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Encyclopedia > Sarah Lawrence College
SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE

Motto: Wisdom with understanding
Established: 1926
Type: Private
President: Karen R. Lawrence
Location: Yonkers, New York, USA
Campus: Suburban, 41+ acres
Mailing Address: 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY 10708
Mascot: Gryphon
Website: www.slc.edu


Sarah Lawrence is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States. It is located in southern Westchester County, New York, in the City of Yonkers, 15 miles north of Manhattan.[1][2] Sarah Lawrence was founded in 1926 as a women's college and became a coeducational institution in 1968. The College is known for its rigorous academic standards and low student-to-faculty ratio of 6-to-1. Individual student-faculty tutorials patterned after the Oxford/Cambridge system are a key component of all areas of study. Sarah Lawrence emphasizes scholarship, particularly in the humanities, performing arts, and writing, and places a high value on independent study. In The Best College for You, a 2000 co-publication of Time Magazine and The Princeton Review, Sarah Lawrence College was named the liberal arts College of the Year, citing the school's strong emphasis on writing as the key to its education.[3] Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Sarah Lawrence Colleges nationally recognized Graduate Writing Program offers its students a minimum of two academic years of intensive study of creative writing in either poetry, creative nonfiction, or fiction. ... Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The Sarah Lawrence College Art of Teaching Program is a graduate division of Sarah Lawrence College that offers training in education in both degree-track and continuing education formats. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... This article is about the state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... Write redirects here. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...

Contents

History

Sarah Lawrence College was established by real-estate mogul William Van Duzer Lawrence on the grounds of his estate in Westchester County and was named in honor of his wife, Sarah. The College was originally intended to provide instruction in the arts and humanities for women. A major component of the College's early curriculum was "productive leisure," wherein students were required to work for eight hours weekly in such fields as modeling, shorthand, typewriting, applying makeup, and gardening.[4] Its pedagogy, modeled on the tutorial system of Oxford University, combined independent research projects, individually supervised by the teaching faculty, and seminars with low student-to-faculty ratio -- a credo it retains to the present, despite its cost. Sarah Lawrence was the first liberal arts college in the United States to incorporate a rigorous approach to the arts with the principles of progressive education, focusing on the primacy of teaching and the concentration of curricular efforts on individual needs.[4] Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Mogul may mean: a bump in the snow in alpine skiing, a Mongolian the Mughal empire, or any member of its ruling dynasty by extension, any ruler or powerful person, such as a industrial mogul or media mogul a railroad steam locomotive type called the Mogul the largest size light... William Van Duzer Lawrence (1842-1927) was a millionaire real-estate and pharmaceutical mogul who is best known for having founded Sarah Lawrence College in 1926. ... Situated in Bronxville, New York, the Sarah Lawrence College campus is built around the original manor, known as Westlands, of the Colleges founder, William Van Duzer Lawrence. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... Shorthand is an abbreviated, symbolic writing method that improves speed of writing or brevity as compared to a normal method of writing a language. ... Mechanical desktop typewriters, such as this Underwood Five, were long time standards of government agencies, newsrooms, and sales offices. ... Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Educational progressivists believe that education must be based on the fact that humans are social animals who learn best in real-life activities with other people. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ...


In addition to founding Sarah Lawrence College, William Lawrence played a critical role in the development of the neighboring community of Bronxville, New York. His name can be found on the affluent Lawrence Park and Lawrence Park West neighborhoods, the Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate Corporation, and on Lawrence Hospital in downtown Bronxville, an institution that was created when Lawrence’s son, Dudley, nearly died en route to a hospital in neighboring New York City. Lawrence embodied ideas from the Progressivist movement of the 1890s, especially his view that the arts were a crucial element in the social evolution of individuals and families, in developing both private and public sensibilities, and in creating equal relations between men and women. Bronxville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States, located 15 miles north of midtown Manhattan. ... Bronxville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States, located 15 miles north of midtown Manhattan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Harold Taylor, President of Sarah Lawrence College from 1945 to 1959, greatly influenced the college. Taylor, elected president at age 30, maintained a friendship with educational philosopher John Dewey, and worked to employ the Dewey method at Sarah Lawrence. Taylor spent much of his career calling for educational reform in the United States, using the success of his own College as an example of the possibilities of a personalized, modern, and rigorous approach to higher education. Wikibooks has more about this subject: Learning Theories The philosophy of education is the study of the purpose, process, nature and ideals of education. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


