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Encyclopedia > Sanford Stadium
Sanford Stadium
"Between the Hedges"

Location Sanford Dr
Athens, GA 30602
Broke ground 1928
Opened October 12, 1929
Owner University of Georgia
Operator University of Georgia
Surface Natural Grass
Construction cost $360,000 USD
Architect TC Atwood
Tenants
Georgia Bulldogs (NCAA) (1929-Present)
Seats
92,746

Sanford Stadium is the on-campus playing venue for football at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. The 92,746-seat stadium is the fifth largest on-campus stadium in the NCAA. Architecturally, the stadium is known for the fact that its numerous expansions over the years have been carefully planned to fit with the existing "look" of the stadium. Games played there are said to be played "Between the Hedges" due to the privet hedges, which have stood around the field since its opening day in 1929. Image File history File linksMetadata SanfordStadium. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is located approximately 70 miles north-east of Atlanta in Athens, Georgia, and is the largest institution of higher learning and research in the State of Georgia. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is located approximately 70 miles north-east of Atlanta in Athens, Georgia, and is the largest institution of higher learning and research in the State of Georgia. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... University of Georgia athletics logo The University of Georgia (UGA) features one of the nations premier athletic programs, competing in the Southeastern Conference. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is located approximately 70 miles north-east of Atlanta in Athens, Georgia, and is the largest institution of higher learning and research in the State of Georgia. ... Athens is a city in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... Telstra Stadium in Sydney, Australia is capable of being converted from a rectangular rugby football field to an oval for cricket and Australian rules football games A modern stadium (plural stadiums or stadia in English) is a place, or venue, for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts or other events, consisting of... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Species See text Privet was originally the name for the European semi-evergreen shrub Ligustrum vulgare, and later also for the more reliably evergreen Ligustrum ovalifolium (Japanese privet), used extensively for privacy hedging (hence privet, private). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents

History

An early major force behind UGA athletics, the stadium's namesake, Dr. Steadman Vincent Sanford, arrived at the university as an English instructor in 1903. He later became the faculty representative to the athletics committee and would eventually become president of the University and Chancellor of the entire University System of Georgia. In 1911, he moved the university's football venue from its first location, Herty Field, to a location at the center of campus which was named Sanford Field in his honor. Steadman Vincent Sanford (August 24, 1871 – September 15, 1945), was President of the University of Georgia (UGA) in Athens from 1932 until 1935. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The University System of Georgia (USG) is the organizational body that includes all public institutions of higher learning in Georgia. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...


In those early years of football, Georgia played a series of controversial games against in-state rival Georgia Tech. Tech's Grant Field in Atlanta held thousands of spectators, and Georgia was forced to play those match-ups almost exclusively at Tech's stadium. Sanford wanted Georgia to have a venue that would equal Tech's, and the "final straw" came in 1927 when UGA's undefeated (9-0) team traveled to Tech and lost 12-0. It was alleged that Tech watered the field all night to slow UGA's running backs. Afterwards, Sanford vowed to "build a stadium bigger than Tech," and play the game at Athens every other year. The Georgia Institute of Technology, or Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational university located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and part of the University System of Georgia. ... Bobby Dodd Stadium is the football stadium located on the campus of Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Nickname: Hotlanta, The Big Peach, The ATL, A-Town Location in Fulton County in the state of Georgia Coordinates: Country United States State Georgia Counties Fulton, Dekalb Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area    - City 343. ...


To fund his vision, Sanford had an idea that members of the athletic association would sign notes guaranteeing a bank loan to fund the stadium construction. Those guarantors would be granted lifetime seats. The response was overwhelming, and in 1928 a loan of $150,000 supported by fans and alumni allowed construction to begin on a stadium whose total cost was $360,000. 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Near the existing Sanford Field was a low area between the Old Campus (to the north) and the Ag Campus (to the south) with a small creek (Tanyard Creek) running through it, creating a clearly preferable choice for the locaiton of the new stadium. This natural valley containing Tanyard Creek would result in reduced costs, as stands could be built on the rising sides of the hill, while the creek could be enclosed in a concrete culvert, on top of which the field would be constructed. The architect for the stadium was TC Atwood of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where North Carolina's Kenan Stadium had just been completed with a similar design. The 30,000 seat stadium was built in large part with convict labor, as were many public works projects of that era. Nickname: The Southern Part of Heaven Location in North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area    - City 51. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Kenan Stadium is a stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ...


