself as the most powerful of the Istari, expressing clear contempt for Radagast. He became jealous of Gandalf, eventually convincing himself Gandalf must be scheming against him, to justify his own scheming against Gandalf and the rest of the White Council. For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...


Saruman's arrogance and jealousy turned him into a traitor to the cause he had once served. Saruman's betrayal was not sudden but slowly grew over time, until at last he had convinced himself that he could not have taken any other path. This self-deception kept him from taking his last chance at redemption.


Names and titles

The name given to him by Men, Saruman, is in the Westron language (also invented by Tolkien). In Tolkien's works, this language is almost never shown directly but translated into English and Anglo-Saxon forms. In this case, Tolkien used the Anglo-Saxon root word searu which means "skill" or "cunning." His name among the Elves is Curunír, which is in Sindarin, a language Tolkien did not translate. It means "man of skill," and was often followed by 'Lân, which means "white." In Valinor, his name was Curumo, which is the Quenya version of the same name. His name Sharkey, given by the men before the Scouring of the Shire portrayed in Return of the King, is a bastardisation of the Orkish sharkû, which means "old man". In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Westron or Common Speech is the closest thing to a universal language, at least at the time during which The Lord of the Rings is set. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ...


His original title as a wizard was "the White," and he wore matching robes. Later he declared himself to be "Saruman of Many Colours," and the colour of his robes changed thus. He also declared himself "Saruman Ring-maker," and may have made a less powerful imitation of the Rings of Power; he wore a ring in his confrontation with Gandalf portrayed in Fellowship of the Ring. The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Character Biography

Origins

Saruman was a Maia, a servant of the Valar, the Powers of the world, and of Ilúvatar (God).In Valinor, the land of the Vala, a council was called by Manwë, leader of the Valar, shortly after Sauron's defeat by the Last Alliance of Elves and Men. Though Sauron was overthrown, it would later turn out that he had not been effectively vanquished and his shadow began to fall upon Middle-earth a second time. It was decided to send five emissaries to Middle-earth. These should be "mighty, peers of Sauron, yet forgo might, and clothe themselves in flesh", as they were intended to help men and elves unite against Sauron, but the wizards were forbidden from matching the Dark Lord in power and fear. The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Eru, also called Ilúvatar (the All High or the Father of All as defined in the index of name elements in The Silmarillion), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ...


One of those who went was Curumo (Saruman), a powerful Maia of Aulë, just as Sauron once was. Maiar were angelic beings "of the same order as the Valar but of less degree", as stated by "Of the Maiar", Valaquenta, The Silmarillion. Both the Maiar and the Valar were Ainur, the first created beings, and they existed before Arda (the world) was made. Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A Gothic angel in ivory, c1250, Louvre An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ... The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ...


Middle-earth

"But two only came forward: Curumo, who was chosen by Aulë, and Alatar, who was sent by Oromë". - Unfinished Tales, Part Four, Chapter Two: The Istari

whereas the last one, Olórin (Gandalf), was commanded by Manwë to go. Varda said of Gandalf the Grey, who went as the third Istar, that he was "not the third". Saruman was also asked to take Radagast with him: "Curumo was obliged to take Aiwendil to please Yavanna, wife of Aulë". This may have contributed to his contempt for him. They travelled to Middle-earth with two other Istari, Alatar and Pallando, known as the Blue Wizards. A character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, Varda Elentári is a Vala, wife of Manwë. Varda is said to be too beautiful for words; within her face radiates the light of Iluvatar. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ...


The five wizards arrived at the Grey Havens in the west of Eriador around the year 1000 of the Third Age. Only the keeper of the havens, Círdan the Shipwright, knew Saruman's identity and origin. Saruman would later discover that Círdan had given Narya the Red Ring to Gandalf upon their first landing in Middle-earth. Even though Saruman was immediately considered the head of the order while Gandalf was considered the least, Círdan had divined in Gandalf as the wisest and greatest of the wizards. Saruman's jealousy of Gandalf grew from these events, perhaps because he feared that the Grey would eventually supplant him. The Mithlond or the Grey Havens was a haven (seaport) on the Gulf of Lune in the northwest of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... Eriador (the Lone Lands) is a large region in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Círdan (ship-maker in Sindarin) the Shipwright is a Teleri Elf (of which he was one of the wisest princes), a great mariner and shipwright, lord of the Falas during much of the First Age, the wisest and perhaps the second... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Three Rings of the Elves of Eregion are fictional magical artifacts. ...


Saruman and the two Blue Wizards went into the east of Middle-earth. After one and a half millennia, he returned to the west, just as Sauron's power was growing again in Dol Guldur. In the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Dol Guldur, or Hill of Sorcery, was a stronghold of Sauron located in the south of Mirkwood. ...