Sarah Lawrence became a coeducational institution in 1968. Prior to this transition, there were discussions about relocating the school and merging with Princeton University, however the administration opted to remain independent. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


Political involvement and activism

Political activism has played a crucial role in forming the spirit of the Sarah Lawrence community since the early years of the College. As early as 1938, students were volunteering in working-class sections of Yonkers, New York to help bring equality and educational opportunities to poor and minority citizens, and the Sarah Lawrence College War Board, organized by students in the fall of 1942, sought to aid troops fighting in World War II. During a time when the College's enrollment consisted of only 293 students, 204 signed up as volunteers during the first week of the War Board.[5] During the so-called McCarthy Years, a number of Sarah Lawrence's faculty members were accused by the American Legion of being sympathetic to the Communist Party, and were called before the Jenner Committee.[6] Since that time, activism has played a central role in student life, with movements for civil rights and against the Vietnam War in the 1960s and for student and faculty diversity in the 1980s. Also in the 1960s, students established an Upward Bound program for students from lower-income and poverty areas to prepare for college.[7] Theatre Outreach, the Child Development Institute, the Empowering Teachers Program, the Community Writers program, the Office of Community Partnership, and the Fulbright High School Writers Program are among the many programs founded the since the 1970s to provide services to the larger community. In the late 1980s, students occupied Westlands, the main administrative building for the campus, in a sit-in for wider diversity. Students have remained active in recent years, with numerous organizations and movements sprouting in response to the Iraq War. For many years, the College has been considered as being at the vanguard of the sexual rights movement. Activism, in a general sense, can be described as involvement in action to bring about change, be it social, political, environmental, or other change. ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used in academic sociology and in ordinary conversation. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately twenty years (1960-1980) in which there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the supposed dangers of a Communist takeover. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is a Marxist-Leninist political party in the United States. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Vietnam War was a war fought between 1957 and 1975 on the ground in South Vietnam and bordering areas of Cambodia and Laos (See Secret War) and in bombing runs (Rolling Thunder) over North Vietnam. ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Upward Bound is a program of the United States Department of Education, the goal of this which is to give high school students who are in categories that make them less likely to attend college (such as low income, parents who didnt attend college, and living in rural areas... The Sarah Lawrence College Art of Teaching Program is a graduate division of Sarah Lawrence College that offers training in education in both degree-track and continuing education formats. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...


Academics

At the undergraduate level, Sarah Lawrence offers a Bachelor of Arts degree where, instead of traditional majors, students pursue a wide variety of courses in four different curricular distributions: the Creative Arts (creative writing, music, dance, theater, painting, and film), history and the social sciences (anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology), the humanities (Asian studies, art history, film studies, languages, literature, philosophy, and religion), and natural science and mathematics (biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, and mathematics). Each student is assigned to a faculty advisor, known as a "don," to plan a course of study. Most courses, apart from those in the performing arts, consist of two parts: the seminar, limited to 15 students, and the conference, a private, semi-weekly meeting with a seminar professor. In these conferences, students develop individual projects that extend the course material and link it to their personal interests. Sarah Lawrence has no required courses and traditional examinations have largely been replaced with writing final research papers and essays. Additionally, grades are recorded only for transcript purposes—academic evaluations are given in lieu of grades.[8] The College sponsors international programs in Florence, at Wadham College, Oxford, at Reid Hall in Paris, and at the British American Drama Academy in London. Additionally, Sarah Lawrence is one of the only American colleges operating an international program in Cuba (Hampshire College being one of the others). In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... This article is about the unit of teaching. ... Film theory seeks to develop concise, systematic concepts that apply to the study of film/cinema as art. ... This article is about the social science. ... In universities, especially traditiona colleageate universities such as Oxford and Cambridge, a don is traditionally, a fellow or tutor of a college. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... In scientific publishing, a paper is a scientific article that is published in a scientific journal. ... This article is about evaluation of school work. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Reid Hall is a complex of academic facilities owned and operated by Columbia University that is located in the Montparnasse district of Paris, France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ...


