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Encyclopedia > Sark
Sèr
Sercq
Sark
Flag of Sark Coat of arms of Sark
The location of the Channel Islands in Europe
Aerial view of Sark; North is to the left, Little Sark in the upper right and Brecqhou below it.
Capital La Seigneurie1
49°26.4′N 2°21.7′W / 49.44, -2.3617
Official languages English, French
Recognised regional languages Sercquiais
Government
 -  Seigneur of Sark John Michael Beaumont
Part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey
(Crown dependency of the British Crown)
 -  Elizabeth I of England granted the fief to Hellier de Carteret 1565 
Area
 -  Total 5.45 km² 
2.13 sq mi 
Population
 -   estimate 600 
 -  Density 110.09/km² 
285.1/sq mi
Currency Pound sterling2 (GBP)
Time zone GMT
 -  Summer (DST)  (UTC+1)
Internet TLD .gg  (Guernsey)
Calling code +44(0)1481
1 Head of government. Sark has no capital
2 See Guernsey pound, notes and coins generally not legal tender outside Guernsey

Sark (French: Sercq; Sercquiais: Sèr) is a small island in the southwestern English Channel. It is one of the Channel Islands, and is part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. It has a population of about 600. The island is a car-free zone where the only vehicles allowed are horse-drawn vehicles, bicycles, tractors, and battery-powered buggies or motorised bicycles for elderly or disabled people. Passengers and goods arriving by ferry from Guernsey are transported from the wharf by tractor-pulled vehicles. Sark's main industries are tourism, crafts and finance. Sark has an area of two square miles. Sark was one of the last countries to abolish feudalism. Sark is a Scottish word meaning shirt (see Cutty Sark). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sark. ... Locator map for Guernsey. ... This article is about the British dependencies. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2211x1458, 1581 KB) An aerial view of Sark. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A regional language is a language spoken in a part of a country, be it may be a small area, a federal state or province, or a wider area. ... Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... The Seigneur of Sark is the head of the feudal government of the Isle of Sark. ... John Michael Beaumont (1927-) is Seigneur of Sark. ... The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guersey are situated in the English Channel to the west of the Cotentin Crown dependencies are possessions of The Crown in Right of the United Kingdom, as opposed to... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Hellier de Carteret was Seigneur of Sark from 1563 to 1578. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... GBP redirects here. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .gg is the country code top-level domain for Guernsey. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... This is a trivia section. ... +44 redirects here. ... The Guernsey pound (currency code GGP) is the currency used in Guernsey. ... Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... This article is about the British dependencies. ... A bailiwick is the area of jurisdiction of a bailiff. ... Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ... Catherine IIs carved, painted and gilded Coronation Coach (Hermitage Museum) George VI and Queen Elizabeth in a landau with footmen and an outrider, Canada 1939 The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs (elliptical springs in the 19th century... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that moped be merged into this article or section. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the early modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the...

Contents

Geography

Trident VI at Maseline Harbour
Trident VI at Maseline Harbour

Sark consists of two main parts, Greater Sark and Little Sark to the south. They are connected by a narrow isthmus called La Coupée which is just nine feet (3 m) wide with a drop of 300 feet (91 m) on either side. Protective railings were erected in 1900; before then, children would crawl across on their hands and knees to avoid being blown over the edge. There is a narrow concrete road covering the entirety of the isthmus, built in 1945 by German prisoners of war under the direction of the Royal Engineers. For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ...


The highest point on Sark is 374 feet (114 m) above sea-level. A windmill, dated 1571 is found here, the sails of which were removed by the Germans during their occupation in World War II. This location is also the highest point in the Bailiwick of Guernsey. Little Sark had a number of mines; as well as a source of galena,[1] at Port Gorey, the ruins of silver mines[2] can still be seen. Just off the south end of Little Sark is the "Venus Pool", a natural swimming pool, and the "Adonis Pool". For other uses, see Galena (disambiguation). ...


The island of Brecqhou is also under the jurisdiction of Sark, only a few hundred feet west of Greater Sark. It is a private island that is not open to visitors. Since 1993 the tenement of Brecqhou has been owned by David Barclay, one of the Barclay brothers, identical twins, who are better known as co-owners of The Daily Telegraph. They contest Sark's control over the island. This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... A private island is a privately owned island. ... Sir David and Sir Frederick Barclay (both born 27 October 1934) are British businessmen. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ...