White Council

When the White Council was formed at approximately year 2463 of the Third Age, Saruman was appointed its leader, though Galadriel wanted Gandalf in this position. Saruman refused to step down due to his pride, while Gandalf had declined. At this point Saruman had begun to sense the resurgence of Sauron and to envy and desire his power, and especially his One Ring. This was also the same year that the One Ring was taken by the halfling Smeágol (later called Gollum), who disappeared with it into the Misty Mountains for hundreds of years. Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The Misty Mountains as seen in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). ...


It was during the meetings of the Council that Saruman first noted Gandalf's interest in Hobbits and The Shire, and believing that all his deeds related to some as yet undisclosed plan of his for self enhancement, Saruman himself began keeping a greater watch on Gandalf and sent spies to The Shire. At first he himself visited it secretly but stopped when he realized that he had been noticed by its inhabitants. Amongst the purposes of his visits was to procure some of the halfling's leaf, since in secret imitation of Gandalf he had begun to smoke.


In the year 2759 T.A., Saruman settled in Isengard with the permission of the Steward of Gondor, Beren. The stronghold was by then abandoned by Gondor, although he settled only as Warden of the Tower and representative of the Steward. There he became important in the informal alliance defending the west of Middle-earth. In the tower of Isengard, Orthanc, he also found one of the remaining palantíri.


In 2850 T.A., Gandalf entered Dol Guldur and confirmed that the evil presence was indeed Sauron. By Saruman's advice, the White Council decided against attacking Dol Guldur. Gandalf would later remark that it was at this council-meeting that he first began to suspect that Saruman desired to possess the One Ring. Saruman's real intention was to permit Sauron to build up his strength, so that the One Ring would reveal itself. He later found that Sauron had more knowledge of the possible location of the One Ring than he expected, and in 2941 T.A., he finally agreed to attack Dol Guldur.


Ten years after Sauron abandoned Dol Guldur, he returned to Mordor and declared himself openly. He established contact with Saruman through the palantír captured from Minas Ithil, now Minas Morgul. In this year also Saruman took Isengard for his own and began to fortify it. Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Ithil is a fictional fortress in the world of Middle Earth. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ...


War of the Ring

When Gandalf presented Saruman with the discovery and the location of the One Ring, Saruman revealed his desire for it and his alliance with Sauron. When Gandalf refused to join with him, he held him captive in Isengard. Gandalf later escaped with help from Gwaihir the Windlord, one of Middle-Earth's large eagles, and made Saruman's treachery known to the rest of the White Council.


Saruman also betrayed Sauron by lying to the Nazgûl, who were searching for Baggins, who had found the One Ring years before. He pretended to know nothing, but the Nazgûl later captured Gríma Wormtongue as he was hastening from Edoras to warn Saruman that Gandalf had been there and had warned the King about his treacherous plans for Rohan. The Nazgûl Lord spared his life after learning from him that Saruman indeed knew where the Shire was, and he even went further to give them general directions to follow the Greenway (the old North-South Road). Along the Road they met one of his Shire spies from whom they got detailed maps of the Shire made by Saruman. They sent the spy back to the Shire after warning him that he was now in the service of Mordor (the Orc-like man in the Inn of the Prancing Pony). Believing that he would find no pity from either quarter (a false assumption, since he was later offered pardon by Gandalf), Saruman now put all efforts into obtaining the One Ring for himself. Not all of these efforts ever became clear, but they included sending spies to waylay Frodo Baggins on his flight from the Shire (Bill Ferny in Bree), attacking Rohan outright with Uruk-hai and dispatching raiding parties of Uruk-hai accompanied by Moria Orcs on likely routes the Fellowship of the Ring might take to Gondor. One of those parties captured Peregrin Took and Meriadoc Brandybuck after slaying Boromir with arrows as he tried to defend Pippin & Merry, which led Aragorn, Legolas & Gimli on a search which eventually led them to the breaking of Isengard by the Ents under Treebeard (Fangorn). Nazgûl ilustration. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Inn of the Prancing Pony was an inn where Frodo Baggins met Aragorn. ... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... An Ash Ent in the Lord of the Rings movie series Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


His plans failed, and Saruman suffered a series of setbacks. Saruman's Shire network did not capture Frodo Baggins; and Éomer destroyed his only partially successful raiding party. His invasion of Rohan ended in disaster, with the utter defeat of his army at the Battle of the Hornburg. Leaving Isengard undefended resulted in its destruction at the hands of the Ents (Saruman had underestimated the Ents' anger and strength). Éomer is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... An Ash Ent in the Lord of the Rings movie series Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


Confined to the Orthanc and with his servants scattered or killed, Saruman made one final unsuccessful attempt to turn Théoden and Gandalf. The latter then offered Saruman a chance for redemption, which involved surrendering his staff and the keys to the Orthanc as a pledge. Saruman refused out of pride and fear. Gandalf, who had returned from death to supplant Saruman as the White and the head of the Istari, expelled Saruman from the order and broke his staff. Saruman also lost the palantír of Orthanc when Gríma Wormtongue threw it off a balcony of Orthanc, undecided about which he hated more, Saruman or Gandalf, and hitting neither. In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... Gríma, called (the) Wormtongue, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ...


