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Encyclopedia > Sanssouci

Coordinates: 52°24′12″N, 13°2′19″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

The South or Garden façade and corps de logis of Sanssouci
The South or Garden façade and corps de logis of Sanssouci

Sanssouci (French "without cares") is the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia at Potsdam, just outside Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles. While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, it is notable for the numerous temples and follies in Sanssouci Park. Designed by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff between 1745 and 1747 to fulfil Frederick's need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court, the palace is little more than a large single-storey villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. So great was the influence of Frederick's personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace that its style is characterised as "Frederician Rococo", and so personally did he regard the palace that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him".[1] Because of a disagreement about the sight of the palace from the park Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect finished the project. Sans Souci was the palacial residence of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia 1740 - 1786. ... Download high resolution version (2544x930, 658 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2544x930, 658 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... Blenheim Palace, unscaled plan of the Corps de logis. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... Château de Maisons near Paris: François Mansart, 1642. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... Broadway Tower, Worcestershire, England The folly at Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire, England, built in the 1700s to resemble Gothic-era ruins In architecture, a folly is an extravagant, frivolous or fanciful building, designed more for artistic expression than for practicality. ... Sanssouci Park around 1900 Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. ... Officer, architect and painter Georg Wenzeslaus Baron von Knobelsdorff in a portrait by Adam Manyoki, a court painter from Dresden Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff (Born 17 February 1699 at Kuckädel in what is now Krosno OdrzaÅ„skie (Crossen an der Oder); Died 16 September 1753 in Berlin) was a... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ... The Château de Marly was located in what has become Marly-le-Roi, the commune that existed at the edge of the royal park. ... In gardening, a terrace is an element where a raised flat paved or gravelled section overlooks a prospect. ... Frederican Rococo is a form of rococo, which developed in Prussia during the reign of Frederick the Great and combined influences from both France and the Netherlands. ...


During the 19th century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the locality and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918. Frederick William IV Sanssouci at the time of Frederick William IV covers the period almost one hundred years after the palaces construction, when a King who was convinced of the divine right of his crown and of the absolute claim to power of the ruler came to the Prussian... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... Babelsberg Castle in Potsdam-Babelsberg Ludwig Persius (15th February 1803-12th July 1845) was a Prussian architect and a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. ... A Swiss House in Klein Glienicke built by von Arnim Ferdinand von Arnim (15 September 1814 in Treptow an der Rega near Berlin–23 March 1866 in Berlin) was an architect and watercolour-painter. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ...

After World War II, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. It was fully maintained with due respect to its historical importance, and was open to the public. Following German reunification in 1990, the final wish of Frederick came to pass: his body was finally returned to his beloved palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO;[2] in 1995, the Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around of Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world. Image File history File links Fryderyk_2. ... Image File history File links Fryderyk_2. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... GDR redirects here. ... German reunification (German: ) took place on October 3, 1990, when the areas of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR, in English commonly called East Germany) were incorporated into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG, in English commonly called West Germany). The start of this reunification process is commonly referred to... The tomb of Frederick the Great The Tomb of Frederick the Great was a subject to which Old Fritz, as he was popularly known, gave a great deal of thought. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ...

Contents

Ethos of Sanssouci

Frederick the Great's sketch for the plan of Sanssouci was the prototype for the palace (north is at the top). A single enfilade of ten principal rooms forms the south-facing corps de logis. To the north, two segmented colonnades form a cour d'honneur. Two flanking service wings (hidden from view, screened by trees and covered by climbing plants) provide the necessary but mundane domestic offices.

The location and layout of Sanssouci above a vineyard reflected the pre-Romantic ideal of harmony between man and nature, in a landscape ordered by human touch. Winemaking, however, was to take second place to the design of the palace and pleasure gardens. The hill on which Frederick created his terrace vineyard was to become the focal point of his demesne, crowned by the new, but small, palace—"mein Weinberghäuschen" ("my little vineyard house"), as Frederick called it.[3] With its extensive views of the countryside in the midst of nature, Frederick wanted to reside there sans souci ("without a care") and to follow his personal and artistic interests. Hence, the palace was intended for the use of Frederick and his private guests only during the summer months, from the end of April to the beginning of October. Image File history File links Frederick_II._Sannsouci. ... Image File history File links Frederick_II._Sannsouci. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with prototyping. ... Enfilade and defilade are military tactical concepts used to describe a fighting units exposure to enemy fire. ... Blenheim Palace, unscaled plan of the Corps de logis. ... Enormous colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg. ... Blenheim Palace, The Cour dHonneur is the large central court formed by the secondary wings containing kitchens and domestic offices flanking the Corps de logis Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Cour d... A common vineyard. ... For the general context, see Romanticism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Twenty years after his creation of Sanssouci, Frederick built the New Palace (Neues Palais) in the western part of the park. This far larger palace was in direct contrast to the relaxed ethos behind Sanssouci, and displayed Frederick's power and strength to the world, in the Baroque style. The design of the New Palace was intended to demonstrate that Prussia's capabilities were undiminished despite its near defeat in the Seven Years' War.[4] Frederick made no secret of his intention, even referring to the new construction as his "fanfaronnade" ("showing off").[5] The New Palace in Sanssouci Park The New Palace from the south Front view of the New Palace The New Palace (German: Neues Palais) is a palace situated on the western side of the Sanssouci royal park in Potsdam. ... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and Sicily Kingdom of Sardinia...


This concept of a grand palace designed to impress has led to the comparison of the palaces of Potsdam to Versailles,[6] with Sanssouci being thrust into the role of one of the Trianons. This analogy, though easy to understand, ignores the original merits of the concept behind Sanssouci, the palace for which the whole park and setting were created. Unlike the Trianons, Sanssouci was not an afterthought to escape the larger palace, for the simple reason that the larger palace did not exist at the time of Sanssouci's conception. It is true, however, that Sanssouci was intended to be a private place of retreat rather than display of power and strength and architectural merit. Unlike the Trianons, Sanssouci was designed to be a whole unto itself. The Petit Trianon, Versailles The Petit Trianon, situated at a short distance from the Grand Trianon in Versailles, France, was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel by order of Louis XV for his long-term mistress, Madame de Pompadour, and was constructed between 1762-1768. ...

