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Encyclopedia > Sarlacc
The Great Pit of Carkoon with the original Sarlacc from Return of the Jedi (1983).

The Sarlacc (plural Sarlacci) is a fictional creature in George Lucas's science fiction saga Star Wars. It first appeared in the film Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) as a multi-tentacled alien beast whose immense, gaping mouth is lined with several rows of sharp teeth. The Sarlacc in the film inhabits the Great Pit of Carkoon, a depression in the sand of the desert planet Tatooine. This creature is the largest of several Sarlacci scattered across the Star Wars galaxy.[1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (547x697, 43 KB) Scene from the film Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) featuring the sarlacc and one of Jabba the Hutts skiffs at the Great Pit of Carkoon. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (547x697, 43 KB) Scene from the film Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) featuring the sarlacc and one of Jabba the Hutts skiffs at the Great Pit of Carkoon. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the series. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... In popular fiction and conspiracy theories, life forms, especially intelligent life forms, that are of extraterrestrial origin, i. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... For other uses, see Star Wars Galaxy. ...


In the original Return of the Jedi, the Sarlacc is simply an inanimate hole in the desert sand which characters fall into and are consumed; some are pulled into the Sarlacc's mouth by its tentacles. Lucas revised the Sarlacc's appearance in the 1997 Special Edition of the film by adding computer-generated tentacles and beak that emerge from the opened mouth. Besides Return of the Jedi, the creature and others like it are featured in Star Wars literature. The Original trilogy (often OT) is: Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi See also Prequel trilogy Categories: Star Wars ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... The seawater creature in The Abyss marked CGIs acceptance in the visual effects industry. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Like other aspects of Star Wars, the Sarlacc became a part of popular culture. The creature was incorporated into the merchandising campaign that accompanied the release of Return of the Jedi. It is the subject of analysis and humor in works of literature unassociated with Star Wars.[2][3] Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ...

Contents

Description and characterization

According to the Star Wars Databank, the Sarlacc is one of the rarer and more mysterious creatures in the Star Wars universe. Because Sarlacci are very dangerous and inhabit remote, inhospitable locations in the galaxy, few scientists have attempted to observe them. Those who do study the Sarlacc argue over its taxonomic classification. While most strongly agree that the Sarlacc is an arthropod (as stated in the The Essential Guide to Alien Species and The Wildlife of Star Wars), others point to its anchored root system and spore-based method of reproduction as evidence of a plant origin.[1] A Sarlacc reproduces by releasing spores that travel through Outer Space and eventually come to rest on a planet or asteroid's surface, forming a pit which is used for capturing prey.[4] Screenshot of the online Star Wars Databank in July 2006 The Star Wars Databank is the official Star Wars sites repository of information on characters, locations, and technology, sorted by category. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... Subphyla and Classes Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Trilobita - trilobites (extinct) Subphylum Chelicerata Arachnida - spiders,scorpions, etc. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Layers of Atmosphere - not to scale (NOAA)[1] Outer space, sometimes simply called space, refers to the relatively empty regions of the universe outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ...

Kithaba is captured by the Sarlacc and drawn into its beak by a tentacle.
Kithaba is captured by the Sarlacc and drawn into its beak by a tentacle.

Stephen J. Sansweet's Star Wars Encyclopedia describes the Sarlacc as an "omnivorous, multi-tentacled creature with needle-sharp teeth and a large beak".[5] The Sarlacc rests at the base of a giant pit where the entirety of its body is buried except for the gaping mouth. The creature's beak blindly gropes along the sloped walls of the pit when the sand is disturbed, searching for prey. The Sarlacc's mouth can reach three meters (9.84 feet) in diameter; it is positioned on its giant, worm-like head.[6] Astrophysicist and science-fiction author Jeanne Cavelos compares the Sarlacc to the antlion, an insect found in the southern United States that burrows a pit in the sand during its larval stage. Both creatures catch and consume prey that falls into the pit.[7] Image File history File links BaradaandSarlaac. ... Image File history File links BaradaandSarlaac. ... Stephen J. Sansweet (born 1945) is the director of content management at Lucasfilm and the owner of worlds largest private collection of Star Wars items located at his house which he calls Rancho Obi-Wan. ... Star Wars Encyclopedia is a 1998 reference book written by Stephen J. Sansweet, the director of content management at Lucasfilm and science fiction author. ... Omnivores are organisms that consume both plants and animals. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Antlions are a family of insects in the order Neuroptera, classified as Myrmeleontidae (sometimes spelled as Myrmeleonidae), from the Greek myrmex, meaning ant, and leo(n), meaning lion; the most known genus is Myrmeleo. ... Historic Southern United States. ... A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ...


