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Encyclopedia > Sardinia
Sardinia
Satellite image
Sos Battor Moros ("The Four Moors")
Geography
Status Autonomous region
Capital Cagliari
President Renato Soru
(Independent-Union)
Provinces Cagliari
Carbonia-Iglesias
Medio Campidano
Nuoro
Ogliastra
Olbia-Tempio
Oristano
Sassari
Area 24,090 km²
 - Ranked 3rd (8.0 %)
Population (2006 est.)
 - Total 1,655,677
 - Ranked 11th (2.8 %)
 - Density 69/km²

Sardinia (pronounced /sɑrˈdɪnɪə/; Italian: Sardegna; Sardinian: 'Sardigna' or Sardinnya) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). The area of Sardinia is 24,090 square kilometres (9,301 sq mi). The island is surrounded (clockwise from north) by the French island of Corsica, the Italian Peninsula, Tunisia and the Spanish Balearic Islands. Sardinia is a constitutional part of Italy, with a special statute of regional autonomy under the Italian Constitution. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x700, 44 KB) Summary Description: Credit Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC The island of Sardinia sits between the Mediterranean Sea to the south and west and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the east. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sardinia. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Article 116 of the Italian Constitution contemplates that five of the 20 Italian regions shall benefit of particular conditions of autonomy. ... Carales redirects here. ... Renato Soru (born 16 August 1957 in Sanluri, Sardinia-Italy) is the founder of the internet service company Tiscali, based in Cagliari. ... The Union (Italian: LUnione) is an Italian centre-left political party coalition. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Cagliari (It. ... Carbonia-Iglesias is the name of a proposed new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law No. ... Medio Campidano is the name of a new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law No. ... Nuoro (It. ... Ogliastra is a geographical and cultural region in eastern Sardinia, Italy. ... Olbia-Tempio is the name of a new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law no. ... Oristano (It. ... Sassari (It. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a list of islands in the Mediterranean Sea: // This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ... Satellite view of the Peninsula in spring The Italian Peninsula or Apennine Peninsula (Italian: Penisola italiana or Penisola appenninica) is one of the greatest peninsulas of Europe, spanning 1,000 km from the Alps in the north to the central Mediterranean Sea in the south. ... Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ... The Constitution of the Italian Republic (Italian, trans. ...


Around the beginning of the nuragic age circa 1500 BC the island was first called Hyknusa (Latinized Ichnusa) by the Mycenaeans, probably meaning island (nusa) of the Hyksos, the people who had just been expelled by Ahmose I of Egypt circa 1540 BC. Sandalyon was another name, probably due to its shape, resembling a footprint. Its present name is Sardinia, after the Shardana (whose invasion of Egypt was defeated by Ramesses III circa 1180 BC). Su Nuraxi, Barumini, Sardinia Central tower of the Nuraghe at Saint Antine of Torralba Su Nurraxi. ... (Redirected from 1500 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC - 1500s BC - 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC Events and Trends Stonehenge built in Wiltshire, England The element Mercury has been... This article is about the Greek archaeological site. ... An image representing the Egyptian pharaoh Ahmose I defeating the Hyksos in battle. ... Nebpehtire[4] The Lord of Strength is Re Nomen Ahmose[3] The Moon is Born Horus name Aakheperu[5] Great of Developments[6] Nebty name Tutmesut[5] Perfect of Birth[6] Golden Horus Tjestawy[5] He who Knots Together the Two Lands[6] Consort(s) Ahmose-Nefertari Gods Wife... (Redirected from 1540 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1590s BC 1580s BC 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC - 1540s BC - 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC 1500s BC 1490s BC Events and Trends History of ancient Israel and Judah - earliest date for Amhose... The Shardana or Sherden sea pirates are one of several groups of Sea Peoples who appear in fragmentary historical records (Egyptian inscriptions) for the Mediterranean region in the second millennium B.C.; little is known about them. ... Nomen: Ramesse Hekaiunu Ra bore him, Ruler of Heliopolis Consort(s) Iset Ta-Hemdjert, Tiye Children Ramesses IV, Ramesses VI, Ramesses VIII, Amun-her-khepeshef, Khaemwaset, Meryamun, Meryatum, Montuherkhopshef, Pentawere, Duatentopet (?) Father Setnakht Mother Tiy-Merenese Died 1155 BC Burial KV11 Monuments Medinet Habu Usimare Ramesses III (also written Ramses... (Redirected from 1180 BC) Centuries: 13th century BC - 12th century BC - 11th century BC Decades: 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC 1200s BC 1190s BC - 1180s BC - 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC 1140s BC 1130s BC Events and Trends April 24 1184 BC - Traditional date of the fall of...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Sardinia

Sardinia has been inhabited for many thousands of years. In 1979 human remains were found that were dated to the 150,000 BC. In 2004, in a cave in Logudoro, a human phalanx was found that was dated to ~250,000 BC. The History of Sardinia covers several millennia of civilization of this Mediterranean isle. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ...


In prehistory the inhabitants of Sardinia developed a trade in obsidian, a volcanic glass used for the production of stone age tools, and this activity brought Sardinians into contact with most of the Mediterranean people. Dried grapes, recently found in several locations, have been DNA tested and proved to be the oldest grapes in the world, dating back to 1200 BC. The Cannonau wine is made from these grapes and may therefore qualify as the mother of all the European wines. Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... This article is about a type of volcanic glass. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ...

