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Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus 'holy'). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i.e. made holy. Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... In various religions, sacred (from Latin, sacrum, sacrifice) or holy, objects, places or concepts are believed by followers to be intimately connected with the supernatural, or divinity, and are thus greatly revered. ... Latin is an ancient [[Indo-European languages|Indo-well as the Roman CEuropean language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


The concept of sanctification is widespread among religions, but is perhaps especially common among the various branches of the Christian religion. The term can be used to refer to objects which are set apart for special purposes, but the most common use within Christian theology is in reference to the change brought about by God in a believer, begun at the point of salvation or justification and continuing throughout the life of the believer. Many forms of Christianity believe that this process will only be completed in Heaven, but some believe that complete holiness is possible in this life. Protestants call the completion of sanctification "glorification". Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... It has been suggested that Christian theological controversy be merged into this article or section. ... In religion, salvation refers to being saved from an undesirable state or condition. ... In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of making or declaring a sinner righteous before God. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ...


In many branches of Christianity, inanimate objects as well as people can be sanctified. A notable instance is the process of transubstantiation, which in Roman Catholic doctrine means that the bread and wine of Communion are physically transformed into the flesh and blood (respectively) of Jesus. This act constitutes a kind of sanctification of the bread and wine. Transubstantiation (from Latin transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ, the change that according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church occurs in the Eucharist. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


The term has gathered special uses by the different Christian denominations. For Protestants, the concept of sanctification is tied closely to grace and the term is usually reserved for reference to people rather than objects. A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favor of God for humankind, as manifest in the blessings bestowed upon all —irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ...


In the contemporary Holiness movement, the understanding that holiness is relational is growing. In relational holiness, the core notion is love. Other notions of holiness, such as purity, being set apart, perfection, keeping rules, and total commitment, are seen as contributory notions of holiness. These contributory notions find their ultimate legitimacy one when love is at their core (Thomas Jay Oord and Michael Lodahl). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Michael Lodahl is a Church of the Nazarene theologian. ...

Contents

Biblical references

  • Leviticus 11:44 - "...you shall be holy; for I am holy..." (NKJV)
  • Psalm 119:32 - "I will run the course of Your commandments, For You shall enlarge my heart." (NKJV)
  • Psalm 130:4 - "But there is forgiveness with You, That You may be feared." (NKJV)
  • Matthew 5:48 - "You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect." (ESV)
  • John 15:5 - "...He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing." (NKJV)
  • John 3:30 - "He must become greater; I must become less." (NIV)
  • Romans 6:22 - "But now that you have been freed from sin and enslaved to God, the advantage you get is sanctification." (NRSV)
  • Acts 15:9 - "...purifying their hearts by faith." (NKJV)
  • 1 Corinthians 1:30 - "But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption" (KJV)
  • 1 Corinthians 6:11 - "...But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God." (NRSV)
  • 2 Corinthians 3:18 - "But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord." (NKJV)
  • 2 Corinthians 7:1 - "...beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God." (NKJV)
  • 1 Thessalonians 4:3 - "For this is the will of God, your sanctification..." (NRSV)
  • 1 Thessalonians 4:7 - "For God did not call us to impurity but in holiness." (NRSV)
  • 1 Thessalonians 5:23 - "May the God of peace himself sanctify you wholly; and may your spirit and soul and body be kept sound and blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ." (RSV)
  • Hebrews 6:1 - "Therefore leaving the principles of the doctrine of Christ, let us go on unto perfection..." (KJV)
  • Hebrews 12:14 - "Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord." (NRSV)
  • James 1:4 - "And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing." (ESV)
  • 1 Peter 1:15-16 - "...but, as the One who called you is holy, you also are to be holy in all your conduct; for it is written, 'Be holy, because I am holy'..." (HCSB)
  • 1 John 4:18 - "There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love." (ESV)

Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... English Standard Version The English Standard Version (ESV) is an English translation of the Holy Bible, published in the United States by Crossway Books, and in the United Kingdom by Harper-Collins UK. The first edition was completed in 2001. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the epistles, or letters, included in the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ... (Redirected from 2 Corinthians) See also: First Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... (Redirected from 2 Corinthians) See also: First Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... Fear of God or F.O.G. is a Switzerland legendary Grindcore band, from the middle of 80´s. ... The New King James Version (NKJV) is a modern Bible translation, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc. ... (Redirected from 1 Thessalonians) The Epistles to the Thessalonians, also known as the Letters to the Thessalonians, are two books from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ... (Redirected from 1 Thessalonians) The Epistles to the Thessalonians, also known as the Letters to the Thessalonians, are two books from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ... (Redirected from 1 Thessalonians) The Epistles to the Thessalonians, also known as the Letters to the Thessalonians, are two books from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The Revised Standard Version (RSV) is an English translation of the Bible that was popular in the mid-20th century and posed the first serious challenge to the King James Version (KJV) owing to its aim to be both a readable and literally accurate modern English translation of the Bible. ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ... The Epistle of James is a book in the Christian New Testament canon. ... English Standard Version The English Standard Version (ESV) is an English translation of the Holy Bible, published in the United States by Crossway Books, and in the United Kingdom by Harper-Collins UK. The first edition was completed in 2001. ... (Redirected from 1 Peter) In Christianity, the First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. ... The Holman Christian Standard Bible is an English-language Bible translation, first published with the complete Old and New Testaments in March 2004. ... (Redirected from 1 John) The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... English Standard Version The English Standard Version (ESV) is an English translation of the Holy Bible, published in the United States by Crossway Books, and in the United Kingdom by Harper-Collins UK. The first edition was completed in 2001. ...

Orthodox Christianity

Orthodox Christianity believes in the doctrine of theosis, whereby humans take on divine properties. One of the key scriptures which is used in support of this doctrine is 2 Peter 1:4, which says, "Thus he has given us, through these things, his precious and very great promises, so that through them you may escape from the corruption that is in the world because of lust, and may become participants of the divine nature." (NRSV) Athanasius, writing from the fourth century, states that Christ "assumed humanity that we might become God."[1]. Often this phrase is translated as "God became man that man might become God." The essence of this is not that man becomes divine, but that man in Christ is enabled to partake of the divine nature. The doctrine of theosis needs to be understood in the view of salvation expressed in the Eastern Orthodox Church. The Eastern Orthodox view of salvation is about God's image being restored in man. "This is more than the customary Protestant concept of sanctification, however. In theosis, while there is no ontological change of humanity into deity, there is a very real impartation of the divine life to the whole human being--body and soul."[2]. Orthodox Christianity is a generalized reference to the Eastern traditions of Christianity, as opposed to the Western traditions (which descend through, or alongside of, the Roman Catholic Church) or the Eastern Rite Catholic churches. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis, meaning divinization (or deification or, to become god), is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a religious organization which claims to be the continuation of the original Christian body, founded by Jesus and his Twelve Apostles. ...

  1. ^ Athanasius: "On the Incarnation," Crestwood: Saint Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1989. p.93
  2. ^ Robert V. Rakestraw: "On Becoming God: An Evangelical Doctrine of Theosis," Journal of Evangelical Theological Society 40/2 (June 1997) 257-269

Roman Catholicism

Sanctifcation is the act of sanctifying according to the Roman Catholic encyclopedia : "The term "sanctity" is employed in somewhat different senses in relation to God, to individual men, and to a corporate body. As applied to God it denotes that absolute moral perfection which is His by nature. In regard to men it signifies a close union with God, together with the moral perfection resulting from this union. Hence holiness is said to belong to God by essence, and to creatures only by participation. Whatever sanctity they possess comes to them as a Divine gift. As used of a society, the term means that this society aims at producing holiness in its members, and is possessed of means capable of securing that result, and that the lives of its members correspond, at least in some measure, with the purpose of the society, and display a real, not a merely nominal holiness.


