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Encyclopedia > San Pedro, Los Angeles, California
San Pedro is connected to Los Angeles by a thin strip of land called the "Harbor Gateway" which roughly follows the 110 freeway.

San Pedro is a beach community within Los Angeles, California, USA. It was annexed in 1909 and is a major seaport of the area. The town has grown from being dominated by the fishing industry to become primarily a blue-collar working town. The name of the town is pronounced by its residents, even its Hispanic residents, as [ˌsæn ˈpidroʊ] (in IPA) rather than its Spanish pronunciation (IPA: [samˈpeðɾo]). Download high resolution version (1008x668, 23 KB)Map of the City of Los Angeles within Los Angeles County, with County highlighted in California. ... Download high resolution version (1008x668, 23 KB)Map of the City of Los Angeles within Los Angeles County, with County highlighted in California. ... The Harbor Gateway is a two-mile wide north-south corridor between Western and Normandie Avenues. ... The Harbor Freeway is often heavily congested at rush hour The Harbor Freeway is one of the principal north-south freeways in Los Angeles County, California. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Annexation is the legal merging of some territory into another body. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ...

Contents

Geography

San Pedro is located at 33°44′9″N, 118°17′32″W (33.73583, -118.29139).GR1


Climate

The city is situated in a Mediterranean climate zone (Köppen climate classification), experiencing mild, somewhat wet winters and warm to hot summers. Breezes from the Pacific Ocean tend to keep the beach community cooler in summer and warmer in winter than those in further inland Los Angeles; summer temperatures can sometimes be as much as 18 °F (10 °C) warmer in the inland communities compared to that of San Pedro and other Los Angeles coastal communities. The area also sees a phenomenon known as the "marine layer," a dense cloud cover caused by the proximity of the ocean that helps keep the temperatures cooler throughout the year. When the marine layer becomes more common and pervades farther inland during the months of May and June, it is called June Gloom.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ... Winters is a city located in Yolo County, California. ... Summer is one of the four temperate seasons. ... June Gloom (also May Gray) is a local term for a Southern California weather pattern that results in overcast skies with low to moderate temperatures during the early summer (sometimes referred to as May Gray when it occurs in late spring). ...


History

San Pedro in an 1850 daguerreotype, Deadman's Island is at the top
San Pedro in an 1850 daguerreotype, Deadman's Island is at the top
San Pedro in an 1893 lithograph
San Pedro in an 1893 lithograph

The site, at the southern end of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, on the west side of San Pedro Bay, was used by Spanish ships starting in the 1540s. Image File history File links SanPedro-1850daguerreotype. ... Image File history File links SanPedro-1850daguerreotype. ... An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ... Deadmans Island at the top of a 1873 photo of San Pedro Deadmans Island (alternately written as Dead Mans Island) was one of two islands near San Pedro, Los Angeles, California in the 19th century. ... Image File history File links SanPedro-1893. ... Image File history File links SanPedro-1893. ... Lithography is a method for printing on a smooth surface, as well as a method of manufacturing semiconductor and MEMS devices. ... Palos Verdes is often used to refer to a group of coastal cities on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in the Los Angeles/South Bay area of California. ... San Pedro Bay is an inlet on the Pacific Ocean coast of southern California, United States. ... 1541 Hernando de Soto is the first European to see the Mississippi River. ...


Origin of name

San Pedro was named after St. Peter of Alexandria, a 4th century bishop in Alexandria, Egypt. His feast day is November 24, the day on which Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo discovered the bay in 1542 which would become "San Pedro." Santa Catalina Island, named after St. Katherine of Sinai, was also claimed for the Spanish Empire the next day, on her feast day, November 25th. In 1602-1603, Sebastián Vizcaíno (1548-1624) officially surveyed and mapped the California coastline, including San Pedro Bay, for New Spain. is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, in Portuguese João Rodrigues Cabrilho, (ca 1499–January 3, 1543) was an explorer noted for his exploration of the west coast of North America while sailing for Spain. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Santa Catalina Island, location relative to the coast of Southern California Santa Catalina Island, often called Catalina Island, or just Catalina, is a rocky island off the coast of the U.S. state of California. ... An anachronous map of the Spanish Empire (1492-1898). ... Sebastián Vizcaíno (1548-1624) was a Spanish soldier, entrepreneur, explorer, and diplomat whose varied roles took him to New Spain, the Philippines, the Baja California peninsula, Alta California, and Japan. ... Events Mary I of Scotland sent to France Births September 2 - Vincenzo Scamozzi, Italian architect (died 1616) September 29 - William V, Duke of Bavaria (died 1626) Francesco Andreini, Italian actor (died 1624) Giordano Bruno, Italian philosopher, astronomer, and occultist (burned at the stake) 1600 (died 1600) Honda Tadakatsu, Japanese general... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... map of New Spain in red, with territories claimed but not controlled in orange. ...


Settlement

Regular settlement began in 1769 as part of the effort to populate California, although trade restrictions encouraged more smuggling than regular business. The Rancho San Pedro is the site of the first Spanish land grant in Alta California, New Spain. The land was granted in 1784 by King Carlos III to Juan Jose Dominguez, a retired Spanish soldier who came to California with the Gaspar de Portolà expedition. 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Juan Jose Dominguez, a Spanish soldier, came to San Diego, California with the Gaspar de Portolà expedition, and later to San Juan Capistrano and San Gabriel, with Father Juniperro Serra. ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or especially academic institutions. ... Alta California (Upper California) was formed in 1804 when the province of California, then a part of the Spanish colony of New Spain, was divided in two along the line separating the Franciscan missions in the north from the Dominican missions in the south. ... map of New Spain in red, with territories claimed but not controlled in orange. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles III (January 20, 1716 – December 14, 1788) was king of Spain 1759–1788 (as Carlos III de Borbon), King of the Two Sicilies 1735–1759 (as Carlo VII), and Duke of Parma 1732–1735 (as Carlo I). ... Gaspar de Portolà i Rovira (1716 – 1784), a soldier, governor of Baja and Alta California (1767–1770), explorer and founder of San Diego and Monterey. ...