Lagoon Beach
Lagoon Beach

From Neolithic times until the Roman Empire, the Nuragic civilisation developed on the island. There are still more than 9,000 Nuraghe extant. It is speculated that, along with other peoples, the Shardana people from the eastern Mediterranean settled in Sardinia. The Shardana had joined the Shekelesh and others to form the coalition of the Sea Peoples, but were defeated by Ramesses III around 1180 BC in Egypt. The Shardana and Shekelesh were also called by the Egyptians "the people from the faraway islands", suggesting that the Shardana were already resident on Sardinia at the time. This assertion may hold some truth; most of the tombe dei giganti have a tombstone shaped like a ship vertically sunk into the ground, bearing witness to their sea traveling activities. According to some linguistic studies, the town of Sardis (in Lydia) would have been the starting point from which they would have reached the Tyrrhenian Sea, dividing into what were to become the Sardinians and the Etruscans. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... History of Sardinia Prehistory In 1979 human remains were found that were dated 150,000 BC. Following retrievals are of about 15,000 BC. It is supposed ancient Sardinians descend from a mysterious people: Shardana. ... Su Nuraxi, Barumini, Sardinia Central tower of the Nuraghe at Saint Antine of Torralba Su Nurraxi. ... The Shardana or Sherden sea pirates are one of several groups of Sea Peoples who appear in fragmentary historical records (Egyptian inscriptions) for the Mediterranean region in the second millennium B.C.; little is known about them. ... Sea Peoples is the term used in ancient Egyptian records of a race of ship-faring raiders who drifted into the eastern shores of the Mediterranean and attempted to enter Egyptian territory during the late 19th dynasty, and especially year 5 of Rameses III of the 20th Dynasty. ... The Budgie People is the term used for a confederacy of seafaring raiders who sailed into the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, caused political unrest, and attempted to enter or control Egyptian territory during the late 19th dynasty, and especially during Year 8 of Ramesses III of the 20th Dynasty. ... Nomen: Ramesse Hekaiunu Ra bore him, Ruler of Heliopolis Consort(s) Iset Ta-Hemdjert, Tiye Children Ramesses IV, Ramesses VI, Ramesses VIII, Amun-her-khepeshef, Khaemwaset, Meryamun, Meryatum, Montuherkhopshef, Pentawere, Duatentopet (?) Father Setnakht Mother Tiy-Merenese Died 1155 BC Burial KV11 Monuments Medinet Habu Usimare Ramesses III (also written Ramses... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A recent view of the ceremonial court of the thermae–gymnasium complex in Sardis, dated to 211—212 AD Sardis, also Sardes (Lydian: Sfard, Greek: Σάρδεις, Persian: Sparda), modern Sart in the Manisa province of Turkey, was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a proconsul under... Lydia (Greek ) is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ...


However most theories regarding the original population of Sardinia were formulated prior to genetics research and in the traditional framework of east-west movements. Genetic studies show that the population of Sardinia is genetically quite distant from their neighbors. This is partially due to genetic drift due to isolation, though other reasons, such as ties with pre-Indo-European Neolithic peoples may also have contributed to this distance. In population genetics, genetic drift is the statistical effect that results from the influence that chance has on the success of alleles (variants of a gene). ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BCE Europe in ca. ...


The density, extensiveness, and sheer size of the architectural remains from the Neolithic period all point to a considerable population of the island. Early contact with Crete is indicated from archaeological recovery on Sardinia. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ...

Beginning around 1000 BC, Phoenician mariners established several ports of trade on the Sardinian coast. In 509 BC, war broke out between the native Nuragic people and the Phoenician settlers. The settlers called for help from Carthage (themselves ultimately Phoenician settlers), and the island became a province in the Carthaginian Empire. In 238 BC, after being defeated by the Roman Republic in the First Punic War, Carthage was forced to fight an uprising against former mercenaries who had not received their promised pay in a conflict known as the Mercenary War. Rome jumped at this opportunity to annex Corsica and Sardinia without resistance from the overstretched Carthaginians. Country Italy Region Sardinia Province Province of Sassari (SS) Mayor Elevation m Area 58. ... (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC - 230s BC - 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC Years: 243 BC 242 BC 241 BC 240 BC 239 BC - 238 BC - 237 BC 236 BC... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Osama was here and he doesnt enjoy this site???? the red sox won and i am one happy camper. ... The Mercenary War was a uprising of mercenaries in the employ of Carthage in the 3rd century BC. The revolt was a consequence of delays in payment following the defeat of Carthage in the First Punic War. ... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ...

The medieval giudicati.
The medieval giudicati.