The stadium was completed on time, and UGA convinced perennial powerhouse Yale, with whom the University had historically maintained close ties, to be their first opponent in the new stadium. (This also was Yale's first ever football game played in the South.) On October 12, 1929, a capacity crowd of 30,000+ paid $3.00 per ticket to watch the Georgia Bulldogs, under coach Harry Mehre, beat Yale 15-0 in Sanford Stadium's dedication game. Yale donated its half of the game receipts to UGA to help pay off the construction loans, which would subsequently be completely repaid in just five years. Dr. Sanford also was at this game, and attended many Georgia games at the stadium named in his honor until his death on September 15, 1945. Yale redirects here. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harry J. Mehre (September 18, 1901 in Huntington, Indiana - September 27, 1978 in Atlanta, Georgia) was an American athlete and football coach. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


"Between The Hedges"

Sanford Stadium's famous hedges have encircled the field since the stadium's very first game against Yale in 1929. The idea to put hedges around the field came from the Business Manager of the UGA Athletic Department, Charlie Morton. Morton claimed to have received inspiration for the idea during a visit to the Rose Bowl, where he saw the hedge of roses in that stadium. Roses were not a suitable choice for the climate in Athens, so privet hedges were used instead. Yale redirects here. ... The Rose Bowl is a stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, California. ... Athens is a city in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ...


There is a disagreement as to the exact type of hedge planted at Sanford Stadium. The UGA Media Guide claims that the hedge is an "English privet hedge."[1] A county extension agent in Athens, however, claims online that the hedge is composed of Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense[2]. Species See text Privet was originally the name for the European semi-evergreen shrub Ligustrum vulgare, and later also for the more reliably evergreen Ligustrum ovalifolium (Japanese privet), used extensively for privacy hedging (hence privet, private). ...


In addition to being a cosmetic touch, the hedges have proven to be an effective (though perhaps unintended) measure of crowd control, as well. Even though a major traffic path to exit the stadium from both stands runs directly alongside the hedges, fans have only stormed the field and torn down the goal-posts once in the entire history of Sanford Stadium. French mobile gendarmes doing riot control. ...


Stadium Expansions

In 1940, field-level lights were added, and Georgia played its first night game against Kentucky to a 7-7 tie. Six thousand seats were also added to the south side of the stadium in 1949, bringing total capacity to 36,000 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... The University of Kentucky (also as UK or simply Kentucky) is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ...


During the 1960s, many universities in the South were significantly expanding their stadiums, and Georgia was no different. Soon after the arrival of head coach Vince Dooley in 1964, UGA began updating Sanford Stadium, removing the field-level lighting (which obstructed views from the stands) and adding 7,621 temporary end-zone seats, which brought total capacity to 43,621. Architects Heery and Heery of Atlanta were then hired to plan a major expansion. This expansion planning was very tricky, since by that time the stadium was closely enclosed on both north and south sides by academic buildings. The plans went forward, however, and an "upper deck" of seats was added to each side of the stadium in 1967 without the need to demolish or alter any of the surrounding buildings. In addition to the new upper decks, this first major addition included a new pressbox and club seating. In total, 19,640 seats were added to the stadium (bringing total capacity to 59,000), at a cost of $3,000,000. The new addition was christened with a victory over Mississippi State in 1967. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles northeast of Jackson and 23 miles west of Columbus. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


In 1981, the east endzone stands were enclosed for a cost of $11.5 million, creating a "horshoe-shaped" stadium and eliminating the free view enjoyed by the "Track People". This addition added 19,000 seats, bringing total stadium capacity to 82,122. The first game in the newly-expanded stadium was on September 5, 1981, against Tennessee, with Georgia delivering a 44-0 drubbing. 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system. ...


Lights were re-installed in the stadium in 1982. This time, the lights were not located at field level, but attached to the top of the upper level, thus not obscuring fans' views of the field. The first game under the "new lights" was a 13-7 victory against Clemson on September 6, 1982. 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ...


In 1991, a portion of the west endzone stands was enclosed, creating a "partial bowl" around the lower level of Sanford Stadium. The west stands could not be completely enclosed due to the proximity of Gillis Bridge (usually called "Sanford Bridge"), a major campus transportation artery, to the stadium. This expansion cost $3.7 million and added 4,205 new seats, bringing total capacity to 85,434. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Thirty luxury suites were added above the south stands in 1994, and were expanded to 50 suites in 2000. These expansions cost a total of $18 million, and raised total capacity to 86,520. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


The most recent major addition to Sanford Stadium was in 2003, when another upper deck was added to the north side of the stadium. This added 5,500 new seats to the stadium at a cost of $25 million, bringing total stadium capacity to 92,058. Currently, most of these "upper-upper deck" seats are reserved for the fans of the visiting team. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The stadium reached its current capacity of 92,746 in 2004, when 27 SkySuites were added to the North side of the stadium at a cost of $8 million. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable Sanford Stadium Games

  • October 12th, 1929: The first game played at Sanford Stadium - Georgia upset heavily-favored Yale 15-0.
  • October 26th, 1940: The first night game at Sanford Stadium - Georgia and Kentucky play to a 7-7 tie.
  • September 9th, 1965: The Bulldogs upset Bear Bryant's 1965 Alabama Crimson Tide team 18-17 on a last second, controversial flea-flicker play. Alabama would win the national championship that season, with a final record of 9-1-1
  • September 13th, 1980: Georgia begins a streak of 24 consecutive home wins (a school record) by defeating Texas A&M 42-0. The Dawgs would go on to win the national title in the 1980 season. This was also the home debut for Herschel Walker.
  • September 22nd, 1984: Playing against second-ranked Clemson, the Dawgs win 26-23 on a last-second 60-yard field goal by Kevin Butler.