Because most Sarlacci inhabit isolated environments and rely on prey to stumble into their pit, they rarely feed. As a result, Sarlacci have evolved an efficient digestive process. The stomach of a Sarlacc slowly dissolves prey into nutrients in a painful process that can last for several thousands of years. Victims are kept alive in the acid-filled stomach throughout digestion and few ever escape.[6] This is one aspect of the Sarlacc that makes it such a feared creature. As the droid C-3PO announces in Return of the Jedi, "In his belly, you will find a new definition of pain and suffering as you are slowly digested over a thousand years." If no living prey is available, a Sarlacc relies on its root system to absorb nutrients. One Sarlacc located on an airless moon feeds on cometary material rich in oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen that drifts into its mouth.[8] Luke Skywalker in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope along side astromech droid R2-D2, and protocol droid C-3PO. This is the concept of the droid in science fiction. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ...


The Sarlacc's stomach is lined with a fibrous network of vessels that attach themselves to a swallowed victim. According to the Star Wars Databank, the prey is incorporated into the Sarlacc's biological system as it is digested. Besides digestive acids, the stomach also contains mind-altering neurotoxins which keep victims from struggling and escaping. The toxins induce hallucinations in prey which "suggest that the Sarlacc somehow absorbs the intelligence of all its victims, who live on in disembodied torment."[1] A Sarlacc can communicate with its victims through this stolen consciousness.[4] In one Star Wars short story, an old, unnamed Jedi woman who falls into the Sarlacc on Tatooine explains that "Sarlacci do interesting things with messenger RNA: over the course of millennia, they can attain a sort of group consciousness, built out of the remains of people they've digested. I talked to such a Sarlacc, once a few decades ago." She too becomes part of the Sarlacc's consciousness.[8] A neurotoxin is a toxin that acts specifically on nerve cells – neurons – usually by interacting with membrane proteins such as ion channels. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... Jedi Knights and Jedi Knight redirect here. ... The life cycle of an mRNA in a eukaryotic cell. ...


Appearances in Star Wars fiction

The Sarlacc is a creature in Star Wars fiction that first appeared in the 1983 film Return of the Jedi. Crime lord Jabba the Hutt attempts to execute Jedi knight Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), smuggler Han Solo (Harrison Ford), and the Wookiee Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew)—dubbed "victims of the almighty Sarlacc"—by dropping them into the creature's gaping maw. Luke frees himself and the others with the aid of Lando Calrissian (Billy Dee Williams) and droid R2-D2. A skirmish ensues that ends with several of Jabba's henchmen, including the notorious bounty hunter Boba Fett (Jeremy Bulloch), tumbling into the Sarlacc's mouth. Jabba the Hutt is a fictional character in George Lucass science fiction saga Star Wars. ... Jedi Knights and Jedi Knight redirect here. ... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... Han Solo is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... A Wookiee is a member of a race of hirsute bipeds in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Chewbacca (or Chewie) is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... Peter Mayhew (born May 19, 1944 in Barnes, London, England) is an English actor best known for playing the Wookiee Chewbacca in the Star Wars movies. ... Lando Calrissian is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, portrayed by Billy Dee Williams. ... Billy Dee Williams (born April 6, 1937) is an American actor who for a period in the 1970s rivaled Sidney Poitier as the most popular black actor in American film. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bulloch as Boba Fett (right) in The Empire Strikes Back. ...

A Jawa with the spore of a Sarlacc from "Fortune, Fate, and the Natural History of the Sarlacc," Star Wars Tales 6 (2000).
A Jawa with the spore of a Sarlacc from "Fortune, Fate, and the Natural History of the Sarlacc," Star Wars Tales 6 (2000).