During the Roman period, the geographer Ptolemy noted that Sardinia was inhabited by the following peoples, from north to south: the Tibulati and the Corsi, the Coracenses, the Carenses and the Cunusitani, the Salcitani and the Lucuidonenses, the Æsaronenses, the Æchilenenses (also called Cornenses), the Rucensi, the Celsitani and the Corpicenses, the Scapitani and the Siculensi, the Neapolitani and the Valentini, as well as the Solcitani and the Noritani. Ptol. III, 3. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... The Tibulati (Greek: ), also called Tibulates and Tibulatii, were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Corsi were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Coracenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Carenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Cunusitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Salcitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Lucuidonenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Æsaronenses or Aesaronenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Æchilenenses also called the Cornenses and Æchilenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Rucensi were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Celsitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Corpicenses were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Scapitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Siculensi were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Neapolitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... An 18th-century caricature of Urbani. ... The Solcitani also called the Sulcitani were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ... The Noritani also called Norenses the were an ancient people of Sardinia, noted by Ptolemy (III, 3). ...


From 456 - 534, Sardinia was a part of the short-lived kingdom of the Vandals in North Africa, until it was reconquered by the Byzantine emperor Justinian I. During this time a considerable number of Vandals and Iranian Alans settled on the island with significant traces of their Haplogroup I (Y-DNA) there to this day. Under the Byzantines, the imperial representative was a judge who governed from the southern city of Caralis. Byzantine rule was practically nonexistent in the mountainous Barbagia region in the eastern part of the island, and an independent kingdom persisted there from the sixth through ninth centuries. Capua is destroyed by the Vandals. ... Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... The Alans, Alani, Alauni or Halani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of varied backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and to a large extent shared a common culture. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup I (M170, P19, M258) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup. ... Càgliari is the capital of the island of Sardinia, an autonomous region of Italy. ... Barbagia is an area of inner Sardinia. ...


Beginning in the eighth century, Arabs and Berbers began raiding Sardinia. After the Muslim conquest of Sicily in 832, the Byzantines were unable to effectively defend their most distant province, and the provincial judge assumed independent authority. To provide for local defense, he divided the island into four giudicati, Gallura, Logudoro, Arborea, and Caralis. By 900, these districts had become four independent constitutional monarchies. At various times, these fell under the sway of Genoa and Pisa. In 1323, the Kingdom of Aragon began a campaign to conquer Sardinia. The giudicato of Arborea successfully resisted this and for a time came to control nearly the entire island, but its last ruler William III of Narbonne, was eventually defeated by the Aragonese in the decisive Battle of Sanluri, June 30, 1409. The native population of the city of Alghero (S'Alighera in Sardinian, L'Alguer in Catalan) was expelled and the city repopulated by the Catalan invaders, whose descendants still speak Catalan. After the merging of the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon, Sardinia was incorporated into the newly created national entity, Spain. The town of Sassari proclaimed itself a free Republic, allied to Genoa, in 1290. For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Language(s) Berber languages Religion(s) Islam (mostly Sunni), Christianity (mostly protestant), Judaism Imazighen(in Kabyle and other Berber languages: Imaziγen) are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Events Theophilus forbids the usage of icons, establishing strict punishments. ... Giudicati were Sardinian medieval autochtonous regions which existed from about 900 AD. Originally they were Byzantine districts that became independent during the Arab war against Byzantium. ... Gallura (locally Gaddura) is a geographical and cultural region in northern Sardinia, Italy. ... Logudoro/Torres is an historical region of Sardinia, placed on the north-west portion of the island. ... The Giudicati of Sardinia. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... August 12 - The Treaty of Nöteborg between Sweden and Novgorod (Russia) is signed, regulating the border for the first time Canonization of Saint Thomas Aquinas Lithuania: in Letters of Gediminas, Vilnius is named as the capital city Pharos of Alexandria Lighthouse (one of the Seven Wonders of the world... Coat of arms The Kingdom of Aragon at its greatest extent, c. ... The coat of arms of William. ... The Battle of Sanluri was fought on June 30, 1409 between the armies of the Giudicato of Arborea (a kingdom in Sardinia) and the Catalan-Sicilian army of King Martin I of Sicily. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - The Welsh surrender Harlech Castle to the English. ... Alghero (lAlguer in Catalan and SAlighèra in Sardinian), is a town of about 42,000 inhabitants (down from 54,300 inhabitants since early 20th century) in Italy. ... Alguerese or Algherese is the variant of the Catalan language spoken in the city of Alghero, in the northwest of Sardinia. ... Sassari (in Italian and Sassarese, a Corsican dialect; either Sassari or Tathari in southern Sardinian), is a town and a province in Sardinia, Italy. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ...


Under Spain, Sardinians were regularly employed on the royal Spanish fleet. On October 7 in 1571, at the Battle of Lepanto, Sardinian mariners on board the admiral ship of Infante Don John of Austria, half brother of Felipe II, boarded the Turkish admiral ship, overpowered the crew, and beheaded a Turkish admiral[citation needed]. The sight of the admiral's head on a spear put such fear into the Turks that they abandoned the fight and surrendered completely to the Christians. This was the first time that the Turks lost a battle to Europeans, thus signaling a trend of military decline and defeats from which Turks never recovered. is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... // Combatants Holy League: Spain  Republic of Venice Papal States Republic of Genoa Duchy of Savoy Knights of Malta Ottoman Empire Commanders Don John of Austria Ali Pasha † Strength 206 galleys, 6 galleasses 230 galleys, 56 galliots Casualties 8,000 dead or wounded, 12 galleys lost 20,000 dead or wounded... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... The tomb of Don Juan de Austria in San Lorenzo de El Escorial Don John of Austria (February 24, 1547 - October 1, 1578), also known as Juan de Austria and Don Juan de Austria, was an illegitimate son of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Felipe II is the name of two Spanish kings who ruled also over Portugal: Philip II of Spain (the I of Portugal) and Philip II of Portugal (the III of Spain). ...