Left out of the final stages of the War of the Ring, he eventually managed to convince the Ents who kept him captive into letting him leave Isengard after he met the conditions of handing over the keys of Orthanc. He then went to the Shire, which his agents lead by Lotho Sackville-Baggins had brought under control. Spending his final days as a small-time thug lord in Hobbiton known as Sharkey, where he enslaved the Hobbits, he was eventually betrayed and killed by his own servant Gríma Wormtongue on November 3, T.A. 3019, after the Battle of Bywater, where the Hobbits had Saruman's thugs surrounded with many Took bowmen, and as the thugs tried to fight their way out, they were shot. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Baggins family is a remarkable and rich Hobbit family. ... In J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Shire is subdivided into several regions. ... Gríma, called (the) Wormtongue, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Combatants Hobbits of The Shire Ruffians in the service of Saruman Commanders Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took Ruffian chief†, Saruman†, Wormtongue† Strength 200 local Hobbits of the Shire under Meriadoc Brandybuck, including Tolman Cotton and Samwise Gamgee, and 110 Tooks from Tookland under Peregrin Took slightly over 200 Casualties 19...


Saruman, being a Maia, did not truly die. His spirit separated from his body much like Sauron's after the Downfall of Númenor. As a discorporated spirit, he should have been called to Mandos, but the tale implies that he was barred from returning. Tolkien indicated that his spirit was left naked, powerless and wandering, never to return to Middle-earth: It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... Akallabêth is the fourth part of the fictional work The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ...

"Whereas Curunir was cast down, and utterly humbled, and perished at last by the hand of an oppressed slave; and his spirit went whithersoever it was doomed to go, and to Middle-earth, whether naked or embodied, came never back" - Unfinished Tales, Part Four, Chapter Two: The Istari

In Unfinished Tales, when the King Elessar entered the Orthanc with the intent of re-ordering that realm. Inside, Elessar's men found many treasures that Saruman had conned off of King Théoden. There was a secret closet that could only be found with the aid of Gimli the dwarf; it contained the original Elendilmir, which had presumed to be lost forever when Isildur perished in the Gladden Fields, as well as a golden chain which was presumed to have once borne the One Ring. Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Star of Elendil was a white precious jewel (diamond?) worn by Elendil and his heirs, and then by the chieftains of the Dúnedain in Arnor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... The Gladden Fields (Sindarin Loeg Ningloron) is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ...


Adaptations

In Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated adaptation of The Lord of the Rings, Fraser Kerr provided the voice of Saruman. At one point in that film's development, film executives thought that the names "Saruman" and "Sauron" were too similar, and would confuse the audience and decided that Saruman should be renamed "Aruman". This decision was eventually reversed, but some references to "Aruman" remained in the finished film. The dialogue of Bakshi's film retained Saruman's adoption of the title "Saruman of Many Colours", and the character was dressed in different shades of red. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (853x480, 64 KB) Summary Saruman of many colors. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (853x480, 64 KB) Summary Saruman of many colors. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ...


Peter Howell played Saruman in BBC Radio's 1981 serialization of The Lord of the Rings. BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ...

In Peter Jackson's film trilogy, Saruman was played by Christopher Lee. Image File history File links SarumanLOTR.jpg‎ http://www. ... Image File history File links SarumanLOTR.jpg‎ http://www. ... Christopher Frank Carandini Lee, CBE (born May 27, 1922) is an English actor known for his professional longevity and his distinctive basso delivery. ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a three-time Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA winning New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novels... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... Christopher Frank Carandini Lee, CBE (born May 27, 1922) is an English actor known for his professional longevity and his distinctive basso delivery. ...


In the films, Saruman is Sauron's servant, an interpretation that downplays the idea that Saruman was independently seeking the Ring. Jackson's films do not include the title "Saruman of Many Colours", referring to him only as "Saruman the White". The film trilogy also did not include the Scouring of the Shire, but the extended DVD version does depict Saruman being killed by Gríma Wormtongue in Isengard, after his encounter with Gandalf and Théoden. In the film, Gríma stabs Saruman in the back, causing him to fall on a spiked wheel below the tower of Orthanc. In the original version, Saruman is never shown after Isengard is destroyed. All that was revealed was that he was locked in Orthanc by Treebeard and stripped of his power. Jackson reasoned that it would be anticlimactic to show Saruman's fate in the second movie (after the Battle of Helm's Deep) and too retrospective for it to be in the third one.[1] The Scouring of the Shire is the second to last chapter in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties...