Two short stories in the anthology Tales from Jabba's Palace (1995) edited by science-fiction author Kevin J. Anderson focus on the Sarlacc of Tatooine. Dan'l Danehy-Oakes's story "Shaara and the Sarlacc: The Skiff Guard's Tale" is told from the point-of-view of one of Jabba the Hutt's unnamed skiff guards. En route to the Sarlacc's pit, the guard tells Boba Fett about his sister Shaara's miraculous escape from the Sarlacc. Shaara and her Imperial stormtrooper captors are thrown into the pit when their landspeeder explodes. The Sarlacc swallows the stormtroopers, but expels Shaara. The skiff guard cannot explain why the Sarlacc rejected its prey, but he suspects the creature might possess some kind of primitive intelligence since "[n]obody really knows anything about the Sarlacc."[9] Image File history File links SarlaccSpore. ... Image File history File links SarlaccSpore. ... // The Falleen are a scaled, cold-blooded, reptilian humanoid species with pigmentation that varies with mood, known to be as long lived as the Hutts (the Falleen have an average lifespan of 250 Standard Years) who inhabit and originate from the planet Falleen. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Star Wars Tales Volume 2 is the second Star Wars Tales trade paperback, collecting issues 5-8. ... This article is in need of attention. ... An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems. ... Tales From Jabbas Palace (1995) is an anthology of short stories set in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... |200px| ]] Pseudonym: Gabriel Mesta Born: March 27, 1962 ) Oregon, Wisconsin, U.S. Occupation: Author Genres: Science fiction Debut works: Resurrection, Inc Influences: The War of the Worlds Kevin J. Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is a prolific American science fiction author. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Stormtroopers have distinctive white armor and a helmet with a grimacing, skull-like visage. ... Landspeeders are the Star Wars equivilent of automobiles. ...


The skiff guard from Danehy-Oakes's story tells Boba Fett, "Stay right here in the skiff and I can promise you a truly amazing view. You may even see what few have seen and lived: the Sarlacc's belly."[9] The skiff guard's promise is kept in the short story "A Barve Like That: The Tale of Boba Fett." Written by Daniel Keys Moran under the pseudonym J. D. Montgomery, the story focuses on Boba Fett's struggle to free himself from the belly of the Sarlacc. As Fett is digested, the creature taps into his mind and proceeds to have a conversation with the bounty hunter. The Sarlacc informs Fett, "[Your] life and death belong to me now, not you; and they serve my purpose. Recognize and understand your place in things, Boba Fett, for you are not even a real thing; merely a collection of thoughts that has deluded itself into a belief in its own existence."[10] The voice belongs to an alien named Susejo who was eaten by the Sarlacc four thousand years earlier. The Sarlacc absorbed the alien's consciousness and communicates with Fett through him. Despite the hopeless nature of the situation, the bounty hunter manages to ignite his jet pack, causing it to explode; he then uses a concussion grenade to blast himself free from the Sarlacc. Fett is the only person known to survive being swallowed by a Sarlacc. Years later, Fett returns to Tatooine in a new ship. As he approaches the surface of the planet, he flies past the Pit of Carkoon as a voice in his mind sounds, "YOU!".[1] Daniel Keys Moran (DKM) is a computer programmer and a writer of science fiction, who was born on November 30, 1962 to Richard Joseph Moran and Marilynn Joyce Moran. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... Grenade redirects here. ...


The history of the Sarlacc is featured in the non-canonical Dark Horse comic "Fortune, Fate, and the Natural History of the Sarlacc" written by Mark Schultz and illustrated by Kellie Strom. The story is printed in Star Wars Tales 6 (2000). In this story, the Sarlacc seen in Return of the Jedi is the offspring of an older Sarlacc on Tatooine. Shortly after the execution of an unknown alien named Grubbat Fhilch, the Sarlacc releases a spore that attaches to an Imperial stormtrooper's dewback. The stormtroopers hire a group of Jawa scavengers to clean the dewbacks and one of them discovers the spore. Not knowing what it had found, the Jawa places the spore into a jar of water. The spore grows into a young Sarlacc and soon escapes from the jar only to be swallowed by a spider-like creature. The Sarlacc, however, kills the creature and eats it from the inside out. The young Sarlacc buries itself in the sand and forms the Great Pit of Carkoon.[11] The Star Wars canon consists of the six Star Wars feature films, along with all officially licensed, non-contradicting spin-off works to the six films. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See comedian Stand up comedian List of Comedians List of British comedians comics comic book comic strip underground comics alternative comics web comic sprite comics manga graphic novel List of comic characters This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Mark Schultz is an American comicbook writer and artist. ... Star Wars Tales Volume 2 is the second Star Wars Tales trade paperback, collecting issues 5-8. ... Stormtroopers have distinctive white armor and a helmet with a grimacing, skull-like visage. ... This is a list of Creatures in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... // The Falleen are a scaled, cold-blooded, reptilian humanoid species with pigmentation that varies with mood, known to be as long lived as the Hutts (the Falleen have an average lifespan of 250 Standard Years) who inhabit and originate from the planet Falleen. ...


