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Encyclopedia > Sanlun
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Sanlun or literally Three Treatise School was a Chinese school of Buddhism based upon the Indian Madhyamaka tradition, founded by Nagarjuna. The name derives from the fact that three principal Madhyamikan texts were translated by Kumarajiva to form the basis for the tradition.


Chi-tsang was a famous Sanlun disciple.


In 625, the Korean monk Ekwan brought the Sanlun school to Japan, where it was known as Sanron.


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Sanlun - definition of Sanlun in Encyclopedia (97 words)
Sanlun or literally Three Treatise School was a Chinese school of Buddhism based upon the Indian Madhyamaka tradition, founded by Nagarjuna.
The name derives from the fact that three principal Madhyamikan texts were translated by Kumarajiva to form the basis for the tradition.
In 625, the Korean monk Ekwan brought the Sanlun school to Japan, where it was known as Sanron.
Buddhist philosophy, Chinese : Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online (487 words)
He also introduced the emptiness philosophy of Nāgārjuna’s Madhyamaka thought (see Buddhism, Mādhyamika: India and Tibet; Nāgārjuna), which in China came to be called the Three Treatise School (Sanlun) after the three Madhyamaka texts he translated: the Madhyamaka-kārikās, the Twelve Gate Treatise and Āryadeva’s One Hundred Verse Treatise.
His leading disciple, Seng Zhao (384–414), further popularized Madhyamaka thought by packaging it in an exquisite adoption of the literary style of Laozi (see Daodejing) and Zhuangzi, both of whom were extremely popular amongst literati at that time.
Sanlun thought continued to spread through the fifth through seventh centuries, greatly influencing other Buddhist schools.
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