Cagliari, the administrative centre and largest city.
Cagliari, the administrative centre and largest city.

In 1718 Sardinia became an 'independent' vassal kingdom under the House of Savoy, the rulers of Piedmont. Image File history File linksMetadata Cagliari_Panorama. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cagliari_Panorama. ... Carales redirects here. ... Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ...


In 1792, Jean-Paul Marat, son of a Sardinian father from Cagliari and a Swiss mother, was one of the triumvirate leading the French Revolution. In 1793, Sardinians rebelled, demanding autonomy in exchange for helping to defeat French invasion forces. Autonomy was granted within the united kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, but after the French threat to the kingdom lessened, the king reclaimed his authority. 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Marat redirects here. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont, with Savoia upper left (pink) and Nizza (Nice) lower left (brown) both now French, and Sardinia in the inset The Kingdom of Sardinia is a former kingdom in Italy. ...


In 1860, Vittorio Emanuele II, King of Sardinia became also the first King of a united Italy, after conquering the rest of the peninsula. 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy Victor Emmanuel II (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele II; March 14, 1820—January 9, 1878) was the King of Piedmont, Savoy and Sardinia from 1849–1861, and King of Italy from 1861 until his death in 1878. ... The House of Savoy was a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region between Piedmont, Italy, France and French-speaking Switzerland. ... Italian Unification (Italian: il Risorgimento, or The Resurgence) was the political and social movement that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ...


The political theorist Antonio Gramsci is arguably Sardinia's most famous native son, and was born in Ales on January 22, 1891. Antonio Gramsci (IPA: ) (January 22, 1891 – April 27, 1937) was an Italian writer, politician and political theorist. ... Ales is a small town in the province of Oristano on the island of Sardinia in the Mediterranean_Sea. ...


Genetics

The original Nuraghe inhabitants of Sardinia, who are now concentrated in the interior of the island due to pressure from colonists, are a genetic anomaly[citation needed] in the region. They belong to Y-chromosome haplogroup I, which otherwise has high frequency only in Scandinavia and the Croatia-Bosnia area. Su Nuraxi, Barumini, Sardinia Central tower of the Nuraghe at Saint Antine of Torralba Su Nurraxi. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup I (M170, P19, M258) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


Furthermore, the I haplogroup of the indigenous Sardinians is of the I1b1b subtype, which is unique to the island. The I1b1b haplogroup also has a low distribution in and around the Pyrenees, indicating some migration of Sardinians to or from that area. The Sardinian subtype is more closely related to the Croatian-Bosnian subtype than to the Scandinavian subtype. Sardinia also has a relatively high distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroup G, stemming from people that migrated to Sardinia from Anatolia. The Y-chromosome haplogroup G also has a relatively high concentration in and around the Pyrenees, again indicating migration of Sardinians to or from that area. Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ... rofl like, theres this n00b caleld necRo on bladefist eu WoW and he like bosnian and should die lol rofl ol ... Haplogroup G (Y-DNA) is most frequent in the Caucasus (found at over 60% in ethnic North Ossetian males). ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ...


Geography and climate

Sardinia is separated from Corsica by the Strait of Bonifacio. For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ... The Strait of Bonifacio is the strait between Corsica and Sardinia. ...


Sardinia is a generally mountainous island with a few coastal plains. The island's mountains are divided into three ranges; the highest peaks are in the middle section of the island. Gennargentu, at 6,016 feet (1,834 m), is the highest point in Sardinia. Sardinia has few major rivers; the largest river on the island is the Tirso, which has a length of 94 miles (151 km) and flows into the Mediterranean Sea. The island has a Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and very mild winters. The climate in the mountains tends to be wetter and cooler than the lower coastal plains; and winter snowfalls are not uncommon in the higher peaks.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ...

Weather averages for Cagliari, Sardinia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 86 (30) 81 (27) 88 (31) 92 (33) 95 (35) 102 (39) 110 (43) 106 (41) 102 (39) 95 (35) 90 (32) 86 (30) 110 (43)
Average high °F (°C) 65 (18) 66 (18) 68 (20) 72 (22) 75 (24) 82 (28) 87 (30) 86 (30) 82 (28) 75 (24) 73 (22) 68 (20) 75 (24)
Average low °F (°C) 48 (9) 50 (10) 50 (11) 54 (12) 57 (14) 64 (18) 68 (20) 70 (21) 65 (18) 59 (15) 54 (12) 50 (10) 57 (14)
Record low °F (°C) 28 (-2) 32 (0) 38 (3) 41 (5) 43 (6) 52 (11) 59 (15) 59 (15) 52 (11) 39 (4) 38 (3) 32 (0) 28 (-2)
Precipitation inches (cm) 1.8 (5) 2.2 (6) 1.7 (4) 1.5 (4) 0.9 (2) 0.4 (1) 0.1 (0) 0.4 (1) 1.2 (3) 2.2 (6) 2.2 (6) 2.2 (5) 16.8 (43)
Source: {{{source}}} {{{accessdate}}}

Until 2006, Sardinia had been divided into four provinces:

Now Sardinia is divided into eight provinces, following the creation of four more provinces just recently by the Sardinian regional government, becoming operative with the provinces' elections for the Presidents and the Councils held in 2006. The four additional provinces are as follows: Cagliari (It. ... Nuoro (It. ... Oristano (It. ... Sassari (It. ...