Sarlacci have made minor appearances in Star Wars video games such as Super Star Wars (1992), Star Wars: Demolition (2000), Star Wars: Bounty Hunter (2002), Star Wars Rogue Squadron III: Rebel Strike (2003), and Star Wars: Battlefront (2004). The MMORPG Star Wars Galaxies (2003) shows one of the smaller Sarlacci in the Star Wars galaxy located on the remote planet Dathomir. It has also made an appearance in LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy. Super Star Wars is the first of a series of three Super Nintendo games based on the original three films of the Star Wars series. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... For other uses, see Star Wars Galaxy. ... // Main article: Caamas Caamas is a toxic planet in the Cirius System that was formerly a highly populated habitable world, until the Empire bombarded it shortly after the Clone Wars, killing nearly all the inhabitants of the planet. ...


Concept and creation

The design of the Sarlacc creature—originally called the "Sloth Pit"[12]—seen in Return of the Jedi evolved during the concept, creation, and filming processes. Early concept sketches portrayed a Sarlacc creature with several moving tentacles and a pronounced beak. The Sarlacc was designed to be very animated. Star Wars creator George Lucas, however, did not have the technology or financial resources to realize this concept in the 1983 film.[13] This article is about the South American mammal. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ...

Concept art for the Sarlacc by Industrial Light and Magic.
Concept art for the Sarlacc by Industrial Light and Magic.

The creature seen in Return of the Jedi is very inanimate. Special effects artists Stuart Freeborn, Phil Tippett, and the crew of Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) constructed a pit in the desert sands of Yuma, Arizona, that contained a gaping mouth and tentacles. At the time, the pit (along with Jabba the Hutt's sail barge) constituted one of the largest motion picture sets ever constructed.[14] A hydraulic system was designed to animate the creature, but the blowing sand clogged the mechanism. The film crew instead used poles and wires to move the creature's tentacles.[13] Lucas was not satisfied with the effect, complaining, "There was nothing alive about the whole thing."[15] Image File history File links SarlaccConceptArt. ... Image File history File links SarlaccConceptArt. ... Industrial Light & Magic original logo, designed by Drew Struzan Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) is a motion picture special visual effects company, founded in May 1975 by George Lucas and owned by Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Stuart Freeborn (born September 5, 1914, in London, England) is a British motion picture make-up artist, perhaps best known for his work on the original Star Wars trilogy. ... Phil Tippett (born 1951) is a movie director and an award-winning Visual effects Supervisor and Producer, who specializes in creature design and character animation. ... Industrial Light & Magic original logo, designed by Drew Struzan Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) is a motion picture special visual effects company, founded in May 1975 by George Lucas and owned by Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Yuma is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Yuma County, Arizona, United States. ... Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the use of liquids to perform mechanical tasks. ...


Working on the giant set was an arduous task, according to the crew members involved. Tippett told Starlog magazine, "We were working the creature at the bottom of a gorge, so we got no breeze. Sand constantly fell down upon us." In addition to operating the Sarlacc, many technicians were standing in as skiff guards in full wardrobe. Tippett remarks, "[We] were covered with [sand and] glue from the costumes. I almost cracked on that one. I think I cried, it was so terrible."[16] Actress Carrie Fisher recalled that many of the crew and stunt men who fell into the creature during filming suffered broken legs and sprained ankles.[17] ILM crew members received some satisfaction when they dismantled the set at the conclusion of filming and sold it to Mexico as scrap. The one condition of the sale was that the materials were not to be resold as souvenirs.[18] Starlog is a science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... A gorge is a narrow passage between steep mountains or hills. ... Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist. ...