Paul William Bear Bryant (September 11, 1913 – January 26, 1983) was an American college football coach. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA, or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... Herschel Walker (born March 3, 1962 in Wrightsville, Georgia) was a professional American football player in the United States Football League and later, the National Football League. ...

1996 Summer Olympics

The stadium played host to the Olympic medal competition of men's and women's Olympic football (soccer) at the 1996 Summer Olympics. Because the required dimensions of a soccer field are larger than for an American football field, the hedges surrounding the field needed to be removed. This proved to be a controversial measure, as it had not been general public knowledge that the hedges would have to be removed to accommodate the Olympic football competition. In preparation for this necessity, cuttings were taken from the original hedges and cultivated at a secret off-site location for three years prior to the Olympics. During the Olympics, Nigeria and the United States would win the men's and women's football gold medals, respectively, at the hedge-less stadium. Once the Olympics were over, the newly-grown hedges were transplanted from their off-site location to the stadium. Participants The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Participants The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ...


Trivia

  • One unique attribute of Sanford Stadium is Georgia's deceased mascots (UGAs I-V, all descendants of the original white English bulldog) are actually buried or entombed within the stadium's east end zone.
  • The Georgia "G" logo marks the goal line, making Sanford Stadium one of the few stadiums to mark the goal line with a "G" on the field.
  • Sanford Stadium is also one of the few college stadiums in which the football field is oriented to face East-West as opposed to North-South. Many of UGA's opponents have found it difficult for players to see as the West Endzone is still open and the sun shines in the faces of the players, although both teams face the sun during the game.
  • Up until the end of the era of rail travel, executives of the Central of Georgia Railway Co. would park the company president's luxury office rail car on the tracks overlooking the stadium's open east end zone for an excellent view of the spectacle. With food served on china by white-coated porters to the Central of Georgia executives and their guests, the rail car "Atlanta" could be considered Sanford Stadium's original luxury skybox.
  • In the 1970s, a multitude of fans began watching Georgia games from the railroad tracks that overlooked the stadium's open east endzone. These "Track People," as they came to be known, were able to watch the game for free, and became a tradition. The 1981 expansion of the stadium, however, enclosed the east endzone stands, eliminating the view of the field from the railroad tracks and effectively ending the "Track People" tradition.
  • Georgia's fans have only rushed the field and torn down the goal posts once in the stadium's history. This happened on October 7, 2000, after the Bulldogs beat rival Tennessee for the first time since 1988 with a fourth quarter touchdown. This statistic is usually credited to the fact that the hedges serve not only cosmetic purposes, but also help with crowd control. Aiding this cause is the fact that the hedges surround, and largely conceal, a low chainlink fence running through their branches around the field's entirety.
  • The hedges surrounding the stadium are quite frequently replanted between football seasons, especially in the area around the northwest endzone corner. The northwest endzone area is where the visiting fans with lower-level tickets are seated, and fans of Georgia's most-hated rivals (especially Auburn and Georgia Tech) are known to decimate the hedges by taking home "souvenirs" after each game they play at Sanford Stadium.

Mascots at the Mascot Olympics in Orlando, Florida. ... Uga V on the cover of Sports Illustrated. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... French mobile gendarmes doing riot control. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, in the United States. ... Georgia Institute of Technology The Georgia Institute of Technology, or Georgia Tech, is located in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. With over 16,000 students, Georgia Tech is one of four public research universities in the University System of Georgia. ...

See also

Georgia Bulldogs Football refers to the Georgia Bulldogs Football team, of the University of Georgia at Athens, Georgia. ...

External link

  • Official UGA Athletics page for Sanford Stadium

References

  1. ^ http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1407.pdf
  2. ^ http://county.ces.uga.edu/clarke/Betweenthehedges0899.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sanford Stadium - GeorgiaDogs.com—Official Athletic Site of the University of Georgia (389 words)
With a $25 million expansion completed in 2003 and another $8 million in 2004, Sanford Stadium added a second upper deck on the north side and 27 new north side SkySuites bringing the new stadium capacity to 92,746--the fifth largest on-campus stadium in the country.
Sanford Stadium is widely known as the greatest spectator stadium in the South and surrounded by its famous hedges, Georgia's home field is one of the legendary facilities in college football.
Sanford, former president of the University and Chancellor of the University system, Georgia's Sanford Stadium marked its 75th anniversary in 2004.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Steadman V. Sanford (1871-1945) (784 words)
Steadman Vincent Sanford was born on August 24, 1871, in Covington to Elizabeth Steadman and Charles Vincent Sanford.
Sanford received his undergraduate degree from Mercer University in Macon in 1890, and went on to pursue graduate studies at the University of Chicago, the University of Berlin in Germany, and Oxford University in England.
Sanford's role in journalism education led to the establishment of the George Foster Peabody Award for excellence in broadcasting, one of the university's most widely recognized distinctions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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