Carbonia-Iglesias is the name of a proposed new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law No. ... Medio Campidano is the name of a new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law No. ... Ogliastra is a geographical and cultural region in eastern Sardinia, Italy. ... Olbia-Tempio is the name of a new province in the autonomous region of Sardinia, Italy (Regional Law no. ...

Culture

A Sardinian nuraghe
A Sardinian nuraghe

Sardinia is one of two Italian regions whose inhabitants have been recognized as a "popolo" (i.e. a distinct people) by a local Statute (which is adopted with a Constitutional Law). The other region is Veneto (but this is not a Constitutionl Law). Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Nuraghe Arrubio Source: eigene Fotografie Date:Oktober 2006 Photographer: Hans Peter Schaefer, http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Nuraghe Arrubio Source: eigene Fotografie Date:Oktober 2006 Photographer: Hans Peter Schaefer, http://www. ... Su Nuraxi, Barumini, Sardinia Central tower of the Nuraghe at Saint Antine of Torralba Su Nurraxi. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ...


Sardinia is one of the world's most interesting musical destinations. It is home to one of the oldest forms of Vocal Polyphony, generally known as Canto a Tenores; several big names of music have found it irresistible, including Frank Zappa, Ornette Coleman, and Peter Gabriel. The latter travelled to the town of Bitti in the central mountain region, and recorded the now world-famous Tenores di Bitti CD on his Realworld label. The guttural sounds produced in this form make a truly remarkable sound, similar to Tuvan (Mongolia) throat singing. Another polyphonic style of singing, more like the Corsican Paghjella and liturgic in nature, is also found in Sardinia and is known as Cantu a Cuncordu. Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Ornette Coleman (born March 9, 1930) is an American saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter and composer. ... Peter Brian Gabriel (born 13 February 1950, in Cobham,[1] Surrey, England) is an English musician. ...


Another unique instrument is the launeddas. See also Music of Sardinia. Three reed-canes (2 of them glued together with beeswax) producing distinctive harmonies, which have their roots many thousands of years ago, as demonstrated by the bronzette from Ittiri, of a man playing the 3 reed canes, dated to 2000 BC. The launeddas, triple clarinet or triplepipe is a typical Sardinian woodwind instrument, consisting of three pipes. ... Probably the most culturally distinct of all the regions in Italy, Sardinia is an islated island known for the tenores polyphonic chant, sacred songs called gozos and launeddas, a type of bagpipes. ... Country Italy Region Sardinia Province Province of Sassari (SS) Mayor Elevation 400 m Area 111. ...


Beyond this, the tradition of Cantos a Chiterra (guitar songs) has its origins in town squares, when artists would compete against one another. It lives on in new forms. Sardinian culture is alive and well, and young people are actively involved in their own music and dancing.


However, the new generation of Sardinian artists are a force to be reckoned with. Sardinia has produced some of the best jazz musicians in Europe (see Paolo Fresu). Of these, singer Elena Ledda stands out as the precursor and most widely acknowledged performer of the renewed tradition. In 2004, legendary BBC presenter Andy Kershaw (presented Live Aid in 1985), travelled to the island with Sardinian music specialist Pablo Farba, and interviewed many artists. His programme can be heard on BBC Radio 3 Paolo Fresu is a trumpet and flugelhorn jazz player born in Berchidda, Sardinia, on February 10th, 1961, and an arranger and a music composer. ... Elenea Ledda Sardinian singer. ... Andy Kershaw Andy Kershaw (born November 9, 1959 in Rochdale, Greater Manchester) is a British broadcaster, known predominantly as a champion of world music. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ...

A no-smoking sign in both Sardinian (which reads "You can not smoke") and Italian (which reads "It is forbidden to smoke").
A no-smoking sign in both Sardinian (which reads "You can not smoke") and Italian (which reads "It is forbidden to smoke").

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2287x1512, 285 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sardinia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2287x1512, 285 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sardinia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Language

Main article: Sardinian language

The most spoken language in Sardinia is, undoubtedly, Italian, but Sardinian is widely spoken too. Sardinian is a Romance language of Latin origin, but with an obscure Pre-Roman element, including Phoenician, Etruscan, and Near Eastern languages. While it has been significantly supplanted by Italian for official purposes, Sardinian is still widely spoken in most rural parts and, stemming from a long history of oral tradition, is used culturally for folk songs and poetry. As a literary language, it is gaining clout, despite heated debate about the lack of standard orthography and controversial proposed solutions to this problem. Recently, the regional administration has approved the use of Limba Sarda Comuna [1] in official documents. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phoenician was a language originally spoken in the coastal region then called PÅ«t in Ancient Egyptian, Canaan in Phoenician, Hebrew and Aramaic, and Phoenicia in Greek and Latin. ... Languages in Iron Age Italy, 6th century BC Etruscan was a language spoken and written in the ancient region of Etruria (current Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of what are now Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls), in Italy. ...