The Church has ever claimed that she, as a society, is holy in a transcendent degree. She teaches that this is one of the four "notes", viz., unity, catholicity, apostolicity, and sanctity, by which the society founded by Christ can be readily distinguished from all human institutions. It is in virtue of her relation to the Person and work of Christ that this attribute belongs to the Church. She is (1) the fruit of the Passion -- the kingdom of the redeemed. Those who remain outside her are the "world" which knows not God (1 John 3:1). The object of the Passion was the redemption and sanctification of the Church: "Christ also loved the church, and delivered Himself up for it: that he might sanctify it, cleansing it by the laver of water in the word of life" (Ephesians 5:25, 26). Again (2) the Church is the body of Christ. He is the head of the mystical body: and supernatural life -- the life of Christ Himself -- is communicated through the sacraments to all His members. Just as the Holy Ghost dwelt in the human body of Christ, so He now dwells in the Church: and His presence is so intimate and so efficacious that the Apostle can even speak of Him as the soul of the mystical body: "One body and one Spirit" (Ephesians 4:4). Thus it follows as a necessary consequence from the nature of the Church and her relation to Christ, that as a society she must possess means capable of producing holiness: that her members must be characterized by holiness: and that this endowment of sanctity will afford a ready means of distinguishing her from the world. It is further manifest that the Church's holiness must be of an entirely supernatural character -- something altogether beyond the power of unassisted human nature. And such is in fact the type of sanctity which Christ and His Apostles require on the part of members of the Church.


(1) The virtues which in the Christian ideal are the most fundamental of all, lie altogether outside the scope of the highest pagan ethics. Christian charity, humility, and chastity are instances in point. The charity which Christ sets forth in the Sermon on the Mount and in the parable of the Good Samaritan -- a charity which knows no limits and which embraces enemies as well as friends -- exceeds all that moralists had deemed possible for men. And this charity Christ requires not of a chosen few, but of all His followers. Humility, which in the Christian scheme is the necessary groundwork of all sanctity (Matthew 18:3), was previously to His teaching an unknown virtue. The sense of personal unworthiness in which it consists, is repugnant to all the impulses of unregenerate nature. Moreover, the humility which Christ demands, supposes as its foundation a clear knowledge of the guilt of sin, and of the mercy of God. Without these it cannot exist. And these doctrines are sought in vain in other religions than the Christian. In regard to chastity Christ not merely warned His followers that to violate this virtue even by a thought, was a grievous sin. He went yet further. He exhorted those of His followers to whom the grace should be given, to live the life of virginity that thereby they might draw nearer to God (Matthew 19:12).


(2) Another characteristic of holiness according to the Christian ideal is love of suffering; not as though pleasure were evil in itself, but because suffering is the great means by which our love of God is intensified and purified. All those who have attained a high degree of holiness have learnt to rejoice in suffering, because by it their love to God was freed from every element of self-seeking, and their lives conformed to that of their Master. Those who have not grasped this principle may call themselves by the name of Christian, but they have not understood the meaning of the Cross.


(3) It has ever been held that holiness when it reaches a sublime degree is accompanied by miraculous powers. And Christ promised that this sign should not be lacking to His Church. The miracles, which His followers should work, would, He declared, be no whit less stupendous than those wrought by Himself during His mortal life (Mark 16:17, 18; John 14:12). The gift of miracles is, in Christian theology, among the charismata or gifts mentioned by St. ...


Such in brief outline is the sanctity with which Christ endowed His Church, and which is to be the distinguishing mark of her children. It is, however, to be noted that He said nothing to suggest that all His followers would make use of the opportunities thus afforded them. On the contrary, He expressly taught that His flock would contain many unworthy members (Matthew 13:30, 48). And we may be sure that as within the Church the lights are brightest, so there too the shadows will be darkest -- corruptio optimi pessima. An unworthy Catholic will fall lower than an unworthy pagan. To show that the Church possesses the note of holiness it suffices to establish that her teaching is holy: that she is endowed with the means of producing supernatural holiness in her children: that, notwithstanding the unfaithfulness of many members, a vast number do in fact cultivate a sanctity beyond anything that can be found elsewhere: and that in certain cases this sanctity attains so high a degree that God honours it with miraculous powers.