One of the two segmented colonnades enclosing the cour d'honneur on the northern side of the palace.
One of the two segmented colonnades enclosing the cour d'honneur on the northern side of the palace.

Sanssouci is small, with the principal block (or corps de logis) being a narrow single-storey enfilade of just ten rooms, including a service passage and staff rooms behind them. Frederick's amateur sketch of 1745 (illustrated above)[7] demonstrates that his architect, Knobelsdorff, was more a draughtsman at Sanssouci than complete architect. Frederick appears to have accepted no suggestions for alteration to his plans, refusing Knobelsdorff's idea that the palace should have a semi-basement storey, which would not only have provided service areas closer at hand, but would have put the principal rooms on a raised piano nobile. This would have given the palace not only a more commanding presence, but also would have prevented the problems of dampness to which it has always been prone.[7] However, Frederick wanted an intimate palace for living: for example, rather than scaling a large number of steps, he wanted to enter the palace immediately from the garden. He insisted on a building on the ground level, of which the pedestal was the hill: in short, this was to be a private pleasure house. His recurring theme and requirement was for a house with close connections between its style and free nature. The principal rooms, lit by tall slender windows, face south over the vineyard gardens; the north façade is the entrance front, where a semicircular cour d'honneur was created by two segmented Corinthian colonnades. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2163x1602, 673 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Ehrenhofkolonnade at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2163x1602, 673 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Ehrenhofkolonnade at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Enormous colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg. ... Blenheim Palace, The Cour dHonneur is the large central court formed by the secondary wings containing kitchens and domestic offices flanking the Corps de logis Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Cour d... Blenheim Palace, unscaled plan of the Corps de logis. ... Enfilade and defilade are military tactical concepts used to describe a fighting units exposure to enemy fire. ... Technical drawing, also known as drafting, is the practice of creating accurate representations of objects for technical, architectural and engineering needs. ... Belton House. ... Kedleston Hall. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... Blenheim Palace, The Cour dHonneur is the large central court formed by the secondary wings containing kitchens and domestic offices flanking the Corps de logis Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Cour d... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ...


In the park, east of the palace, is the Sanssouci Picture Gallery, built from 1755 to 1764 under the supervision of the architect Johann Gottfried Büring. It stands on the site of a former greenhouse, where Frederick raised tropical fruit. The Picture Gallery is the oldest extant museum built for a ruler in Germany. Like the palace itself, it is a long, low building, dominated by a central domed bow of three bays. South side of the Picture Gallery The Picture Gallery in the park of Sanssouci palace in Potsdam was built in 1755-1764 during the reign of Frederick II of Prussia under the supervision of Johann Gottfried Büring. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of fruits#Tropical fruits. ...

The south facing garden façade. Frederick the Great ignored his architect's advice to place the piano nobile upon a low ground floor. As a result, the palace failed to take maximum advantage of its location. Its windows are devoid of views, and seen from its lower terraces it appears to be more of an orangery than a palace.
The south facing garden façade. Frederick the Great ignored his architect's advice to place the piano nobile upon a low ground floor. As a result, the palace failed to take maximum advantage of its location. Its windows are devoid of views, and seen from its lower terraces it appears to be more of an orangery than a palace.

Following the death of Frederick a new era began, a visible sign of which was the change in architectural styles. Neo-Classicism, popular elsewhere in Europe but ignored by Frederick, now found its way to Potsdam and Berlin during the reign of the new king Frederick William II. He ordered the construction of a new palace in the new more fashionable style, and stayed at Sanssouci only occasionally. Download high resolution version (1200x640, 255 KB)Palace and glasshouses of Sanssouci From German Wikipedia. ... Download high resolution version (1200x640, 255 KB)Palace and glasshouses of Sanssouci From German Wikipedia. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Kedleston Hall. ... Look up terrace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s). ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Frederick William II (September 25, 1744 - November 16, 1797), king of Prussia, was known in German as Friedrich Wilhelm II. Frederick William II of Prussia Frederick William was the son of Augustus William (the second son of King Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia) and of Louise Amalie of Brunswick-L...


The reception and bedrooms were renovated and completely altered immediately after Frederick's death. Frederick William von Erdmannsdorff received the commission for the refurbishment. While Frederick had been constructing the New Palace in the Baroque style between 1763 and 1769, Erdmannsdorff, an advocate of the new neo-classical style, had created Schloss Wörlitz in Wörlitz Park, the first neo-classical palace in Germany. As a result of his influence, Sanssouci became the first of the palaces in Potsdam and Berlin to be remodelled with a neo-classical interior. In 1797, Frederick William II was succeeded by Frederick William III; he visited Sanssouci even less frequently than did his father, preferring to spend the summer months in Paretz Palace or on the Pfaueninsel in Berlin. Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Erdmannsdorff (18 May 1736 - 9 March 1800) was a German architect and architectural theoretician, and one of the most significant representatives of early German Neoclassicism. ... The New Palace in Sanssouci Park The New Palace from the south Front view of the New Palace The New Palace (German: Neues Palais) is a palace situated on the western side of the Sanssouci royal park in Potsdam. ... View of Wörlitz Lake View from a gondola of one of the numerous canals Wörlitz Park, also known as the English Grounds of Wörlitz, is a major part of the Dessau-Wörlitz Garden Realm, which was created in the later part of the 18th century under... Frederick William III Frederick William III, known in German as Friedrich Wilhelm III, reigned as king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Map of Paretz The village of Paretz is located in the German State of Brandenburg in the county of Havelland, west of Berlin. ... Palmenhaus auf der Pfaueninsel bei Potsdam, Carl Blechen, 1832-1834 Castle on the Pfaueninsel The Pfaueninsel (Eng: Peacock Island) is an island situated in the Havel river near the Berlin Wannsee. ...


Architecture of Sanssouci

Architectural detail from the central bow of the garden façade: Atlas and Caryatids.
Architectural detail from the central bow of the garden façade: Atlas and Caryatids.