Politics

Sark was previously considered the last feudal state in Europe,[3] as fiefdom existed until April 2008. Fiefdom was abolished by the amending of electoral laws to grant universal suffrage and fully elected governance. Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the early modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Fief depiction in a book of hours Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud, feoff, or fee, often consisted of inheritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord, generally to a vassal, in return for a form of allegiance, originally to give him the means...


Seigneur

The Seigneurie
The Seigneurie

The Seigneur of Sark was, prior to the constitutional reforms of 2008, the head of the feudal government of the Isle of Sark (in the case of a woman, the title was Dame). From 1980 John Michael Beaumont has been the twenty-second Seigneur of Sark. Many of the laws, particularly those related to inheritance and the rule of the Seigneur, changed little since they were enacted in 1565 under Queen Elizabeth I. The Seigneur retained the sole right on the island to keep pigeons and was the only person allowed to keep an unspayed female dog.[4][5] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (727x962, 556 KB) Seigneurie op Sark. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (727x962, 556 KB) Seigneurie op Sark. ... The Seigneur of Sark is the head of the feudal government of the Isle of Sark. ... John Michael Beaumont (1927-) is Seigneur of Sark. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


Tenants

In Sark, the word tenant is used (and often pronounced as in French) in the sense of feudal landholder rather than the common English meaning of lessee. The landholdings of Sark are held by 40 tenants representing the parcels of the 40 families who colonised Sark. As explained on the Sark government website: "There is no true freehold, all land being held on perpetual lease (fief) from the Seigneur, and the 40 properties (Tenements) into which the Island is divided (as well as a few other holdings in perpetual fief) can only pass by strict rules of inheritance or by sale. The Island was originally divided into forty landholdings known as Tenements and the owner or Tenant has, by right, a seat in Chief Pleas. Over the years further Seigneurial land has been leased in small parcels in perpetuity in similar manner to the Tenements but usually without the obligation to hold arms (La Fregondée is one exception) and without a seat in Chief Pleas. These properties are frequently but erroneously referred to as "freeholds" to distinguish them from the Tenements."[4]


Chief Pleas

La Coupée is the narrow isthmus which links Greater and Little Sark
La Coupée is the narrow isthmus which links Greater and Little Sark

Chief Pleas (French: Chefs Plaids; Sercquiais: Cheurs Pliaids) is the parliament of Sark. Today Chief Pleas consists of the 40 Tenants plus 12 Deputies of the People (elected by universal adult suffrage for a mandate of three years). Image File history File links Sark_La_Coupee. ... Image File history File links Sark_La_Coupee. ...


The Seigneur and the Seneschal (who presides) are also members of Chief Pleas. The Prévôt, the Greffier, and the Treasurer also attend but are not members; the Treasurer may address Chief Pleas on matters of taxation and finance. A seneschal was an officer in the houses of important nobles in the Middle Ages. ... Look up provost in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A provost (introduced into Scots from French) was the leader of a Scottish burgh council, the equivalent of a mayor in other parts of the English-speaking world. ... A secretary is an administrative support position. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The executive officers on the island are

  • The Seneschal (President of Chief Pleas and Chief Judge) and the Deputy Seneschal
  • The Prevôt (Sheriff of the Court and of Chief Pleas) and the Deputy Prevôt
  • The Greffier (Clerk) and the Deputy Greffier
  • The Treasurer (Finances)
  • The Constable (the senior policeman and administration) and the Vingtenier (the junior policeman)

Seneschal, Prevôt, Greffier and Treasurer are chosen by the Seigneur, Constable and Vingtenier are elected by Chief Pleas. For the painter, see John Constable. ... In Jersey, a Vingtenier is a member of the Honorary Police elected by a Parish Assembly of electors and ratepayers for a term of three years for a particular vingtaine (or, in St. ...