It is not difficult to show that the Catholic and Roman Church, and she alone, fulfils these conditions. In regard to her doctrines, it is manifest that the moral law which she proposes as of Divine obligation, is more lofty and more exacting than that which any of the sects has ventured to require. Her vindication of the indissolubility of marriage in the face of a licentious world affords the most conspicuous instance of this. She alone maintains in its integrity her Master's teaching on marriage. Every other religious body without exception has given place to the demands of human passion. In regard to the means of holiness, she, through her seven sacraments, applies to her members the fruits of the Atonement. She pardons the guilt of sin, and nourishes the faithful on the Body and Blood of Christ. Nor is the justice of her claims less manifest when we consider the result of her work. In the Catholic Church is found a marvellous succession of saints whose lives are as beacon-lights in the history of mankind. In sanctity the supremacy of Bernard, of Dominic, of Francis, of Ignatius, of Theresa, is as unquestioned as is that of Alexander and of Cæsar in the art of war. Outside the Catholic Church the world has nothing to show which can in any degree compare with them. Within the Church the succession never fails.


Nor do the saints stand alone. In proportion to the practical influence of Catholic teaching, the supernatural virtues of which we have spoken above, are found also among the rest of the faithful. These virtues mark a special type of character which the Church seeks to realize in her children, and which finds little favour among other claimants to the Christian name. Outside the Catholic Church the life of virginity is condemned; love of suffering is viewed as a medieval superstition; and humility is regarded as a passive virtue ill-suited to an active and pushing age. Of course it is not meant that we do not find many individual instances of holiness outside the Church. God's grace is universal in its range. But it seems beyond question that the supernatural sanctity whose main features we have indicated, is recognized by all as belonging specifically to the Church, while in her alone does it reach that sublime degree which we see in the saints. In the Church too we see fulfilled Christ's promise that the gift of miracles shall not be wanting to His followers. Miracles, it is true, are not sanctity. But they are the aura in which the highest sanctity moves. And from the time of the Apostles to the nineteenth century the lives of the saints show us that the laws of nature have been suspended at their prayers. In numberless cases the evidence for these events is so ample that nothing but the exigencies of controversy can explain the refusal of anti-Catholic writers to admit their occurrence.


The proof appears to be complete. There can be as little doubt which Church displays the note of sanctity, as there is in regard to the notes of unity, catholicity and apostolicity. The Church in communion with the See of Rome and it alone possesses that holiness which the words of Christ and His Apostles demand".


In the Roman Catholic branch of Christianity, one who is sanctified is believed to be free from sin. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral code of conduct or the state of having committed such a violation. ...


Protestantism

A true overview as to what protestants believe concerning sanctification would be lengthy, due to the fact that Protestant theologies differ from denomination to denomination.


In the Protestant churches sanctification is widely viewed as the second stage in the Christian's walk with Christ, the first being justification (used here as salvation) and the third being glorification. In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of making or declaring a sinner righteous before God. ... In religion, salvation refers to being saved from an undesirable state or condition. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Sanctification, as discussed above, begins at the moment the Christian is saved, but the point of completion is sometimes disputed.


Lutheranism

Martin Luther taught that sanctification happens only through the grace given by Christ. Contrary to Catholic and modern Protestant teachings, Luther did not view santification as being completely divorced from justification. Christians are not justified and then given the work of sanctification, rather he viewed that both are the unmerited work of Christ in the believer. Good works are not evidence of justification. If they were, it would cease to be salvation by faith alone. Luther mostly agreed with John Calvin's description of sanctification but disagreed with its practice, specifically in regard to the third use of the law. He did not view the law as didactically beneficially to the believer. The law is slavery to the believer, not the means by which one is actually changed. For Luther, real change happened in the believer's life when Jesus declares remission of sin and love despite all evidence to the contrary. The believer may be moved to good works out of such love. There is also no progressive nature to sanctification for Luther because doing so would only reinforce an expectation of change as evidence of justification. Until death, the Christian is at the same time loved and a sinner. As Luther would commonly say "Simul iustus Et Peccator!" Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Justification can mean: justification (jurisprudence) justification (typesetting) justification (theology) In epistemology, justification of a belief is what renders it worth believing in terms of its probable truth. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... i hate god ...


