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Encyclopedia > Sandringham House
Sandringham House, Norfolk, England
Sandringham House, Norfolk, England

Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham in Norfolk, England, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. The house is on the royal Sandringham Estate, which lies within the Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1146x722, 237 KB) Summary Sandringham House, Norfolk photographed by RXUYDC on June 6, 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1146x722, 237 KB) Summary Sandringham House, Norfolk photographed by RXUYDC on June 6, 2005. ... A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. ... Sandringham is a village and civil parish in the north of the English county of Norfolk. ... Norfolk (pronounced ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government; the Countryside Council for Wales on behalf of the Welsh Assembly Government...


The site has been occupied since Elizabethan times, and in 1771 architect Cornish Henley cleared the site to build Sandringham Hall. The hall was modified during the 19th century by Charles Spencer Cowper, a stepson of Lord Palmerston, who added an elaborate porch and conservatory, designed by architect Samuel Sanders Teulon. The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, KG, GCB, PC (20 October 1784 – 18 October 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Samuel Sanders Teulon (1812-1873) was a notable English architect of the 19th century. ...


In 1862, the hall was purchased by Queen Victoria at the request of the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII) as a home for himself and his new bride Alexandra. In 1865 however, two years after moving in, the hall's size proved insufficient for the prince's needs, and he commissioned A J Humbert to raze the hall and create a larger building. Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ...


The resulting red-brick house was completed in late 1870 in a peculiar mix of styles that is generally looked upon as not the most successful of mid-Victorian country house designs. This section incorporated the galleried entrance hall which is used by the royal family for entertaining and family occasions. A new wing was later added to one end of the house in a more traditional style, incorporating a ball room, and this wing is generally regarded a more coherent design. The architecture may be unremarkable, but it was ahead of its time in other ways, with gas lighting, flushing water closets, and even an early form of shower. One part of the house was destroyed in a fire during the preparations for Prince Albert Edward's 50th birthday in 1891, and later rebuilt. Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ... Flush toilet A flush toilet or water closet is a toilet that disposes of the waste products by using water to sweep them away down a drainpipe. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...

Sandringham House circa 1880.
Sandringham House circa 1880.

Sandringham House has been the private home of four generations of Sovereigns. Although doubtful at first, Princess Alexandra came to love Sandringham. The main features of the new building were bay windows, which helped lighten the interior. The new building was designed with the family's comfort in mind and was never intended to be an architectural statement in the way some royal homes have been. Despite the size of Sandringham and the spaciousness of the main rooms, the living quarters were quite cramped.


Edward and Alexandra's sons, Prince Albert Victor and Prince George, for example, had very small bedrooms. The spacious grounds, however, provided room for Queen Alexandra's growing menagerie of horses, dogs, cats, farmyard turkeys, and other animals - including a large but gentle ram rescued from an Egyptian butcher. The animals of course enchanted the children and in turn her grandchildren. The children of King George V used to love to visit Sandringham and their grandparents. A stuffed baboon in the great hall with a tray for calling cards was another favorite of the children. Both but especially Queen Alexandra loved to dote on them. The atmosphere was far different from at home, especially when their father was about. The kennels were a particular delight to the children. Since the death of Edward VII, Sandringham has been used as a popular holiday retreat for successive members of the Royal Family. This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Since King George VI died in 1952 at Sandringham, Queen Elizabeth's custom has been to spend the anniversary of her father's death and her own Accession privately with her family at the House. It is her official base until February each year. The house was first opened to the public in 1977, and there is a museum with displays of Royal life and Estate history. George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...

York Cottage
York Cottage

The estate has long been a favourite of the Royal Family, who still spend each New Year in the house. It is also an excellent location for shooting and is used for royal shooting parties. Such was Edward VII's fondness for hunting on the estate, he ordered all the clocks to be set half an hour ahead of GMT to allow more time for the sport. This tradition of Sandringham Time was kept on the estate from 1901 until 1936 when the new King Edward VIII showed he was "a new broom" by sweeping the custom away. Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... GMT redirects here. ... Sandringham time is the name given to the idiosyncratic alterations that King Edward VII made to the timekeeping at the royal estate of Sandringham. ...


The estate is also home to York Cottage, built by Edward VII soon after he moved in, and a favourite of George V. Diana, Princess of Wales was born at Park House in 1961.[1] Anmer Hall on the grounds is a Georgian house that was at one point the country home of the Duke of Kent. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Anmer Hall is situated in the Norfolk village of Anmer in England, about two miles east of The Queens residence at Sandringham. ... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ...