It was no coincidence that Frederick selected the Rococo style of architecture for Sanssouci. The light, almost whimsical style then in vogue exactly suited the light-hearted uses for which he required this retreat. The Rococo style of art emerged in France in the early 18th century as a continuation of the Baroque style, but in contrast with the heavier themes and darker colours of the Baroque, the Rococo was characterized by an opulence, grace, playfulness, and lightness. Rococo motifs focused on the carefree aristocratic life and on light-hearted romance, rather than on heroic battles and religious figures: they also revolve heavily around natural and exterior settings; this again suited Frederick’s ideal of nature and design being in complete harmony. The palace was completed much as Frederick had envisaged in his preliminary sketches (see illustration above) Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2233x1674, 842 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Bronze letters SANS SOUCI at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci User:Trebor27trebor Sanssouci translation Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2233x1674, 842 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Bronze letters SANS SOUCI at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci User:Trebor27trebor Sanssouci translation Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Atlantes in eclectic style, KanaÅ‚owa Str. ... A caryatid (also spelt Karyatid), is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... In art, a motif is a repeated idea, pattern, image, or theme. ...


The palace has a single-storey principal block with two flanking side wings. The building occupies almost the entire upper terrace. The potential monotony of the façade is broken by a central bow, its dome rising above the hipped roof, with the name of the palace on it in gilded bronze letters. The secondary side wings on the garden front are screened by two symmetrical rows of trees each terminating in free-standing trellised gazebos, richly decorated with gilded ornaments. A trellis is a frame-like structure on which vined plants can grow. ... A large ass gazebo on the grounds of Iolani Palace, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA This gazebo inside the spacious Singapore Botanic Gardens also serves as a bandstand. ...


The garden front of the palace is decorated by carved figures of Atlas and Caryatids; grouped in pairs between the windows, these appear to support the balustrade above. Executed in sandstone, these figures of both sexes represent Bacchants, the companions of the wine god Bacchus, and originate from the workshop of the sculptor Friedrich Christian Glume.[8] The same workshop created the vases on the balustrade, and the groups of cherubs above the windows of the dome. Atlantes in eclectic style, KanaÅ‚owa Str. ... A caryatid (also spelt Karyatid), is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... In Greek mythology, Maenads [MEE-nads] were female worshippers of Dionysus, the Greek god of mystery, wine and intoxication. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Stairs, staircase, stairway, flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ...

By contrast, the north entrance façade is more restrained. Segmented colonnades of 88 Corinthian columns—two deep—curve outwards from the palace building to enclose the semicircular cour d'honneur. As on the south side, a balustrade with sandstone vases decorates the roof of the main corps de logis. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1136x852, 174 KB) Picture Gallery at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1136x852, 174 KB) Picture Gallery at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... South side of the Picture Gallery The Picture Gallery in the park of Sanssouci palace in Potsdam was built in 1755-1764 during the reign of Frederick II of Prussia under the supervision of Johann Gottfried Büring. ... Stairs, staircase, stairway, flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ...


Flanking the corps de logis are two secondary wings, providing the large service accommodation and domestic offices necessary to serve an 18th-century monarch, even when in retreat from the world. In Frederick's time, these single-storey wings were covered with foliage to screen their mundane purpose. The eastern wing housed the secretaries', gardeners' and servants' rooms, while the west wing held the palace kitchen, stables and a remise (coach house).


Frederich regularly occupied the palace each summer throughout his lifetime, but after his death in 1786 it remained mostly unoccupied and neglected until the mid-19th century. In 1840, 100 years after Frederick's accession to the throne, his grand nephew Frederick William IV and his wife moved into the guest rooms. The royal couple retained the existing furniture and replaced missing pieces with furniture from Frederick's time. The room in which Frederick had died was intended to be restored to its original state, but this plan was never executed because of a lack of authentic documents and plans. However, the armchair in which Frederick had died was returned to the palace in 1843.


Frederick William IV, a draftsman interested in both architecture and landscape gardening, transformed the palace from the retreat of his reclusive great uncle into a fully functioning and fashionable country house. The small service wings were enlarged between 1840 and 1842. This was necessary because, while Frederick philosophised and played music at Sanssouci, he liked to live modestly without splendour. As he aged, his modesty developed into miserliness. He would not permit repairs to the outer façade and allowed them in the rooms only with great reluctance. This was ascribed to his wish that Sanssouci should only last his lifetime.[9] Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ...

The East Wing. The two service wings, virtually hidden from sight by foliage in the time of Frederick the Great, were remodelled in the 19th century by Frederick William IV, who transformed the palace into a more conventional royal residence for family and court use.
The East Wing. The two service wings, virtually hidden from sight by foliage in the time of Frederick the Great, were remodelled in the 19th century by Frederick William IV, who transformed the palace into a more conventional royal residence for family and court use.

The additions included a mezzanine floor to both wings. The kitchen was moved into the east wing. Frederick the Great's small wine cellar was enlarged to provide ample store rooms for the enlarged household, while the new upper floor provided staff bedrooms. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 898 KB) Summary Suse took this picture and has distributed it under GNU-FDL. He/She has also used it on the German Sanssouci article here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 898 KB) Summary Suse took this picture and has distributed it under GNU-FDL. He/She has also used it on the German Sanssouci article here. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... View of the ground floor of the Glaspaleis from the mezzanine View of the mezzanine in the lobby of the former Capitol Cinema, Ottawa, Canada In architecture, a mezzanine or entresol is an intermediate floor between main floors of a building, and therefore typically not counted among the overall floors... A Wine cellar is a storage room for wine in bottles or barrels, or more rarely in carboys, amphoras or plastic containers. ...