Since 2000, Chief Pleas has been working on its own reform, responding to internal and international pressures. On 8 March 2006 by a vote of 25–15 Chief Pleas voted for a new legislature of the Seigneur, the Seneschal, 14 elected landowners and 14 elected non-landowners.[6] Not everyone favoured the changes: many people wanted to keep feudalism completely.[citation needed] But it was made plain that this option was not on the table. Offered two options for reform involving a fully elected legislature, one with three, and one with a single class of seats, 56% of the inhabitants expressed a preference in an opinion poll for the simpler option.[citation needed][7] Following the poll, Chief Pleas voted on 4 October 2006 to replace the 12 Deputies and 40 Tenants in Chief Pleas by 28 Conseillers elected by universal adult suffrage.[8] This decision was suspended in January 2007 when it was pointed out to Chief Pleas that the 56% versus 44% majority achieved in the opinion poll did not achieve the 20% majority required for the constitutional change. The decision was replaced by the proposal that Chief Pleas should consist of 16 Tenants and 12 Conseillers both elected by universal adult suffrage from 2008-2012 and that a binding referendum should then decide whether this composition should be kept or replaced by 28 Conseillers.[9] This proposal was rejected by the Privy Council and the 28 Conseiller option was reinstated in February 2008. is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2003, Chief Pleas voted to vary the longstanding ban on divorce in the island by extending to the Royal Court of Guernsey power to grant divorces.[citation needed] A ban is, generally, any decree that prohibits something. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ...


History

A horse-drawn carriage on Sark
A horse-drawn carriage on Sark
Sark in relation to the other Channel Islands, and France
Sark in relation to the other Channel Islands, and France

In the thirteenth century, Sark was used as a base of operations by the French pirate Eustace the Monk after he served King John of England. Although populated by monastic communities in the mediaeval period, Sark was uninhabited in the 16th century and used as a refuge and raiding base by Channel pirates. Helier de Carteret, Seigneur of St. Ouen in Jersey, received a charter from Queen Elizabeth I to colonise Sark with 40 families from St. Ouen on condition that he maintain the island free of pirates. This article is about the British dependencies. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Eustace the Monk (c. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos — a solitary person) is the religious practice in which one renounces worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... Hellier de Carteret was Seigneur of Sark from 1563 to 1578. ... Ruins of Grosnez Castle Saint Ouen (Jèrriais: St Ouën) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ... Ruins of Grosnez Castle Saint Ouen (Jèrriais: St Ouën) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. ...


An attempt by the newly settled families to endow themselves with a constitution under a bailiff, as in Jersey, was put down by the authorities of Guernsey who resented any attempt to wrest Sark from their bailiwick.[citation needed] In the Channel Islands of Guernsey the Bailiff is the first civil officer, serving as president of the legislature and the Royal Court. ...


During World War II, the island was occupied by the Germans from 1940–1945, as were the other Channel Islands, and was the site of Operation Basalt. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... As part of the Atlantic Wall, between 1940 and 1945 the occupying German forces and the Organisation Todt constructed fortifications round the coasts of the Channel Islands such as this observation tower at Les Landes, Jersey The Occupation of the Channel Islands refers to the Military occupation of the Channel... This article is about the British dependencies. ... During World War II, Operation Basalt was a small raid on the German occupied British Channel Island of Sark, on the night of 3/4 October, 1942. ...


Recent history

One-man invasion attempt

In 1991 an unemployed French nuclear physicist named André Gardes attempted a singlehanded invasion of Sark, armed with a semi-automatic weapon. He was arrested by the Island's police officer (who at the time was Little Sark farmer Philip Perrée Junior) while Gardes was sitting on a bench, changing the gun's magazine.[5] Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ... A semi-automatic firearm automatically loads a round into the chamber after the weapon is fired, but still requires a trigger pull for each round that is fired. ...


Transition to democracy

On 4 July 2007 Sark began to dismantle its feudal system to comply with the European Convention on Human Rights. The majority of the island's legislature could be elected by 2009.[10] On January 16, 2008 and February 21, 2008, the Chief Pleas approved a law which introduces a 30-member chamber, with 28 elected members and retaining only two unelected members. On 9 April 2008, the Privy Council approved the Sark law reforms,[11] and the first elections under the new law will be held in December 2008 and the new chamber will first convene in January 2009.[12][13][14] is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... “ECHR” redirects here. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ...