Along with Balmoral Castle, Sandringham House is the private property of the British royal family and not part of the royal estate. Their succession became an issue in 1936, when Edward VIII abdicated as king. Being legacies Edward had inherited from his father, George V, the estates did not automatically pass to his younger brother George VI on abdication. George had to explicitly purchase Balmoral and Sandringham from Edward so that they could remain private retreats for the monarch's family. Balmoral Castle. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the Crown Estate is a property portfolio associated with the monarchy. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... The Instrument of Abdication signed by Edward VIII and his three brothers The Edward VIII abdication crisis refers to events which occurred in 1936, when King-Emperor Edward VIII of the British Empire precipitated a constitutional crisis throughout his realms by his desire to marry his mistress, Mrs. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ...


See also Wood Farm. Set in a secluded corner of the Sandringham Estate, Norfolk, England is Wood Farm, a modest cottage. ...


King Olav V of Norway was born at Sandringham. His Majesty King Olav V (July 2, 1903 - January 17, 1991) reigned as King of Norway from 1957 to 1991. ...


Queen Alexandra, her son George V, and grandson George VI all died at Sandringham. This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ...

  • Empress Victoria of Germany, daughter of Queen Victoria and mother of Kaiser Wilhelm II, had a country house built at Friedrichshof, near Kronberg, in the style of Sandringham.

References

  1. ^ Robinson, Eugene, "From Sheltered Life to Palace Life, of Her Own", Washington Post, September 1, 1997.

Eugene Robinson (born 1955) is a newspaper columnist and assistant managing editor for The Washington Post. ... ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sandringham House
  • Website of the Sandringham Estate
  • The Royal Residences- Sandringham house

Coordinates: 52°49′47″N, 0°30′50″E This is a list of residences occupied by the British Royal family, noting the seasons of the year they are traditionally occupied. ... Bagshot Park circa 1880. ... Balmoral Castle. ... Birkhall is a 53,000 acre estate in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... Gatcombe Park is the private country home of Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, situated between the Gloucestershire villages of Minchinhampton and Avening, five miles south of Stroud. ... Highgrove is the country home of HRH The Prince of Wales, in Gloucestershire. ... The official entrance of Hillsborough Castle Hillsborough Castle in County Down is a mansion in Northern Ireland. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... 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Brantridge Park, Balcombe, West Sussex, is one of the lesser royal residences. ... Coppins was originally a mid-nineteenth century farmhouse built by John Mitchell. ... Built 1650 in Windsor Great Park, south of Royal Lodge, Cumberland Lodge was called Byfield House till 1670. ... Dunfermline Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Dunfermline, Fife. ... Eltham Palace Eltham Palace is a large house in Eltham, London, United Kingdom (Map Ref: TQ424740 , ), currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... Falkland Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Falkland, Fife. ... Fort Belvedere Fort Belvedere is a country house on Shrubs Hill in Windsor Great Park, very near Sunningdale, Berkshire, but actually over the border in the borough of Runnymede in Surrey. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Three buildings at Kew, which is now a western suburb of London, have been known as Kew Palace. ... 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Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... The Queens House, Greenwich The Queens House, Greenwich, was designed and begun in 1616-1617 by architect Inigo Jones for Anne of Denmark (the queen of King James I of England) and completed, also by Jones, about 1635 for Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I. The... A former royal residence at Windlesham, Surrey. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... Brighton Pavilion redirects here. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... White Lodge is a Georgian house situated in Richmond Park, on the outskirts of London. ... Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the Oxfordshire town of Woodstock. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
English Monarchs - Kings and Queens of England - Sandringham House. (657 words)
The Sandringham estate in Norfolk was purchased by Queen Victoria for £22,000 in 1863, intended as the home of her eldest son and heir, Albert Edward, the future Edward VII.
Sandringham was to witness the death of Bertie's eldest son and heir, Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence.
The gardens of Sandringham House are entered through elaborate wrought iron gates, known as the Norwich gates, which were given as a wedding present to the Prince and Princess of Wales in 1863.
Sandringham House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (831 words)
Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family.
The resulting red-brick house was completed in late 1870 in a peculiar mix of styles that is generally looked upon as not the most successful of mid-Victorian country house designs.
One part of the house was destroyed in a fire during the preparations for Prince Albert Edward's 50th birthday in 1891, and later rebuilt.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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