Methodism

John Wesley, founder of Methodism, combined Protestant, Eastern Orthodox, and Roman Catholic teaching as he taught what is variously known as entire sanctification (in churches of the Holiness movement such as the Church of the Nazarene, the Salvation Army, etc.) or Christian Perfection (in "mainstream" Methodist denominations such as the United Methodist Church, the Methodist Church of Great Britain, etc.). Wesley taught that by the power of God's sanctifying grace and attention upon the means of grace, a Christian may be cleansed of the corrupting influence of original sin in this life, though this was not something that every Christian experienced. For Wesley and for Methodists in general, sanctification is a life-long process of healing humankind's sin-distorted perspective and way of life, but for Holiness Wesleyans, entire sanctification comes in an instantaneous transformative moment (glorification). John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... The Church of the Nazarene is a Protestant denomination within the tradition of evangelical Methodism. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a Protestant evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by Methodist ministers William Booth and Catherine Booth. ... Christian Perfection is a Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion but before death a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a large, long-established subgroup within a religion that has existed for many years. ... This article is about the current denomination in the United States. ... The Methodist Church of Great Britain or British Methodist Church is the largest Wesleyan / Methodist body in the United Kingdom, with congregations across Great Britain and the Isle of Man. ... The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives His grace. ... Michelangelos painting of the sin of Adam and Eve (the Fall) According to Christian tradition, original sin is the general condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are born (Psalm 51:5[1]). Original sin is also called hereditary sin, birth sin, or person sin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


See also

The word charisma (from the Greek word χάρισμα (kharisma), gift or divine favor, from kharizesthai, to favor, from kharis, favor) refers to a rare trait found in certain human personalities usually including extreme charm and a magnetic quality of personality and/or appearance along with innate and powerfully sophisticated personal communicability... Christian Perfection is a Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion but before death a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favor of God for humankind, as manifest in the blessings bestowed upon all —irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ... Imputed righteousness, in Methodist theology, is that gracious gift of God given at the moment of the new birth which enables a Christian disciple to strive for holiness and sanctification. ... The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives His grace. ... Righteousness is an important concept in the theology of Judaism and Christianity. ... The Social Gospel movement is a Protestant movement that was most prominent in the late 19th and early to mid-20th century. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis, meaning divinization (or deification or, to become god), is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ... In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of making or declaring a sinner righteous before God. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ...

References

Further reading

  • Alexander, Donald L., ed. Christian Spirituality: Five Views of Sanctification. (ISBN 0-8308-1278-4)
  • Gundry, Stanley, ed. Five Views on Sanctification. (ISBN 0-310-21269-3)

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sanctification (2785 words)
Sanctification involves more than a mere moral reformation of character, brought about by the power of the truth: it is the work of the Holy Spirit bringing the whole nature more and more under the influences of the new gracious principles implanted in the soul in regeneration.
In the apostolic church, the essence of sanctification was a Christlike purity; in the patristic church, withdrawal from the contaminations of society.
Sanctification is the sustaining and developing work of the Holy Spirit, bringing all the faculties of the soul more and more perfectly under the purifying and regulating principle of spiritual life.
SANCTIFICATION Pt. 1 -- by Charles G. Finney (8764 words)
Entire sanctification does not imply any change in the substance of the soul or body, for this the law does not require, and it would not be obligatory if it did, because the requirement would be inconsistent with natural justice.
And if entire sanctification is to be understood as implying that we love God as much as we should, had we all the knowledge we might have had, then I repeat it, there is not a saint on earth or in heaven, nor ever will be, that is entirely sanctified.
If entire sanctification therefore, implies the same degree of love or service that might have been rendered, had we always developed our powers by a perfect use of them, then there is not a saint on earth or in heaven that is or ever will be in that state.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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