The west wing became known as "The Ladies' Wing", providing accommodation for ladies-in-waiting and guests. This was a common arrangement in mid-19th-century households, which often had a corresponding "Bachelor's Wing" for unmarried male guests and members of the household. The rooms were decorated with intricate boiseries, panelling and tapestries. This new accommodation for ladies was vital: entertaining at Sanssouci was minimal during the reign of Frederick the Great, and it is known that women were never entertained there, so there were no facilities for them.[7] Frederick had married Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Bevern in 1733, but separated from his wife after his accession to the throne in 1740. The Queen resided alone at Schönhausen Palace in Berlin after the separation, and Frederick preferred Sanssouci to be "sans femmes" (without women).[10] Lady in Waiting is an album by American southern rock band The Outlaws, released in 1976. ... Mentmore Towers The boiseries were from from the Hôtel de Villars, Paris, and are inset with paintings and Genoese velvet Boiserie (often used in the plural boiseries) is the term to used to define ornate and intricately carved panelling. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Elizabeth Christine by Antoine Pesne, 1739. ... Schönhausen Palace in Berlin Schönhausen Palace is a baroque palace in Berlins borough of Niederschönhausen in the administrative district of Pankow. ...


Interior of the palace

"The Flute Concert of Sanssouci" by Menzel, 1852, depicts Frederick the Great playing the flute in his music room at Sanssouci.
"The Flute Concert of Sanssouci" by Menzel, 1852, depicts Frederick the Great playing the flute in his music room at Sanssouci.

In the Baroque tradition, the principal rooms (including the bedrooms) are all on the piano nobile, which at Sanssouci was the ground floor by Frederick's choice. While the secondary wings have upper floors, the corps de logis occupied by the King occupies the full height of the structure. Comfort was also a priority in the layout of the rooms. The palace expresses contemporary French architectural theory in its apartement double ideals of courtly comfort, comprising two rows of rooms, one behind the other. The main rooms face the garden, looking southwards, while the servant's quarters in the row behind are on the north side of the building. An apartement double thus consists of a main room and a servant's chamber. Doors connect the apartments with each other. They are arranged as an "enfilade", so that the entire indoor length of the palace can be assessed at a glance. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1423, 306 KB) Description: Title: de: Flötenkonzert Friedrichs des Großen in Sanssouci Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 142 × 205 cm Country of origin: de: Deutschland Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Alte Nationalgalerie Other... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1423, 306 KB) Description: Title: de: Flötenkonzert Friedrichs des Großen in Sanssouci Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 142 × 205 cm Country of origin: de: Deutschland Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Alte Nationalgalerie Other... Adolph Friedrich Erdmann von Menzel ( 8 December 1815 - 9 February 1905) was a German artist noted for drawings, engravings, and paintings. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... ... Enfilade and defilade are military tactical concepts used to describe a fighting units exposure to enemy fire. ...


Frederick sketched his requirements for decoration and layout, and these sketches were interpreted by artists such as Johann August Nahl, the Hoppenhaupt brothers, the Spindler brothers and Johann Melchior Kambly, who all not only created works of art, but decorated the rooms in the Rococo style. While Frederick cared little about etiquette and fashion, he also wanted to be surrounded by beautiful objects and works of art. He arranged his private apartments according to his personal taste and needs, often ignoring the current trends and fashions. These "self-compositions" in Rococo art led to the term "Frederician Rococo".[11] Monument to Frederic II in Kassel, later completed by Nahls son Johann August Nahl (* 22 August 1710 in Berlin; † 22 October 1781 in Kassel) was a German sculptor and stuccist. ... Johann Melchior Kambly (born 1718, died 1783) was a German sculptor who took part in the development of the architectural style of Frederician Rococo. ... It has been suggested that Office etiquette be merged into this article or section. ... Frederican Rococo is a form of rococo, which developed in Prussia during the reign of Frederick the Great and combined influences from both France and the Netherlands. ...


The principal entrance area, consisting of two halls, the "Entrance Hall" and the "Marble Hall", is at the centre, thus providing common rooms for the assembly of guests and the court, while the principal rooms flanking the Marble Hall become progressively more intimate and private, in the tradition of the Baroque concept of state rooms. Thus, the Marble Hall was the principal reception room beneath the central dome. Five guest rooms adjoined the Marble Hall to the west, while the King's apartments lay to the east - an audience room, music room, study, bedroom, library, and a long gallery on the north side. A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ...


The palace is generally entered through the Entrance Hall, where the restrained form of the classical external colonnade was continued into the interior. The walls of the rectangular room were subdivided by ten pairs of Corinthian columns made of white stucco marble with gilded capitals. Three overdoor reliefs with themes from the myth of Bacchus reflected the vineyard theme created outside. Georg Franz Ebenhech was responsible for gilded stucco works. The strict classical elegance was relieved by a painted ceiling executed by the Swedish painter Johann Harper, depicting the goddess Flora with her acolytes, throwing flowers down from the sky. Stucco is a material made of an aggregate, a binder, and water which is applied wet, and hardens when it dries. ... A capital of the Composite order In Western architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, head) forms the crowning member of the column, which projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the square form of the latter with the circular shaft. ... Carved and inlaid Late Baroque supraporte in Toruń, Poland An overdoor (or supraporte) is the name given to a painting, bas-relief or decorative panel that is set within ornamental mouldings placed over a door in classicizing or Rococo interiors. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Georg Franz Ebenhech (c. ... In Roman mythology, Flora was a goddess of flowers and the season of spring. ...

Die Tafelrunde by Adolph von Menzel. The oval domed, "Marble Hall" is the principal reception room of the palace. On the left side, in the purple coat, sits Voltaire, the other guests are members of the Prussian Academy of Sciences
Die Tafelrunde by Adolph von Menzel. The oval domed, "Marble Hall" is the principal reception room of the palace. On the left side, in the purple coat, sits Voltaire, the other guests are members of the Prussian Academy of Sciences

The white-and-gold oval Marmorsaal ("Marble Hall"), as the principal reception room, was the setting for celebrations in the palace, its dome crowned by a cupola. White Carrara marble was used for the paired columns, above which stucco putti dangle their feet from the cornice. The dome is white with gilded ornament, and the floor is of Italian marble intarsia inlaid in compartments radiating from a central trelliswork oval. Three arch-headed windows face the garden; opposite them, in two niches flanking the doorway, figures of Venus Urania, the goddess of free nature and life, and Apollo, the god of the arts, by the French sculptor François Gaspard Adam, established the iconography of Sanssouci as a place where art was joined with nature. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (980x1181, 319 KB) Adolph von Menzel: Tafelrunde König Friedrich II. in Sanssouci mit Voltaire (links) und den führenden Köpfen der Berliner Akademie, 1850, ehem. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (980x1181, 319 KB) Adolph von Menzel: Tafelrunde König Friedrich II. in Sanssouci mit Voltaire (links) und den führenden Köpfen der Berliner Akademie, 1850, ehem. ... Adolph Friedrich Erdmann von Menzel ( 8 December 1815 - 9 February 1905) was a German artist noted for drawings, engravings, and paintings. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and provide ventilation. ... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue-gray marble quarried there. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... Simon Vouet, The Muses Urania and Calliope, c. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... François Gaspard Adam (Nancy, May 23, 1710 - Paris, August 18, 1761) was a French rococo sculptor. ...