Sarah Lawrence also offers Master's-level programs in Writing, the Art of Teaching, Child Development, Health Advocacy, Human Genetics, Theatre, and Dance, and is home to the nation's oldest graduate program in Women's History. A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... Write redirects here. ... The Sarah Lawrence College Art of Teaching Program is a graduate division of Sarah Lawrence College that offers training in education in both degree-track and continuing education formats. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A karyotype of a human male, showing 46 chromosomes including XY sex chromosomes. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Womens history is a term that refers to information about the past in regard to the female human being. ...


International programs: The College has six international programs in four countries. Sarah Lawrence makes all practical efforts to preserve its most characteristic elements, such as one-on-one interaction with professors, small classes, and an emphasis on qualitative comprehension, in its programs overseas.

  • Havana: The only formal American university program currently operating in Cuba, the program is open to students with an intermediate or advanced level of competency in Spanish, and focuses on language skills, the social sciences, and the humanities.
  • London: Centered at the British American Drama Academy, the program expands Sarah Lawrence's long-standing and vibrant tradition in the performing arts.
  • Oxford: An advanced academic program based at Wadham College, Oxford University in England.
  • Paris: Centered at historic Reid Hall in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, the program is Sarah Lawrence's oldest and focuses on the humanities and creative arts.
  • Catania: Open to students who have an advanced comprehension of Italian, the Catania program takes advantage of its Sicilian setting to provide students with an experience in cultural immersion.
  • Florence: Open to students at all levels of Italian-language comprehension, the Florence program is noted for its art history program.

Graduate programs: Sarah Lawrence offers eight graduate programs, each of which confers the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree upon its graduates. In contrast to highly specialized, research-oriented doctoral study, these programs reflect the emphasis on interdisciplinary studies and the close student-teacher relationship that have come to be characteristic of the College's undergraduate program. Intensive work with faculty members, small seminars, and one-on-one conferences form the foundation of the curricular model. According to their own literature, the programs make an effort to balance the "theoretical (usually discussed in seminars and conferences) with the practical (in the form of fieldwork, practicums, research or creative work). This experiential work is most often conducted not in isolation, but in the midst of a community. Interdisciplinary work and ideas are encouraged, as is an ethic of social responsibility." There are approximately 340 graduate students currently enrolled in the following programs: This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Reid Hall is a complex of academic facilities owned and operated by Columbia University that is located in the Montparnasse district of Paris, France. ... The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built. ... The Roman Odeon. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... This article is about the concept. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Interdisciplinary work is that which integrates concepts across different disciplines. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ... Fieldwork refers to scientific activity conducted in the field, outside the laboratory, of subject matter in an as-found state, by anthropologists, geologists, botanists, archaeologists or others who study the natural or human world. ... Practicum is a school or college course, especially one in a specialized field of study, that is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied theory: advanced practicums in teaching reading. ... Experiential Learning occurs when individuals engage in some activity, reflect upon the activity critically, derive some useful insight from the analysis, and incorporate the result through a change in understanding and/or behaviour. ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... Social responsibility is an ethical or ideological theory that an entity whether it is a government, corporation, organization or individual has a responsibility to society. ...

SAT and academic ranking: The Sarah Lawrence College Art of Teaching Program is a graduate division of Sarah Lawrence College that offers training in education in both degree-track and continuing education formats. ... Sarah Lawrence Colleges nationally recognized Graduate Writing Program offers its students a minimum of two academic years of intensive study of creative writing in either poetry, creative nonfiction, or fiction. ...