Grazia Deledda, Nobel award winner in 1926

In the city of Alghero in the north, a dialect of Catalan is spoken (the name of the city in Catalan is L'Alguer) as the island was an Aragonese colony in the past. However, the two most widely spoken forms of the Sardinian languages are Campidanese, from the flatlands (Campidano) that cover most of the south (from Cagliari to Oristano), and Logudorese (Logudoro), from the central region, extending almost to Sassari. Grazia Deledda (September 27, 1871 – August 15, 1936), born in Nuoro, Sardinia, was an Italian writer whose works won her a Nobel Prize for Literature in 1926. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alghero (lAlguer in Catalan and SAlighèra in Sardinian), is a town of about 42,000 inhabitants (down from 54,300 inhabitants since early 20th century) in Italy. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... History of Spain series Prehistoric Spain Roman Spain Muslim Conquest of Iberia Timeline of Muslim Occupation Medieval Spain Age of Reconquest Age of Expansion Age of Enlightenment Reaction and Revolution First Spanish Republic The Restoration Second Spanish Republic Spanish Civil War The Dictatorship Modern Spain Topics Economic History Military History... Sardo campidanese is a diasystem of Sardinian language, spoken in the southern part of Sardinia. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Logudoro/Torres is an historical region of Sardinia, placed on the north-west portion of the island. ... Sassari (in Italian and Sassarese, a Corsican dialect; either Sassari or Tathari in southern Sardinian), is a town and a province in Sardinia, Italy. ...


Transport

Trains on Sardinia connect the whole island but are rather slow. Some run on narrow gauge track. Many tourists catch the trenino verde which runs through the wildest parts of the island. It is slow but it allows the traveller to have scenic views impossible to see from the main road. The train connects Cagliari to Arbatax in the south and Sassari to Palau in the north. It is highly recommended to make the trip from Macomer to Bosa Marina, where the train winds its way through the typical Sardinian landscape to reach the sea near the coastal town of Bosa situated in the west of the island. For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8½ in (1. ...


Environment

Cala d'Oliva in Asinara.
Cala d'Oliva in Asinara.

Sardinia is a precious natural resource, containing thousands of rare or uncommon animal and autochthonous plants and animals, such as the Mediterranean Monk Seal and the boar. Found only in Sardinia, Sicily, and MaghrebIt, the Sardinian skink (genus Chalcides ocellatus) known more commonly as Tiligugu, can reach 30 cm (12 in) in length, of which almost half is made up by the tail. Sardinia lacks many common species however, like the viper and the marmot, which are found everywhere else on the continent. Sardinia has four endemic subspecies of birds which are found nowhere else in the world: its Great Spotted Woodpecker (ssp harterti), Great Tit (ssp ecki), Chaffinch (ssp sarda) and Eurasian Jay (ssp ichnusae). It also shares a further 10 endemic subspecies of bird with Corsica. The island's environment is improving due to strict environment laws. A map showing the location of Asinara island. ... Binomial name Monachus monachus (Hermann, 1779) Mediterranean Monk Seal range The Mediterranean Monk Seal (Monachus monachus) is believed to be the worlds rarest pinniped and one of the most endangered mammals of the world. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... This article is about the reptile. ... Synonyms Viperini - Oppel, 1811 Viperes - Cuvier, 1817 Viperides - Latreille, 1825 Viperina - Gray, 1825 Viperiodea - Fitzinger, 1826 Viperiodei - Eichwald, 1831 Viperinae - Cantor, 1847 Viperiformes - Günther, 1864 Viperida - Strauch, 1869[1] Common names: pitless vipers, true vipers, Old World vipers,[2] true adders. ... Species See text. ... Genera Melanerpes Sphyrapicus Xiphidiopicus Dendropicos Dendrocopos Picoides Veniliornis Campethera Geocolaptes Dinopium Meiglyptes Hemicircus Micropternus Picus Mulleripicus Dryocopus Celeus Piculus Colaptes Campephilus Chrysocolaptes Reinwardtipicus Blythipicus Gecinulus Sapheopipo For other uses, see Woodpecker (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Upside down in Kolkata, West Bengal, India Devouring the prey in Kullu - Manali District of Himachal Pradesh, India in Kullu - Manali District of Himachal Pradesh, India The Great Tit, Parus major, is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. ... Binomial name Fringilla coelebs Linnaeus, 1758 The Chaffinch, (Fringilla coelebs), is a small passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae. ... Genera Garrulus Podoces Ptilostomus Perisoreus Aphelocoma Gymnorhinus Cyanocitta Calocitta Cyanocorax Cyanolyca The jays are several species of medium-sized, usually colorful and noisy passerine birds in the crow family Corvidae. ...