The Special Edition version of the Sarlacc with CGI beak and tentacles.
The Special Edition version of the Sarlacc with CGI beak and tentacles.

The Sarlacc design underwent a series of changes when Lucas released the Special Edition of Return of the Jedi in 1997. Employing the new technology of computer-generated imagery (CGI), ILM enhanced the creature's appearance with the addition of CGI tentacles and a beak inside the Sarlacc's mouth.[19] According to Lucas, it "just looks much more realistic and more threatening ... it helps the scene considerably."[15] Subsequent depictions of the Sarlacc in Star Wars fiction are based on this revised design. Image File history File links Sarlacc. ... Image File history File links Sarlacc. ... Computer-generated imagery (commonly abbreviated as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... Computer-generated imagery (commonly abbreviated as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Lucas did retain some of the special effects from the 1983 film in the Special Edition. The tentacle that captures the skiff guard Kithaba and pulls him into the Sarlacc mouth is from the original film, as well as the tentacle that attaches to Lando Calrissian's leg. The only revision made to the two scenes involved the CGI beak.[19]


Sarlacc in popular culture

Like other aspects of Star Wars fiction, the Sarlacc quickly became part of Western popular culture. Aside from Star Wars fiction and merchandising, the creature has appeared in critiques of the Star Wars films as a sexual metaphor. One popular fiction author uses the Sarlacc as a descriptive term for slowness, a reference to the Sarlacc's extended digestive process.[3] For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common example of product merchandising. ...


The Sarlacc became part of Return of the Jedi's merchandising campaign that accompanied the theatrical release of the film. Parker Brothers produced a board game in 1983 called Battle at Sarlacc's Pit that was sold in the United States and Canada. Players collect points for battling their way through Gamorrean Guards, Boba Fett, and a Nikto on Jabba the Hutt's sail barge, pushing them overboard into a cardboard Sarlacc.[20] The game, which sold for only a few years, is a collector's item.[21] The Parker Brothers logo. ... A board game is a game played with counters or pieces that are placed on, removed from, or moved across a board (a premarked surface, usually specific to that game). ... // The Falleen are a scaled, cold-blooded, reptilian humanoid species with pigmentation that varies with mood, known to be as long lived as the Hutts (the Falleen have an average lifespan of 250 Standard Years) who inhabit and originate from the planet Falleen. ... Image:Nikto jedi. ...


Hollywood journalist and humor writer Peter Biskind muses that George Lucas went to great extremes to remove aspects of sex and sexuality from the plot of the Star Wars films. Biskind, however, asserts that Lucas created a "nightmarishly explicit image of threatening female sexuality" in the form of the Sarlacc: "The Jabba episode culminates in an explicit vagina dentata fantasy, as Luke and his pals have to walk a phallic gangplank into the pullulating maw—festooned with long, curved teeth—of the giant Sarlacc in its 'nesting place'."[2] Premiere Magazine reviewer Tim Bissell complained, "Lucas sent his trilogy’s most arresting character [Boba Fett] to a death so inglorious—falling headlong into the vagina dentata of Tatooine’s Sarlacc—that its only payoff was a burp gag."[22] ... Peter Biskind is a journalist and author famous for some of his entertaining and provocative portrayals of life in Hollywood in books like Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood, Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Film... Vagina dentata is Latin for toothed vagina. ... The phallus usually refers to the male penis, or sex organ. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


British author Stefan Demetriou's novel How to Disappear Completely (2005) employs the Sarlacc as a literary device to describe a character's reaction to news that her friend's wife had an affair. Demetriou writes, "Laura exhales in shock, slowly digesting the information as if she were the Sarlacc Pit in Return of the Jedi. I wonder if Laura knows what the Sarlacc Pit in Return of the Jedi is. I bet I could ask every guy in the office and he'd know." Sarcastically, Demetriou adds, "Weird Tim in the corner would even take off his baseball cap to [show] proper respect at the mention of Boba Fett's demise."[3] A simile is a comparison of two unlike things, typically marked by use of like, as, than, or resembles. Common examples are Curley was flopping like a fish on a line(extract of Mice and Men) etc. ...