In 2007, some educators in the United States began to question the impact of rankings on the college admissions process, due in part to the 11 March 2007 Washington Post article "The Cost of Bucking College Rankings" by Dr. Michele Tolela Myers, the former president of Sarah Lawrence College. As Sarah Lawrence College dropped its SAT test score submission requirement for its undergraduate applicants in 2003,[9] thus joining the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission, SLC does not have SAT data to send to U.S. News for its national survey. Of this decision, Myers states, "We are a writing-intensive school, and the information produced by SAT scores added little to our ability to predict how a student would do at our college; it did, however, do much to bias admission in favor of those who could afford expensive coaching sessions."[10] At present, Sarah Lawrence is the only American college that completely disregards SAT scores in its admission process.[11] As a result of this policy, in the same Washington Post article, Dr. Myers stated that she was informed by the U.S. News and World Report that if no SAT scores were submitted, U.S. News would "make up a number" to use in its magazines. She further argues that if SLC were to decide to stop sending all data to U.S. News and World Report, their ranking would be artificially decreased.[12][13] U.S. News and World Report issued a response to this article on 12 March 2007 which stated that the evaluation of Sarah Lawrence is currently under review.[14] The most recent (2008) issue of the US News and World Report rankings has put Sarah Lawrence among the "unranked" insititutions, colleges and universities that for a variety of reasons do not adhere to the magazine's guidelines. Criticism of college and university rankings (2007 United States) refers to a 2007 movement which developed among faculty and administrators in American Institutions of Higher Education. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... College admissions in the United States play an important sociological role, determining (in part) the quality of education a person will receive as well as his or her career track. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... ... Sarah Lawrence is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... College admissions or university admission is the process through which students enter post-secondary education at universities and colleges. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


On Tuesday, June 19, 2007, following a meeting of the Annapolis Group, which represents over 100 liberal arts colleges, Sarah Lawrence announced that it would join others who had previously signed the letter to college presidents asking them not to participate in the "reputation survey" section of the U.S. News and World Report survey (this section comprises 25% of the ranking). Myers commented on this in a 20 June 2007 article for the New York Times by stating, "they will do what they will do, [...] we will do what we will do. And we want to do it in a principled way."[15] Myers also indicated in a press release for Sarah Lawrence that the college will be involved in developing the new database of colleges discussed in the Annapolis Group statement as they "believe in accountability and openness, and that the public has a right to solid and reliable information about the important decisions involved in choosing a college." The press release also indicated that Sarah Lawrence "plans not to participate in the peer reputational survey or data collection for U.S. News and World Report’s rankings" as, according to Myers, "by submitting data and the peer reputation survey we have tacitly been endorsing these rankings [...] all the information we have provided to U.S. News in the past will be available to the public through other channels."[16] The Annapolis Group is a nonprofit alliance of the nation’s leading independent liberal arts colleges. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Criticism of college and university rankings (2007 United States) refers to a 2007 movement which developed among faculty and administrators in American Institutions of Higher Education. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Annapolis Group is a nonprofit alliance of the nation’s leading independent liberal arts colleges. ...


Tuition and finances

The total cost of tuition, fees, room, and board for a student entering in the fall of 2007 was $51,694 (tuition and fees were together $39,786).