The adjoining room served as both an audience room and the Dining Room. It is decorated with paintings by French 18th-century artists, including Jean-Baptiste Pater, Jean François de Troy, Pierre Jacques Cazes, Louis Silvestre, and Antoine Watteau. However, here, as in the majority of the rooms, the carved putti, flowers and books on the overdoor reliefs were the work of Glume, and the ceiling paintings emphasise the rococo spirit of the palace. This exuberant form of ornamentation of rococo, Rocaille, was used in abundance on the walls and ceiling in the music room. Much of the work was by the sculptor and decorator Johann Michael Hoppenhaupt (the elder). A 1746 fortepiano by Gottfried Silbermann which once belonged to Frederick the Great remains as a nostalgic reminder of the room's original purpose. Jean-Baptiste Pater: Die Freuden des Landlebens , 1730/35 Jean-Baptiste Pater (December 29, 1695-July 25, 1736) was a French rococo painter. ... A reading of Molière, Jean François de Troy, about 1728 Jean François de Troy (1679-1752) was a French roccoco painter and tapestry designer born on January 27, 1679 in Paris. ... Portrait of Israel Sylvestre by Charles Le Brun, 1670 Israel Silvestre (Nancy 13 August 1621 — Paris 11 October 1691), called the Younger to distinguish him from his father, was a prolific French draftsman, etcher and print dealer who specialized in topographical views and perspectives of famous buildings. ... Jean-Antoine Watteau (October 10, 1684 - July 18, 1721) was a French Rococo painter. ... The putto is a figure of a pudgy baby, almost always male, often naked and having wings, found especially in Italian Renaissance art. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Fortepiano by Paul McNulty after Walter & Sohn, ca. ... Gottfried Silbermann (January 14, 1683-August 4, 1753) was an influential German constructor of keyboard instruments. ...


The King's study and bedroom, remodelled after Frederick's death by Frederick William von Erdmannsdorff in 1786, it is now in direct contrast to the rococo rooms. Here, the clean and plain lines of classicism now rule. However, Frederick's desk and the armchair in which he died in were returned to the room in the middle of the 19th century. Portraits and once missing pieces of furniture from the Frederick's time have also since been replaced. Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Erdmannsdorff (18 May 1736 - 9 March 1800) was a German architect and architectural theoretician, and one of the most significant representatives of early German Neoclassicism. ...


The circular library deviated from the spatial structure of French palace architecture. The room is almost hidden, accessed through a narrow passageway from the bedroom, underlining its private character. Cedarwood was used to panel the walls and for the alcoved bookcases. The harmonious shades of brown augmented with rich gold-coloured Rocaille ornaments were intended to create a peaceful mood. Species Cedrus deodara Cedrus libani    var. ... Alcove (through the Spanish, alcova, from the Arabic, al-, the, and quobbah, a vault) is an architectural term for a recess in a room, usually screened off by pillars, balustrade or drapery. ... A bookcase filled with books A bookcase is an article of furniture, forming a shelved receptacle, usually perpendicular or horizontal, for the storage of books. ...


The bookcases contained approximately 2,100 volumes of Greek and Roman writings and historiographies and also a collection of French literature of the 17th and 18th centuries with a heavy emphasis on the works of Voltaire. The books were bound in brown or red goat leather and richly gilded. Historiography is a term with multiple meanings that has changed with time, place and observer, and is thus resistant to a single encompassing meaning. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The north facing gallery overlooked the forecourt. Here, again, Frederick deviated from French room design, which would have placed service rooms in this location. Recessed into the inner wall of this long room were niches containing marble sculptures of Greco-Roman deities. Five windows alternating with pier glasses on the outer wall reflect the paintings by Nicolas Lancret, Jean-Baptiste Pater and Antoine Watteau hung between the niches opposite. Florentine Renaissance painter Filippo Lippi placed his Madonna of the 1440s within a simulated shell-headed niche The niche in classical architecture is an exedra or an apse that has been reduced in size, retaining the half-dome heading usual for an apse. ... In modern Olympic and amateur wrestling, Greco-Roman wrestling is a particular style and variation. ... Nicolas Lancret (January 22, 1690 - September 14, 1743), French painter, was born in Paris, and became a brilliant depicter of light comedy which reflected the tastes and manners of French society under the regent Orleans. ... Jean-Baptiste Pater: Die Freuden des Landlebens , 1730/35 Jean-Baptiste Pater (December 29, 1695-July 25, 1736) was a French rococo painter. ... Jean-Antoine Watteau (October 10, 1684 - July 18, 1721) was a French Rococo painter. ...


To the west were the guest rooms in which were lodged those friends of the King considered intimate enough to be invited to this most private of his palaces. Two of Frederick's visitors were sufficiently distinguished and frequent that the rooms they occupied were named after them. The Rothenburg room is named after the Count of Rothenburg, who inhabited his circular room until his death in 1751. This room balances the palace architecturally with the library. The Voltaire Room was frequently occupied by the philosopher during his stay in Potsdam between 1750 and 1753.[12] The Voltaire Room was remarkable for its decoration, which gave it the alternative name of the "Flower Room". On a yellow lacquered wall panel were superimposed, colourful, richly adorned wood carvings. Apes, parrots, cranes, storks, fruits, flowers, garlands gave the room a cheerful and natural character. Johann Christian Hoppenhaupt (the younger) designed the room between 1752 and 1753 from sketches made by Frederick. In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ...