Sports

Cagliari is also home to the Cagliari Calcio football club, that was founded in the year 1900 and plays in the Serie A, the Italian top division. Home matches are played at the "Stadio Sant' Elia", named after the area where it is located, with a capacity of 23,486. It was built in the year 1970, and refurbished before the Italia '90 football World Championships. Carales redirects here. ... Cagliari Calcio is an Italian football club based in Cagliari, Sardinia. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sardinia also boasts a fine darting tradition, with many believing that the popular game in fact originated somewhere in the Sassari region of the country towards the end of the 15th century. In those days, the darts themselves were carved from Beech (Fagus) wood and the flights were feathers drawn from the indigenous Pollo Sultano, a bird famed for its spectacular violet-blue plumage. The early 21st century has seen one darter in particular proudly continuing his nation's rich sporting heritage. Brett "The Sardinian" Welch, at 21-years-old, presents the island's greatest hope of one day becoming a world champion. With a current average of 101.4, and weighing in at 280 pounds, he is confident of qualify for next year's BDO World Professional Darts Championship at the Lakeside. Sassari (in Italian and Sassarese, a Corsican dialect; either Sassari or Tathari in southern Sardinian), is a town and a province in Sardinia, Italy. ... For other uses, see Beech (disambiguation). ... Lakeside is the name of various places: in Canada: Lakeside, Kanata, Ontario Lakeside, a political riding in Manitoba in the United Kingdom: Lakeside Shopping Centre, Thurrock Lakeside, Cumbria at the southern end of Windermere in the United States: Lakeside, Arizona Lakeside Township, Minnesota Lakeside, Ohio Lakeside, San Patricio County, Texas...


Motorsport

Cagliari hosted in 2002 and 2003 a Formula 3000 race on a 2.414-km street circuit around Sant'Elia stadium. In 2003, also Renault F1's Jarno Trulli and former Ferrari's Jean Alesi did a spectacular exhibition. At the Grand Prix took part current BMW-F1 driver, Robert Kubica in a F.3 car, 'works' BMW WTCC Augusto Farfus, GP2's Fairuz Fauzy and Vitaly Petrov. Actually, Olbia hosts since 2004 the Rally d'Italia Sardegna, a rally competition in the FIA World Rally Championship schedule. The rally is held on narrow, twisty, sandy and bumpy mountain roads around the glamorous town of Porto Cervo. Carales redirects here. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Formula 3000 is a type of formula racing. ... This article is about the building type. ... For the author, see Mary Renault. ... Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel auto racing. ... Jarno Trulli (born 13 July 1974) is an Italian Formula One auto racing driver currently in the employ of the Toyota team. ... This article is about the automobile manufacturer. ... Jean Alesi, (born Giovanni Alesi June 11, 1964) is a French racing driver of both French and Sicilian origins. ... // Grand Prix (IPA: ) (French for Grand Prize) may refer to: Formula One - which evolved from Grand Prix motor racing, events are still known as Grand Prix, see the list of Formula One Grands Prix Grand Prix motor racing Grand Prix motorcycle racing Speedway Grand Prix (motorcycle speedway) Eurovision Song Contest... For the article about the Asian version of the GP2 series, see GP2 Asia Series The GP2 Series, GP2 for short, is a form of motor racing introduced in 2005 following the discontinuation of the long-term Formula One feeder sport, Formula 3000. ... Mohamed Fairuz Fauzy Mohamed Fairuz Fauzy is a race car driver born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on October 24, 1982. ... Vitaly Petrov (Russian: Виталий Петров, born September 8, 1984 in Vyborg) is a Russian auto racing driver. ... For Pontic Olbia, the Greek colony on the Black Sea coast, see Olbia, Ukraine. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supermag Rally Italia Sardinia is the seventh rally on the World Rally Championship schedule for 2006. ... Look up rally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Fédération Internationale de lAutomobile, commonly referred to as the FIA, is a non-profit association established in 1904 to represent the interest of motoring organisations and motor car users. ... The World Rally Championship (WRC) is a rallying series organised by the FIA, culminating with a champion driver and manufacturer. ... Porto Cervo is regarded as the jewel town of the Costa Smeralda and is located in the gulf of the same name in northern Sardinia. ...


Windsurfing

Porto Pollo north of Palau, is a bay often used by windsurfers and kitesurfers. The bay is divided by a thin tongue of land that separates it in an area for advanced and beginning/intermediate windsurfers. There is also a restricted area for kitesurfers. Many Italian freestyle surfers come to Porto Pollo for training, and 2007 saw the finale of the freestyle pro kids Europe 2007 contest. A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii. ... Power kites at Coche, Venezuela Kitesurfing in the Columbia River Gorge Kitesurfers use power kites hooked into harnesses to glide through water and air Kitesurfing at Port Douglas, Australia Kitesurfing, also known as kiteboarding, involves using a power kite to pull a rider through the water on a small surfboard...


Because of a venturi-effect between Sardinia and Corsica, western wind accelerates between the islands and creates the wind that makes Porto Pollo popular amongst windsurfing enthusiasts. In 2005, Aglientu, hosted the Kitesurf World Cup in the Vignola's Beach. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aglientu is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Olbia-Tempio in the Italian region Sardinia, located about 210 km north of Cagliari and about 35 km northwest of Olbia. ... The Rocca of Vignola. ...


Business and commerce

Sardinia's currency is now the Euro, called francu in Sardinian. For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


Several gold and silver mines operate on the island. GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ...