Campus

The Sarah Lawrence campus is located on 41 hilly acres of grassy fields and rocky outcroppings atop a promontory above the banks of the Bronx River. Much of the campus was originally a part of the estate of the College's founder, William Van Duzer Lawrence, though the College has more than doubled its geographical size since Lawrence bequeathed his estate to the College in 1926. The terrain of the campus is characterized by dramatic outcroppings of exposed bedrock shaded by large oak and elm trees. Much of the older architecture on the campus follows the Tudor style that was popular in the area during the early 20th century, and many of the College's newer buildings attempt to achieve an updated interpretation of the same pattern language. It can be said that the campus is divided into two distinctive sections: the "Old Campus" and the "New Campus," wherein the former is roughly contained within the boundaries of the erstwhile Lawrence estate, and the latter is that which was obtained some time after the College's earliest years. Situated in Bronxville, New York, the Sarah Lawrence College campus is built around the original manor, known as Westlands, of the Colleges founder, William Van Duzer Lawrence. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Bronx River in Westchester County, NY The Bronx River is a river, approximately 24 mi (38 km) long, in southeast New York in the United States. ... William Van Duzer Lawrence (1842-1927) was a millionaire real-estate and pharmaceutical mogul who is best known for having founded Sarah Lawrence College in 1926. ... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... Ascott House, Buckinghamshire. ... A pattern language is a special form of textual documentation, used to document successful solutions to typical challenges in a design process. ...


The area outside the original Lawrence estate is home to the College's more cutting-edge facilities. A number of stately, century-old Tudor-style mansions will be found among these newer additions, including Andrews, Tweed, Lynd, Marshall Field, and Slonim House. Each was once a private estate, purchased by the college during periods of growth and expansion. The more modest tudor houses along Mead Way, which were also once private residences, now serve as dorms for Sarah Lawrence students. "Slonim Woods" is a group of newer, townhouse-style dorms, built on the grounds of Slonim House.


The Campbell Sports Center was constructed in 1998 in response to an increased focus on physical fitness and sports. This state-of-the-art facility includes an indoor pool, gymnasium, track, raquetball courts, and weightrooms.


In 2004, the College completed construction of a state-of-the-art visual arts facility, the Monika A. and Charles A. Heimbold Visual Arts Center, the sleek architecture and environmentally friendly aspects of which earned the College national press attention. Just down the road is Hill House, a seven-story apartment building purchased by the College in the late 1990s that now houses student residences. Across the street from Hill House is the large Wrexham house, also in the Tudor style, that was purchased by Sarah Lawrence in 2004 from the government of Rwanda. This building, which once housed the Rwandan consul, has been renovated and is used by the College for various graduate studies programs. On the opposite end of the campus stands the Science and Mathematics Center, completed in 1994. Environmentally friendly, also referred to as nature friendly, is a term used to refer to goods and services considered to inflict minimal harm on the environment. ...


Presidents

Presidents Mansion
  • Michele Tolela Myers (1998–2007) was born in Morocco and raised in Paris. Myers holds a Ph.D. and a master's degree from the University of Denver, another master's degree from Trinity University in San Antonio, and a Diplôme in political science and economics from the Institute of Political Studies at the University of Paris. Myers saw the recent completion of a $75 million capital campaign at Sarah Lawrence, as well as the construction of several new buildings and facilities on the campus.
  • Alice Stone Ilchman (1981–1998), who served as an educational advisor to President Jimmy Carter, saw the expansion of the College's physical resources, faculty, and student body.
  • Charles DeCarlo (1969–1981. A former IBM executive, DeCarlo was a strong force in solidifying the College's finances.
  • Esther Raushenbush (1965–1969). A former member of the Sarah Lawrence literature faculty (1935–1946 and 1957–1962), dean of the College (1946–1957), and founder and director of Sarah Lawrence's Center for Continuing Education (1962–1965).
  • Paul Ward (1960–1965). A former engineering professor at the Carnegie Institute of Technology.
  • Harrison Tweed (Acting President, 1959–1960). A longtime board member, Tweed increased the size of the College while refusing to enlarge classes.
  • Harold Taylor (1945–1959). Renowned for having remembered the names of every student on campus, Taylor, elected at age 30, was the youngest and perhaps most influential president in the College's history.
  • Constance Warren (1929–1945). Warren's primary contribution to the College was her recruitment of a nationally renowned faculty and her advocacy of a progressive educational philosophy in the College's early years.
  • Marion Coats (1924–1929). A friend of Vassar College President Henry McCracken and of Sarah Lawrence founder William Van Duzer Lawrence, Coats served as the College's first president.