The terraced gardens

The terrace gardens, looking down from the palace, towards the park.
The terrace gardens, looking down from the palace, towards the park.

The panoramic vista of the garden of Sanssouci is the result of Frederick the Great's decision to create a terraced vineyard on the south slope of the hills of Bornstedt. The area had previously been wooded but the trees were felled during the reign of the "soldier-king" Frederick William I to allow the city of Potsdam to expand. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 585 KB) Summary By Trebor27trebor in 2005 of the gardens of Sanssouci from on the steps leading up to the palace. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 585 KB) Summary By Trebor27trebor in 2005 of the gardens of Sanssouci from on the steps leading up to the palace. ... Sanssouci Park around 1900 Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Panoramic photography. ... Look up terrace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The title Frederick William I was used by two rulers of the House of Hohenzollern Elector Frederick William I of Brandenburg (1620-1688) King Frederick William I of Prussia (1688-1740) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


On 10 August 1744, Frederick ordered the bare hillside to be transformed into terraced vineyards. Three wide terraces were created, with convex centres to maximise the sun light (see plan). On the partitions of the supporting walls, the brickwork is pierced by 168 glazed niches. Trellised vines from Portugal, Italy, France, and also from nearby Neuruppin, were planted against the brickwork, while figs grew in the niches. The individual parts of the terrace were further divided by strips of lawn, on which were planted yew trees. Low box hedging surrounded trellised fruit, making a circular ornamental parterre. In the middle of this "wheel", 120 steps (now 132) led downward further dividing the terraces into six. is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... Florentine Renaissance painter Filippo Lippi placed his Madonna of the 1440s within a simulated shell-headed niche The niche in classical architecture is an exedra or an apse that has been reduced in size, retaining the half-dome heading usual for an apse. ... A trellis is a frame-like structure on which vined plants can grow. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Neuruppin is a town in Brandenburg, Germany. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese... Species Taxus baccata - European Yew Taxus brevifolia - Pacific (or Western) Yew Taxus canadensis - Canadian Yew Taxus chinensis - Chinese Yew Taxus cuspidata - Japanese Yew Taxus floridana - Florida Yew Taxus globosa - Mexican Yew Taxus sumatrana - Sumatran Yew Taxus wallichiana - Himalayan Yew Taxus is a genus of yews, small coniferous trees or shrubs... Species About 70 species; see text Buxus is a genus of about 70 species in the family Buxaceae. ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ...

A trellised gazebo at Sanssouci.
A trellised gazebo at Sanssouci.

Below the hill, a Baroque ornamental garden, modelled on the parterre at Versailles, was constructed in 1745. The Great Fountain was built at the centre of this garden in 1748. Frederick never saw the fountain playing because the engineers employed in the construction had little understanding of the hydraulics involved. From 1750, marble statues were placed around the basin of the fountain. This again was a feature copied from Versailles: figures of Venus, Mercury, Apollo, Diana, Juno, Jupiter, Mars and Minerva, as well as allegorical portrayals of the four elements Fire, Water, Air and Earth. Venus and Mercury, the works of the sculptor Jean Baptiste Pigalle, and two groups of hunters, allegories of the elements (wind and water) by Lambert Sigisbert Adam, were presented by Versailles's owner, the French King Louis XV. The remaining figures came from the workshop of François Gaspard Adam, a renowned sculptor in Berlin. By 1764, the French Rondel, as it came to be known, was completed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1648x1210, 677 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Gitterpavillon at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci User:Trebor27trebor Sanssouci translation Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1648x1210, 677 KB) from de: by Benutzer:Suse - selbst fotografiert, Januar 2005 Gitterpavillon at Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Sanssouci User:Trebor27trebor Sanssouci translation Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... A large ass gazebo on the grounds of Iolani Palace, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA This gazebo inside the spacious Singapore Botanic Gardens also serves as a bandstand. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ... Table of Hydraulics and Hydrostatics, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... Venus de Milo, front. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... Several ancient Classical Element ideas exist. ... Adjectives: Venusian or (rarely) Cytherean Atmosphere Surface pressure: 9. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... Jean-Baptiste Pigalle (January 26, 1714 – August 28, 1785), French sculptor, was born in Paris. ... Lambert-Sigisbert Adam (October 10, 1700 – May 12, 1759), French sculptor, known as Adam l’aîné (the elder), was born in Nancy, son of scupltor Jacob-Sigisbert Adam. ... Louis XV King of France and Navarre Louis XV (February 15, 1710 - May 10, 1774), called the Well-Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was king of France from 1715 to 1774. ... François Gaspard Adam (Nancy, May 23, 1710 - Paris, August 18, 1761) was a French rococo sculptor. ...


Nearby was a kitchen garden, which Frederick William I had laid out sometime prior to 1715. The soldier-king jokingly gave this simple garden the name "My Marly",[13] in reference to the very similar garden at the summer residence of the Louis XIV in Marly-le-Roi. The traditional kitchen garden, also known as a potager, is a seasonally used space separate from the rest of the residential garden--the ornamental plants and lawn areas. ... Marly-le-Roi is a commune of the Yvelines département, in France. ...


In his plans for the grounds, Frederick attached great importance on the combination of both an ornamental and a practical garden, thus demonstrating his belief that art and nature should be united. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... “Natural” redirects here. ...