Sercquiais

Sercquiais (Sarkese, or sometimes called Sark-French) is a dialect of the Norman language still spoken by older inhabitants of the island.[15] Its use has declined in recent years due to a large influx of people who have moved to Sark,[16] and the ongoing anglicisation of the island. Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... Norman is a Romance language and one of the Oïl languages. ...


Education

Sark has one school, the Sark School, which takes residents from the ages of 5 to 15.[17] Pupils wishing to obtain a GCSE or A-level qualification usually finish their education in Guernsey or Jersey. Students may also enroll in United Kingdom boarding schools. “GCSE” redirects here. ...


Religion

St. Peter's Anglican church
St. Peter's Anglican church

Sark has an Anglican church (St. Peter's, built 1820) and a Methodist[18] church. John Wesley first proposed a mission to Sark in 1787. Jean de Quetteville of Jersey subsequently began preaching there, initially in a cottage at Le Clos à Geon and then at various houses around Sark. Preachers from Guernsey visited regularly, and in 1796, land was donated by Jean Vaudin, leader of the Methodist community in Sark, for the construction of a chapel, which Jean de Quetteville dedicated in 1797.[19] In the mid-1800s there was a small Plymouth Brethren assembly. Its most notable member was the classicist William Kelly (1821-1906). Kelly was then the tutor to the Seigneur's children. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... The Brethren are a Christian Evangelical movement that began in Dublin, London, Plymouth, and the continent of Europe in the late 1820s. ... William Kelly 1821- March 27, 1906 was born in Millisle, Ulster. ...


Supported by the evidence of the names of the tenements of La Moinerie and La Moinerie de Haut, it is believed[20] that the Seigneurie was constructed on the site of the monastery of Saint Magloire. Magloire had been Samson of Dol's successor as bishop of Dol, but retired and founded a monastery in Sark where he died in the late 6th century. According to the vita of Magloire, the monastery housed 62 monks and a school for the instruction of the sons of noble families from the Cotentin. Magloire's relics were venerated at the monastery until the mid-9th century when Viking raids rendered Sark unsafe and the monks departed for Jersey, taking the relics with them. This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Samson of Dol (born 486?) was a Christian religious figure of the fifth century. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... A Dol is a little-used unit of measurement for pain. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... The Cotentin Peninsula juts out into the English Channel from Normandy towards England, forming part of the north-west coast of France. ... For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ...


Clameur de Haro

Among the old laws of the Channel Islands is the old Norman custom of the Clameur de Haro. Using this legal device, a person can obtain immediate cessation of any action he considers to be an infringement of his rights. At the scene, he must, in front of witnesses, recite the Lord's Prayer in French and cry out "Haro, Haro, Haro! À mon aide mon Prince, on me fait tort!"[4] ("Haro, Haro, Haro! To my aid, my Prince! One does me wrong!") It should then be registered with the Greffe Office within 24 hours. All actions against the person must then cease until the matter is heard by the Court. The last Clameur recorded on Sark was raised in June 1970 to prevent the construction of a garden wall.[5] Norman conquests in red. ... The Clameur De Haro is an ancient legal injunction of restraint employed by a person that believes they are being wronged by another at that moment. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Galena from Le Pelley's Shaft, Little Sark, Channel Islands
  2. ^ Sark (Channel Islands
  3. ^ www.lonelyplanet.com/theme/islands/islands_sark.htm.
  4. ^ a b c Sark GovernmentLaw and Custom
  5. ^ a b c Lost world: the last days of feudal Sark. The Independent (2006-10-26). Retrieved on 2008-02-22.
  6. ^ Minutes EXTRAORDINARY MEETING of the Chief Pleas held on the 8th day of March, 2006 (pdf) 8. Retrieved on 2008-02-21. “Proposition 1”
  7. ^ ISLAND OF SARK – TEST OF OPINION ON COMPOSITION OF THE CHIEF PLEAS (pdf) (2006-09-07). Retrieved on 2008-02-21. “for 28 Open Seats...234 ... for 12 Seats for Deputies, 8 Seats for Tenants, 8 Open Seats...184”
  8. ^ Minutes of the meeting held in the Assembly Room, Sark on 4 October 2006 (pdf) 3. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  9. ^ MINUTES of the EASTER MEETING of CHIEF PLEAS Held in the Assembly Room, Sark on 11–12 April 2007 (pdf) 4,7,13. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  10. ^ Democratic Revolution, The Economist, July 14July 20, 2007
  11. ^ Sark democracy plans are approved, BBC News Online, 9 April 2008
  12. ^ A Revolution Not Televised, Time.com, January 17, 2008
  13. ^ After 443 years, Sark gets democracy, The Bugle, Episode 13, January 2008. The Bugle is a satirical podcast of the Times Online.
  14. ^ Sark agrees switch to democracy, BBC News Online, 22 February 2008
  15. ^ Dr Mari C Jones. BBC - Voices - Multilingual Nation / Jèrriais and Sercquiais today. Retrieved on 2008-02-21. “1998 it was estimated that, at that time, fewer than 20 out of the Island's 600 permanent inhabitants (3.3%) were still able to speak Sercquiais”
  16. ^ BBC - Voices - Multilingual Nation. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  17. ^ Sark Tourism - Isle of Sark, Channel Islands / General Information. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  18. ^ Sark Methodist Church.
  19. ^ Methodism in the Channel Islands, Moore, London, 1952
  20. ^ Channel island Churches, McCormack, 1986 ISBN 0850335418
  • ^Law and Custom  Isle of Sark, Channel Islands / Government. sark.info. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  • John Sack. Report from Practically Nowhere, 1959 ISBN 0-595-08918-6