This article is about the writer and poet. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... Yale redirects here. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public coeducational research university situated in Irvine, California. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ... Trinity University may refer to: Trinity University of San Antonio, Texas Trinity University of Washington, D.C. (formerly Trinity College) There are also several other educational institutions called Trinity College. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Alice Stone Ilchman (April 18, 1935- August 11, 2006) served as the eighth president of Sarah Lawrence College from 1981 to 1998. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... Harrison Tweed (1885–1969) was acting president of Sarah Lawrence College (SLC), 1959–1960. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ...

Notable people

// Since its founding in 1926, the College has awarded some 5,000 degrees in both graduate and undergraduate disciplines. ... Melvin Jules Bukiet is a novelist and literary critic living in New York City. ... Fawaz Gerges (b. ... Marie Howe, born in 1950, is an American poet living in Provincetown, Massachusetts. ... Franklin Frank Delano Roosevelt III (born July 19, 1938) is a professor of economics at Sarah Lawrence College. ... Eduardo Lago (b. ... Spanish literary prize awarded 6 January of every year since 1944 by the editorial house Ediciones Destino. ... Jeffrey J. Abrams (usually credited as Jeffrey Abrams or J.J. Abrams) (born June 27, 1966) is an American film and television producer, writer, actor, composer and director. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... Barbara Jill Walters[2] (born September 25, 1929) is an American journalist, writer, and media personality who has been a regular fixture on morning television shows (Today and The View), an evening news magazine (20/20), and on The ABC Evening News as the first female evening news anchor. ... Ivan Simon Cary Elwes (born October 26, 1962) is an English actor credited as Cary Elwes, best known for his performances in The Princess Bride, Robin Hood: Men in Tights and Saw. ... Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay on Maude. ... Sam Robards is an American actor. ... Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy award winning American actress. ... Téa Leoni (born February 25, 1966) is an American actress. ... Eric Harry Timothy Mabius (born April 22, 1971) is an American actor. ... Julianna Margulies on the cover of Marie Claire Julianna Luisa Margulies is an actress whose role on the NBC drama ER brought her recognition and fame. ... Amanda Jay Mortimer Burden (born 1944) is the director of the New York City Department of City Planning and chair of the City Planning Commission. ... Sharon Hom is currently Executive Director of Human Rights in China (HRIC), and professor of law emerita, City University of New York School of Law. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Rahm Emanuel (born November 29, 1959) is an American politician. ... GOP redirects here. ... Susan Weisenbarger Sue Kelly (born on September 26, 1936) has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the 19th District of New York. ... The MacArthur Fellows Program or MacArthur Fellowship (sometimes nicknamed the genius grant) is an award given by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation each year to typically 20 to 40 citizens or residents of the US, of any age and working in any field, who show exceptional merit... Meredith Monk (born November 20, 1942, in Lima, Peru[1]) is an American composer, performer, director, vocalist, film-maker, and choreographer. ...

References in popular culture

In 10 Things I Hate about You one the main characters is determined to attend Sarah Lawrence. In The Notebook, Rachel McAdams' character attends the institution. 10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film. ... The Notebook is a 1996 American romantic novel by Nicholas Sparks that was later adapted into a popular romantic film by the same name in 2004. ...


While trying to get two non-lesbian women to copulate, Christian Bale in American Psycho states: "C'mon - you did go to Sarah Lawrence." The 2002 film XX/XY (made by former SLC alumnus Austin Chick), examines the complex relationship between three Sarah Lawrence college students, both during their time at the school and then many years later. The school has also been portrayed by such writers as J.D. Salinger, Joseph Heller, Don Delillo, Tom Wolfe, and Brett Easton Ellis, and has found mention in numerous other television shows and films. The character of Karen on the hit show Will & Grace also attended Sarah Lawrence, and she refers to it throughout the series. In Entourage, Ari Gold points out that Lloyd has an art history degree from Sarah Lawrence. For other uses, see American Psycho (disambiguation). ... XX/XY is a film released in 2002 starring Mark Ruffalo and Maya Stange. ... Austin Chick is a feature film director. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... Bret Easton Ellis (born March 7, American author. ... Will & Grace is a popular American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on NBC from 1998 to 2006. ... Entourage is an Emmy Award-winning HBO original series created by Doug Ellin that chronicles the rise of Vincent Chase — a young A-list movie star — and his childhood friends from Queens, New York City as they navigate the unfamiliar terrain of Hollywood, California. ... Ariel A. Ari Gold is a character on the comedy-drama television series Entourage. ... This is the list of major and minor recurring characters in the ongoing HBO dramedy series Entourage. ...