The Park

The Temple of Friendship: constructed south of the main avenue from 1768 to 1770 by Carl von Gontard in memory of Frederick the Great's favourite sister, Margravine Wilhelmine of Bayreuth. The building complements the Antique Temple, which lies due north of the alley.
The Temple of Friendship: constructed south of the main avenue from 1768 to 1770 by Carl von Gontard in memory of Frederick the Great's favourite sister, Margravine Wilhelmine of Bayreuth. The building complements the Antique Temple, which lies due north of the alley.
Main article: Sanssouci Park

Following the terracing of the vineyard and the completion of the palace, Frederick turned his attention to the landscaping of the greater vicinity of the palace and thus began the creation of Sanssouci Park. In his organisation of the park, Frederick continued what he had begun in Neuruppin and Rheinsberg.[14] A straight main avenue was laid out, ultimately 2.5 km long, beginning in the east at the 1748 obelisk and extended over the years to the New Palace, which marks its western end. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x657, 253 KB) Summary From the German wikipedia, uploaded there on 21 Sep. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x657, 253 KB) Summary From the German wikipedia, uploaded there on 21 Sep. ... The Temple of Friendship The Temple of Friendship (German: Freundschaftstempel) is a small, round temple in the western part of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. ... Carl von Gontard (born January 13, 1731 in Mannheim; died September 23, 1791 in WrocÅ‚aw) was a German architect; he worked primarily in Berlin, Potsdam, and Bayreuth. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine, Princess of Prussia (Berlin, July 3, 1709 - Bayreuth, October 14, 1758), was a daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia. ... Sanssouci Park around 1900 Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. ... Sanssouci Park around 1900 Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. ... Neuruppin is a town in Brandenburg, Germany. ... Rheinsberg is a town and a municipality in the Ostprignitz-Ruppin district, in Brandenburg, Germany. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris For other uses, see Obelisk (disambiguation). ...


Continuing the horticultural theme of the terraced gardens, 3,000 fruit trees were planted in the park, and greenhouses and nurseries laid out, producing oranges, melons, peaches and bananas. Statuary and obelisks were also erected, with representations of the goddesses Flora and Pomona. Frederick had several temples and follies erected in the same rococo style as the palace itself. Some were small houses which compensated for the lack of reception rooms in the palace itself. A greenhouse in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... A nursery is a place where plants are propagated, usually for sale as a business, though some gardeners and farmers keep private nurseries. ... Binomial name (L.) Osbeck Orange—specifically, sweet orange—refers to the citrus tree Citrus sinensis (syn. ... Melon is a term used for various members of the Cucurbitaceae family with fleshy fruits, or may specify the typically sweet-fruiting members, muskmelon and watermelon. ... Binomial name (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris For other uses, see Obelisk (disambiguation). ... Pomona, Nicolas Fouché, c. ...

The Chinese House, designed by Johann Gottfried Büring between 1755 and 1764; a pavilion in the Chinoiserie style: a mixture of rococo elements coupled with Oriental architecture.
The Chinese House, designed by Johann Gottfried Büring between 1755 and 1764; a pavilion in the Chinoiserie style: a mixture of rococo elements coupled with Oriental architecture.

Frederick invested heavily in a vain attempt to introduce a fountain system in Sanssouci Park, attempting to emulate the other great Baroque gardens of Europe. Hydraulics at this stage were still in their infancy, and despite the building of pumping houses and reservoirs, the fountains at Sanssouci remained silent and still for the next 100 years. The invention of the steam power solved the problems a century later, and thus the reservoir finally fulfilled its purpose.[15] From around 1842, the Prussian Royal family were finally able to marvel at such features as the Great Fountain below the vineyard terraces, shooting jets of water to a height of 38 metres. The pumping station itself became another garden pavilion, disguised as Turkish Mosque, with its chimney becoming a minaret. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x769, 369 KB) Summary Originally uploaded to the German Wikipedia by Stonx. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x769, 369 KB) Summary Originally uploaded to the German Wikipedia by Stonx. ... The Chinese House The Chinese House (German: Chinesische Haus) is a garden pavilion in Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. ... A free-standing garden pavilion, Hofgarten in Munich, Bavaria In architecture a pavilion (from French, pavillon) has two main significations. ... Chinese House (Potsdam) Chinoiserie refers to a European artistic style which reflects Chinese influence and is characterized through the use of fanciful imagery of an imaginary China, asymmetry and whimsical contrasts of scale, the use of lacquerlike materials and decoration. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The park was expanded under Frederick William III, and later under his son Frederick William IV. The architects Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Ludwig Persius built Charlottenhof Palace in the park on the site of a former farm house, and Peter Joseph Lenné was commissioned with the garden design. Broad meadows created visual avenues between Charlottenhof, the Roman Baths and the New Palace, and incorporated the follies such as the Temple of Friendship of Frederick the Great. The Old Museum in Berlin Karl Friedrich Schinkel (March 13, 1781 - October 9, 1841) was a German architect and painter. ... Babelsberg Castle in Potsdam-Babelsberg Ludwig Persius (15th February 1803-12th July 1845) was a Prussian architect and a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. ... Charlottenhof Palace is located southwest of Sanssouci, Potsdam. ... Peter Joseph Lenné (29 September 1789 — 23 January 1866) was a Prussian gardener and landscape architect from Bonn who worked in the German classicist style. ... The Roman Baths (Germ. ... Broadway Tower, Worcestershire, England The folly at Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire, England, built in the 1700s to resemble Gothic-era ruins In architecture, a folly is an extravagant, frivolous or fanciful building, designed more for artistic expression than for practicality. ... The Temple of Friendship The Temple of Friendship (German: Freundschaftstempel) is a small, round temple in the western part of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. ...


Sanssouci in modern times

The Dragon House was constructed between 1770 and 1772 in the Chinoiserie style on the northern edge of Sanssouci Park.
The Dragon House was constructed between 1770 and 1772 in the Chinoiserie style on the northern edge of Sanssouci Park.

After the First World War, and despite the end of the German monarchy, the palace remained in the possession of the Hohenzollern dynasty. It eventually came under the protection of the Prussian "Verwaltung der Staatlichen Schlösser und Gärten" (Administration of National Palaces and Gardens) on April 1, 1927.[16] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 72 KB) Summary Potsdam Drachenhaus, Blick von Süden; Foto selbst erstellt: Acf 2004; Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by Acf (07:10, 21. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 72 KB) Summary Potsdam Drachenhaus, Blick von Süden; Foto selbst erstellt: Acf 2004; Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by Acf (07:10, 21. ... The Dragon House from the South The Prussian King Frederick the Great ordered that the Dragon House (German Drachenhaus) be built on the southern slope of the Klausberg, which borders the northern edge of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. ... Chinese House (Potsdam) Chinoiserie refers to a European artistic style which reflects Chinese influence and is characterized through the use of fanciful imagery of an imaginary China, asymmetry and whimsical contrasts of scale, the use of lacquerlike materials and decoration. ... Sanssouci Park around 1900 Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The House of Hohenzollern is a German dynasty of electors, kings, and emperors of Prussia, Germany, and Romania. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