For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

See also

The Seigneur of Sark is the head of the feudal government of the Isle of Sark. ... First international Sark 0 - 19 Gibraltar (Guernsey; 29 June 2003) Largest win None Worst defeat Sark 0 - 20 Isle of Wight (Guernsey; 30 June 2003) Appearances - (First in -) Best result - The Sark national football team represents the Channel Island of Sark. ...

External links

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Coordinates: 49°25′59″N 2°21′39″W / 49.43306, -2.36083 Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

This article is about the British dependencies. ... The Écréhous (or Les Écréhous; in Jèrriais: Êcrého) are a groups of islands and rocks situated 6 miles north-east of Jersey (8 miles from France). ... The Minquiers (Les Minquiers; in Jèrriais: Les Mîntchièrs; nicknamed the Minkies in local English) are a group of islands and rocks situated 9 miles south of Jersey forming part of the Bailiwick of Jersey. ... The Pierres de Lecq (or Paternosters) at high tide seen from Jersey looking towards Sark. ... Les Dirouilles (Jèrriais: Les Dithouïlyes) are a range of rocks to the North-East of Jersey. ... Capital St Anne Status Part of Guernsey, Crown dependency of the UK Official language(s) English Head of Government Sir Norman Browse Population 2,400 Currency Pound sterling (GBP). ... This article is about the island. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... Ortac is a small uninhabited islet about 5 km West of the coast of Alderney near to the islet of Burhou. ... The Casquets (49° 43. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... Lihou is a small tidal island (95 vergees; 7ha) that is part of the Channel Islands. ... Crevichon is an islet off Herm in the Channel Islands According to Dr S.K. Kellett-Smith, it means isle of crabs, crayfish or cranes. Like other names in the region it is Norman in origin. ... Houmet redirects here, for further information on the placename element, please see -hou Les Houmets are to the east of Guernsey in the Channel Islands. ...

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Sark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (787 words)
Sark (in French, Sercq, in Sercquiais Sèr) is a small island of the Channel Islands, part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey.
The Seigneur of Sark is the head of the feudal government of the Isle of Sark.
Although populated by monastic communities in the mediaeval period, Sark was uninhabited in the 16th century and used as a refuge and raiding base by Channel pirates.
GENUKI:Sark (929 words)
The history of Sark (or, as in the old records, Sercq and Cercq) is necessarily much broken, as at different periods the island was for centuries uninhabited.
There are four shafts in the mine, varying from 360 to 600 feet in depth; there are eight galleries, three of which are extended on the course of the vein horizontally 3,600 feet, and one is driven 300 feet under the sea.
BRECHNOU is a small Island dependent on the lordship of Sark, 1 mile in circumference, and with two families settled on it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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