Actor/musician Brian Protheroe is cast for the (non-singing) role in the London The Lord of the Rings stage musical production. Brian Protheroe (born 16 June 1944 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England) is an actor. ... This article is about the musical. ...


Relationship with Sauron

There is some debate whether Saruman succumbed to Sauron's will and became in secret a reluctant subject of Mordor. In Jackson's film trilogy, Saruman is described as a servant being used by Sauron. In the second film, Galadriel and Faramir figure out that Isengard and Mordor are attacking Rohan and Gondor from both sides to keep the allies occupied. However, though it is made prominently in Jackson's film trilogy, this is far less so in Tolkien's works.


In Unfinished Tales, Saruman is subtly but knowingly causing trouble for Sauron's attempt to find the One Ring. Sauron himself realizes Saruman's dealings after a time but at the moment his arm is not long enough to reach Isengard, with Rohan and Gondor still standing in the way. The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ...


See also

  • Maia (Middle-earth)
  • Wizard (Middle-earth)
  • Isengard

The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ...

External links

  • Saruman at the Encyclopedia of Arda.
  • Saruman at The One Ring.net.
  • Saruman at The Thain's Book.
  • Christopher Lee Talks Lord of the Rings


Ainur from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium
Ainulindalë (Music of the Ainur)
Lords of the Valar:  Manwë | Ulmo | Aulë | Oromë | Námo (Mandos) | Irmo (Lórien) | Tulkas
Queens of the Valar (The Valier):  Varda | Yavanna | Nienna | Estë | Vairë | Vána | Nessa
The Enemy:  Morgoth (a.k.a. Melkor)
Maiar:  Eönwë | Ilmarë | Ossë | Uinen | Salmar | Sauron | Melian | Arien | Tilion | Gothmog
Curumo (Saruman) | Olórin (Gandalf) | Aiwendil (Radagast) | Alatar and Pallando | Durin's Bane


The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... Ainulindalë is the first section and chapter of The Silmarillion (an abridged and condensed collection of fictional legends presented as histories, written over some 60+ years by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited and published posthumously in 1977 by his son, Christopher Tolkien). ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... Ulmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Oromë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Irmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Tulkas (from the Valarin Tulukastâz meaning the Golden-Haired) is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, Varda Elentári is a Vala, wife of Manwë. Varda is said to be too beautiful for words; within her face radiates the light of Iluvatar. ... Yavanna Kementári is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Nienna is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Estë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Vairë the Weaver is a Vala from the world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Vána is the name of a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Nessa is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... In Tolkiens fictional world, Eönwë was the banner-bearer and the herald of Manwë, and Chief of the Maiar along with Ilmarë. Eönwë was referred to as the greatest of arms in Arda, meaning that he was the best with weapons, though not necessarily the most powerful. ... Ilmarë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Ossë (from the Valarin OÅ¡oÅ¡ai, OÅ¡Å¡ai) was a Maia associated with Ulmo. ... Uinen was Ossës wife in the Middle-earth mythos of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Salmar is a Maia in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe, Middle-earth. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... Melian is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Arien was the maiden whom the Valar chose from among the Maiar to guide the vessel of the Sun. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Tilion was the youth whom the Valar chose from among the Maiar to steer the island of the Moon. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Gothmog was the Lord of the Balrogs and the High-Captain of Angband, one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord Morgoth with a rank equal to that of Sauron. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Radagast the Brown is one of the five Wizards in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings and is mentioned in The Hobbit. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... Durins Bane from Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saruman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4459 words)
Saruman likely was true to his mission in the beginning, and actually believed in working to stop Sauron, but his pride and later arrogance (as well as his jealousy towards the Grey Wanderer) turned him into a traitor to the cause he had once served.
Saruman, as a Maia, did not truly die, but his spirit was sundered from his body (much like Sauron's after the Downfall of Númenor, after his defeat by the Last Alliance and after the destruction of the One Ring).
Saruman was once on good terms with the Elves, and was voted in as the leader of the White Council, a group of Elves and Istari united against Sauron.
Saruman - definition of Saruman in Encyclopedia (3994 words)
Saruman likely was true to his mission in the beginning, and actually believed in working to stop Sauron, but his pride and later arrogance turned him into a traitor to the cause he had once served.
Saruman was charged to take Radagast with him, which he did not wish to do and which led to contempt for the latter Wizard.
Saruman still made a final attempt to woo Théoden, the king of Rohan, and Gandalf to his cause but failed: his staff was broken and he was dismissed from the order of the Istari.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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