It is also shown in Blizzard's strategy game Starcraft, in the desert map. “Starcraft” redirects here. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Sarlacc, Expanded Universe, in the Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 10, 2006.
  2. ^ a b Peter Biskind, Gods And Monsters: Movers, Shakers, and Other Casualties of the Hollywood Machine (New York: Nation Books, 2004), p. 129, ISBN 1-56025-545-5.
  3. ^ a b c Stefan Demetriou, How to Disappear Completely (Oxford, Eng.: Reverb, 2005), p. 166, ISBN 1-905315-06-6.
  4. ^ a b "Sarlacci spores," Stephen J. Sansweet, Star Wars Encyclopedia (New York: Del Rey, 1998), p. 258, ISBN 0-345-40227-8.
  5. ^ "Sarlacc," Star Wars Encyclopedia, p. 258.
  6. ^ a b Sarlacc, The Movies, in the Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 10, 2006.
  7. ^ Jeanne Cavelos, The Science of Star Wars: An Astrophysicist's Independent Examination of Space Travel, Aliens, Planets, and Robots as Portrayed in the Star Wars Films and Books(New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), p. 71, ISBN 0-312-20958-4.
  8. ^ a b J. D. Montgomery, "A Barve Like That: The Tale of Boba Fett," in Tales from Jabba's Palace, ed. Kevin J. Anderson (paperback; New York: Bantam Spectra, 1996), p. 364, ISBN 0-553-56815-9.
  9. ^ a b Dan'l Danehy-Oakes, "Shaara and the Sarlacc: The Skiff Guard's Tale," Tales from Jabba's Palace, p. 345.
  10. ^ Montgomery, "A Barve Like That," pp. 355-356, italics in the original.
  11. ^ Mark Schultz, "Fortune, Fate, and the Natural History of the Sarlacc," illustrated by Kellie Strom, in Star Wars Tales 6 (Dark Horse Comics, 2000).
  12. ^ Laurent Bouzereau, Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays (New York: Del Rey, 1997), p. 253, ISBN 0-345-40981-7
  13. ^ a b Sarlacc, Behind the Scenes, in the Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 10, 2006.
  14. ^ From Star Wars to Jedi: The Making of a Saga, narrated by Mark Hamill (1985; VHS, CBS Fox Video, 1992).
  15. ^ a b George Lucas, commentary, Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Special Edition (VHS, 20th Century Fox, 1997).
  16. ^ Phil Tippett, interview with Starlog, quoted in Lee Pfeiffer and Michael Lewis, The Films of Harrison Ford (3rd ed.;New York: Citadel Press, 2002), p. 132, ISBN 0-8065-2364-6.
  17. ^ Carrie Fisher, commentary, Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Special Edition (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2004).
  18. ^ Pfeiffer and Lewis, Films of Harrison Ford, p. 132.
  19. ^ a b "Return of the Jedi Special Edition: What has Changed?," January 15, 1997, at StarWars.com; last accessed July 10, 2006.
  20. ^ Description of Battle at Sarlacc's Pit at Board Game Geek; last accessed July 10, 2006; instructions available from Hasbro.
  21. ^ Geoffrey T Carlton, Star Wars Super Collector's Wish Book: Identification & Values (Paducah, Ky.: Collector Books, 2003), p. 273, ISBN 1-57432-334-2.
  22. ^ Tim Bissell, "The Importance of Being Fett: A brief history of one of the most popular characters in the Star Wars universe," at Premiere Magazine; last accessed July 10, 2006.

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Further reading

  • Carrau, Bob. The Wildlife of Star Wars: A Field Guide. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2001. ISBN 0-8118-2869-7.
  • Lewis, Ann Margaret. The Essential Guide to Alien Species. New York: Del Rey, 2001. ISBN 0-345-44220-2.
  • Slavicsek, Bill. A Guide to the Star Wars Universe 3rd ed.; New York: Del Rey, 2000. ISBN 0-345-42066-7.

External links


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Star Wars: Databank | sarlacc (223 words)
The Sarlacc has been a puzzle to xenobiologists for years.
On the few planets where Sarlaccs are found, legends have arisen regarding the creature.
The hallucinations coaxed by the toxins suggest that the Sarlacc somehow absorbs the intelligence of all its victims, who live on in disembodied torment.
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