The Sardinian economy is today focused on tourism (peaking with the Costa Smeralda), industry, commerce, services and information technology; an increasing income is coming from its famous wines and gastronomy. Tourist redirects here. ... Costa Smeralda (Emerald Coast) is a coastal area in northern Sardinia, 55 km long and covering more than 30 km², with enchanting beaches and a system of villages built according to an extremely detailed urban plan. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information Technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ...


Tourism

The island contains numerous extraordinary tourist areas, Alghero, North West, with Capo Caccia astonishing cliffs and the famous Neptun Cave, and including the Costa Smeralda and Gennargentu. The island is particularly famous for its beaches, but is also rich in other interesting places, such as some charming sea towns and archaeological ruins. See also: Tourist destinations of Sardinia. Alghero (lAlguer in Catalan and SAlighèra in Sardinian), is a town of about 42,000 inhabitants (down from 54,300 inhabitants since early 20th century) in Italy. ... Costa Smeralda (Emerald Coast) is a coastal area in northern Sardinia, 55 km long and covering more than 30 km², with enchanting beaches and a system of villages built according to an extremely detailed urban plan. ... Gennargentu is a mountain in the province of Nuoro in Sardinia/Italy. ... For other uses, see Beach (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the most famous tourist destinations of Sardinia. ...


Marine and offshore

Saipem a contractor in the oil and gas industry and a subsidiary of Eni S.p.A, operates a shipyard on Sardinia. Their main activity is the fabrication of offshore oil rigs. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Ente nazionale idrocarburi http://fr. ...


Other facts on Sardinia

  • Casu Marzu is a cheese delicacy found in Sardinia,notable for being riddled with live insect larvae.
  • The phrase "sardonic grin" comes from the grimace found on victims of those poisoned by a certain herb found in Sardinia which contains strychnine-like alkaloids. It is said that family members would poison the infirm and elderly with the herb when the family was no longer able to afford to take care of them. (see assisted suicide).
  • Sardines were named after the country where they were once found in abundance.
  • Sardinia was the subject of the 1921 book Sea and Sardinia by D H Lawrence.
  • Sardinians have one of the world's longest average life spans (about age 83 for men, 85 for women) and a higher percentage of persons who are over age 80 (at 11.5 percent of the island population). Scientists studied the human longevity findings to whether this is a result of the Sardinian diet, lifestyle and health care.
  • Sardinia has the second highest rate of Diabetes mellitus type 1 in the world.[1]

No image available Country of origin Italy Region, town Sardinia Source of milk Sheep Pasteurized No Texture Soft Aging time  ? Certification none Casu marzu (also called casu modde or formaggio marcio) is a cheese found in Sardinia, Italy, notable for being riddled with live insect larvae. ... Euthanasia (Greek, good death) is the practice of killing a person or animal, in a painless or minimally painful way, for merciful reasons, usually to end their suffering. ... Sardines can refer to: The plural of sardine, a species of fish. ... Sea and Sardinia is a travel book by the English writer D H Lawrence. ... D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ... Diabetes mellitus type 1 (Type 1 diabetes, Type I diabetes, T1D, T1DM, IDDM, juvenile diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus. ...

World Heritage Sites

The Nuraghe, the main archaeological megalithic monument of Sardinia, are scattered throughout the island. Su Nuraxi di Barumini is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Su Nuraxi, Barumini, Sardinia Central tower of the Nuraghe at Saint Antine of Torralba Su Nurraxi. ...


See also

This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Gallurese (gadduresu) is a diasystem of the Sardinian language, spoken in the Gallura (Gaddura), north-eastern part of Sardinia including the town of Tempio Pausania (Tempiu). ... Sassarese is a diasystem of the Sardinian language, spoken in Sassaris area (north-western part of Sardinia) in Italy. ... The History of Sardinia covers several millennia of civilization of this Mediterranean isle. ... This is a list of the most famous tourist destinations of Sardinia. ... This is a list of famous people from Sardinia. ... The following is a list of rulers on the Island of Sardinia ,now a part of Italy . ... Archaeological and artistic sites of Sardinia Acquafredda near Siliqua, castle, 13th century Aiodda near Nurallao-Nuragus, Giants Tomb Albucciu near Olbia-Arzachena, nuraghe Alghero Anghelu Ruju near Algher-Ozieri, necropolis Antas near Fluminimaggiore, temple Ardara Romanesque church Argentiera carbon mines, ghost villages, industrial architecture Asoru near Muravera, nuraghe Assemini Catalan... Tavolara Island. ... This article is about entities that are not officially recognised by world governments or major international organisations. ...

External links

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

Line notes

  1. ^ Kumar and Clark, Clinical Medicine 6th Edition; 1103-1104

References

  • Stephen L. Dyson and Robert J. Rowland, Jr. Archaeology and History in Sardinia from the Stone Age to the Middle Ages. Shepherds, Sailors, and Conquerors (Philadelphia: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2008), Pp. viii, 240.

Coordinates: 40°00′N, 9°00′E The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... “Abruzzi” redirects here. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Basilicata is a region in the south of Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Puglia (Apulia) to the east, Calabria to the south, it has one short coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea and another of the Gulf of Taranto in the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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