When air raids on Berlin began in the Second World War, the most notable works of art of the former imperial palaces were transferred for safety to Rheinsberg (Brandenburg) and Bernterode im Eichsfeld (Thuringia). The structure of the palace remained unscathed despite fierce fighting in the vicinity in 1945, but the ancient windmill, retained in the park by Frederick to add rustic charm, was destroyed.[17] Strategic bombing is a military strategem used in a total war style campaign that attempts to destroy the economic ability of a nation-state to wage war. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Rheinsberg is a town and a municipality in the Ostprignitz-Ruppin district, in Brandenburg, Germany. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... There are two German place names that have the name Bernterode in Eichsfeld in Thuringia: Bernterode (bei Heilbad Heiligenstadt) Bernterode (bei Worbis) This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... A Dutch tower windmill, sporting sails, surrounded by tulips A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ...


Following the end of the war, most of the items that had been moved to Rheinsberg were transferred as booty to the Soviet Union; only a small part was returned to the palace in 1958. The artistic pieces from Bernterode found by American soldiers were first shipped to Wiesbaden to the "Central Art Collecting Point" and in 1957 went to Charlottenburg palace in West Berlin. Wiesbaden is a city in central Germany. ... Schloss Charlottenburg, front view Schloss Charlottenburg is located in the Charlottenburg district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf area of Berlin. ... Boroughs of West Berlin West Berlin was the name given to the western part of Berlin between 1949 and 1990. ...


Compared to many similar buildings, the palace fared well during almost 50 years under Communist jurisdiction in East Germany. The Church of St. Saviour in Sacrow and the centre of Potsdam were neglected, and some of the historic centre of Potsdam was demolished. The Berliner Stadtschloss (Berlin City Palace), containing architectural work by Schinkel, Erdmannsdorff and Knobelsdorff was demolished in 1950. Sanssouci survived intact, and in 1986 was even used a motif on the 5 DDM banknote; it was the East German government that endeavoured to have Sanssouci placed on the list of World Heritage Sites. This was achieved in 1990 with the following citation: Located south of the Brandenburg village of Sacrow, Church of the Redeemer (German: Heilandskirche am Port von Sacrow) lies on shore of the Havel. ... The Berlin City Palace (German: Berliner Stadtschloss) was a palace in central Berlin, on Schlossplatz, next to Alexanderplatz. ... DDM can refer to any of the following: East German Mark, a former currency whose ISO code was DDM. Dharma Drum Mountain, a Buddhist educational foundation. ...

Sanssouci around 1900; this timeless view remains unchanged.
Sanssouci around 1900; this timeless view remains unchanged.

The palace and park of Sanssouci, often described as the "Prussian Versailles", are a synthesis of the artistic movements of the 18th Century in the cities and courts of Europe. That ensemble is a unique example of the architectural creations and landscape design against the backdrop of the intellectual background of monarchic ideas of the state.[6] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3512x2580, 3301 KB) Description Potsdam - Sanssouci Original image Photochrom print (color photo lithograph) Created between 1890 and 1905 Source Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Photochrom Prints Collection, reproduction number LC-DIG-ppmsca-00357. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3512x2580, 3301 KB) Description Potsdam - Sanssouci Original image Photochrom print (color photo lithograph) Created between 1890 and 1905 Source Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Photochrom Prints Collection, reproduction number LC-DIG-ppmsca-00357. ...

Following the reunification of Germany, the library of Frederick was returned in 1992 to its former home at Sanssouci. Thirty-six oil paintings followed between 1993 and 1995. In 1995, the Foundation of Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was formed. The organization's job is to administer and care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in Berlin and Brandenburg that are visited by over two million visitors annually from all over the world. This article is about the capital of Germany. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ...


Notes and References

  1. ^ Berliner Zeitung: Spröde Fassadengeschichten, 19 February 2003.
  2. ^ UNESCO World Heritage Sites
  3. ^ Potsdam from above.
  4. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg: The New Palace in Sanssouci Park.
  5. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg:"The New Palace at Sanssouci", Potsdam 2003, p. 3
  6. ^ a b UNESCO: Schlösser und Parks von Potsdam-Sanssouci (German)
  7. ^ a b c Powell, Nicolas. (Sanssouci - pages 95–101) "Great Houses of Europe". 1961. George Weidenfeld and Nicolson Ltd. London. ISBN 0-600-33843-6.
  8. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg: Schutz der Putten von Sanssouci (German).
  9. ^ Berliner Zeitung: Spröde Fassadengeschichten, 19th February 2003
  10. ^ Rempel, Gerhard: Frederick the Great
  11. ^ Berlin Brandenburg Film Commission: Architecture in Berlin and Brandenburg
  12. ^ Morley, John: The Works of Voltaire, A Contemporary Version, A Critique and Biography by John Morley, notes by Tobias Smollett, trans. William F. Fleming, section 1750
  13. ^ Saur, Wolfgang: Was von Preußen blieb (German), Junge Freiheit Verlag GmbH & Co, 23rd August 2002
  14. ^ Gardenvisit.com: Gardens in Middle Germany
  15. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg: Sanssouci Park
  16. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg: The foundation's history
  17. ^ Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin - Brandenburg: The Historical Windmill in Sanssouci Park
  • This article was originally based on a translation of the corresponding German-language Wikipedia article retrieved on March 12, 2006. However, it is much altered and changed from that article.

The Berliner Zeitung, founded in 1945, is an East German center-left daily newspaper based in Berlin. ... is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Sanssouci - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4858 words)
In the park, east of the palace, is the Sanssouci Picture Gallery, built from 1755 to 1764 under the supervision of the architect Johann Gottfried Büring.
Sanssouci survived intact, and in 1986 was even used a motif on the 5 DDM banknote; it was the East German government that endeavoured to have Sanssouci placed on the list of World Heritage Sites.
The palace and park of Sanssouci, often described as the "Prussian Versailles", are a synthesis of the artistic movements of the 18th Century in the cities and courts of Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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