Athletics

The College sponsors intercollegiate teams in crew, equestrian, men's basketball, men and women’s tennis, women’s volleyball, women’s softball, and women's swimming. The College's official mascot is the Gryphon. It was chosen in the 1990s to represent the College's athletics teams after a long period of fielding sports teams without an official mascot. For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...


Publications

The school-sponsored newspaper at Sarah Lawrence is The Phoenix. The school also promotes "Sadie Lou," an online publication. It contains a student-run magazine, a guide to the Westchester area, and a list of student organizations. "Sarah Lawrence Library News" is a blog created by library staff.


Notes

  1. ^ Sarah Lawrence College Position Specification, page 7
  2. ^ The Village of Bronxville Institutions
  3. ^ SLC honored for writing program that encourages students to write, think, communicate clearly
  4. ^ a b Kaplan, Barbara (26 February 2006). Becoming Sarah Lawrence. Sarah Lawrence College. 
  5. ^ Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz (1993). Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 
  6. ^ Fried, Richard M. (1990). Nightmare in Red: The McCarthy Era in Perspective. Oxford University Press. 
  7. '^ United States. United States Congress. Joint Committee. A Directory of Urban Research Study Centers. Washington: United States Congress, 1977.
  8. ^ At a Glance: About SLC. Sarah Lawrence College. Retrieved on 2008-01-29.
  9. ^ Sarah Lawrence College Drops SAT Requirement, Saying a New Writing Test Misses the Point. The New York Times (13 November 2003).
  10. ^ Tolela Myers, Michele (11 March 2007). The Cost of Bucking College Rankings. The Washington Post.
  11. ^ U.S. News Statement on College Rankings. U.S. News and World Report (12 March 2007).
  12. ^ Tolela Myers, Michele (11 March 2007). The Cost of Bucking College Rankings. The Washington Post.
  13. ^ Jaschik, Scott (12 March 2007). Would U.S. News Make Up Fake Data?. Inside Higher Ed.
  14. ^ U.S. News Statement on College Rankings. U.S. News and World Report (12 March 2007).
  15. ^ Finder, Alan (20 June 2007). Some Colleges to Drop Out of U.S. News Rankings. New York Times.
  16. ^ Sarah Lawrence College Endorses Annapolis Group Actions. Sarah Lawrence College.

is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Inside Higher Ed is a free daily online publication that covers a variety of college and university issues. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Sarah Lawrence College - MSN Encarta (287 words)
Sarah Lawrence is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States.
Degrees offered by the college include the bachelor of arts; master of arts in child development, women’s history, and other fields; master of science in human genetics; master of fine arts in creative writing, dance, and theater; master of professional studies; and master of science in education.
Notable alumni of Sarah Lawrence College include journalist Barbara Walters, choreographer and dancer Meredith Monk, and author Alice Walker, winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize in fiction.
Sarah Lawrence College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3910 words)
Sarah Lawrence boasts a six-to-one student-to-faculty ratio and a nontraditional, rigorous, and individualized approach to academics that focuses on the primacy of the student-teacher relationship.
Sarah Lawrence College was originally founded as a women's college in 1926 by pharmaceutical and real-estate mogul William Van Duzer Lawrence on the grounds of his estate and named for his wife, in Westchester County.
Sarah Lawrence does not use grades for the purposes of student competition or as a singular representation of a student's achievement in a given course.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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