When New Spain won its independence from the Spanish Empire and Alta California became part of Mexico, the trade restrictions were lifted, and the town flourished. Under United States control after 1848, when the United States defeated Mexico in the Mexican-American war, the harbor was greatly improved and expanded under the guidance of Phineas Banning. San Pedro became a major port of the West Coast and is now the busiest port in the country. map of New Spain in red, with territories claimed but not controlled in orange. ... An anachronous map of the Spanish Empire (1492-1898). ... Alta California (Upper California) was formed in 1804 when the province of California, then a part of the Spanish colony of New Spain, was divided in two along the line separating the Franciscan missions in the north from the Dominican missions in the south. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Phineas Banning (1830-1885) was an American businessman, stagecoach driver, entrepreneur, and general best known to history as the Father of the Port of Los Angeles. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


In 1888, the War Department took control of a tract of land next to the bay and added to it in 1897 and 1910. This became Fort MacArthur in 1914 and was a coastal defense site for many years. Many other facilities were established in the San Pedro area, and it was a popular port of call for U.S. Navy ships, especially during World War II. The town became a well known watering hole for sailors and Marines during leave and established a reputation as a rough-and-tumble town that, to a certain extent, it still maintains today. For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Fort MacArthur is a former U.S. Army installation in San Pedro, California (now the port community of Los Angeles), named for General Arthur MacArthur, Jr. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Typically, a port of call is a city or town in a country being visited by sea; if it is the first a vessel visits in that country, the vessel and all passengers and crew must clear in with local authorities there. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ...


Los Angeles Annexation

In 1906, the City of Los Angeles annexed a long narrow strip of land connecting the city to the coast, and in 1909, the city annexed San Pedro and the adjacent town of Wilmington. The odd shape is still seen in the map of the city. 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sketch of Wilmington in 1900, looking north Wilmington, California is a neighborhood of Los Angeles, with industry as its primary economical activity. ...


Port of Los Angeles

Vincent Thomas Bridge
Vincent Thomas Bridge
The Angel's Gate Lighthouse has stood at the entrance to the port since 1913.
The Angel's Gate Lighthouse has stood at the entrance to the port since 1913.
Satellite Image- San Pedro.
Main article: Port of Los Angeles

San Pedro, Wilmington, and Terminal Island are the locations of the Port of Los Angeles. Vincent Thomas Bridge Source: http://www. ... Vincent Thomas Bridge Source: http://www. ... Old postcard view San Pedro Lighthouse, San Pedro Bay, Los Angeles Harbor, California, circa 1910 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Old postcard view San Pedro Lighthouse, San Pedro Bay, Los Angeles Harbor, California, circa 1910 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x688, 930 KB) NASA World Find File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x688, 930 KB) NASA World Find File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... General Information Founded December 9, 1907 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 33º4239 N 118º1459 W Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 7500 acres 4200 acres 3300 acres Available Berths 270 Vessel Arrivals 2,813 (FY 2004) Annual container volume 7. ...


Locations of interest

One San Pedro landmark is the Vincent Thomas Bridge, a 1,500-foot- long suspension bridge linking San Pedro with Terminal Island and named after California Assemblyman Vincent Thomas. It is the third longest suspension bridge in California. Nearby is the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, the largest maritime museum in California, as is the museum ship SS Lane Victory, a fully operational victory ship of World War II and National Historic Landmark. The Vincent Thomas Bridge is a 1,500-foot long suspension bridge crossing the Los Angeles Harbor linking San Pedro, California with Terminal Island. ... A suspension bridge is a type of bridge that has been created since ancient times as early as 100 AD. Simple suspension bridges, for use by pedestrians and livestock, are still constructed, based upon the ancient Inca rope bridge. ... Reservation Point at the very southwest tip of Teminal Island. ... The California State Assembly chamber California State Assembly Chamber in the State Capitol The California State Assembly is the lower house of the California State Legislature. ... The Los Angeles Maritime Museum is located on the main channel in Los Angeles Harbor, San Pedro, California. ... A maritime museum (sometimes nautical museum) is a museum specializing in the display of objects relating to ships and travel on seas and lakes. ... USS Wisconsin, one of three Iowa class battleships opened to the public as a museum, and was one of two Iowas maintained in the US Mothball fleet. ... SS Lane Victory is a Second World War Victory ship which is preserved as a museum ship in the San Pedro area of Los Angeles, California. ... The Victory ship was a type of cargo ship produced in large numbers by North American shipyards during World War II to replace losses caused by German submarines. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


The Frank Gehry-designed Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is also in San Pedro. The Point Fermin Lighthouse, a Victorian-era structure built in the late 19th century, still exists as a museum and park on a bluff overlooking the ocean. The Korean Bell of Friendship is a massive bronze memorial bell donated by South Korea in 1976 to the people of Los Angeles. Frank Owen Gehry (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is an aquarium in San Pedro, California, a community within Los Angeles. ... Point Fermin is a lighthouse on Point Fermin in San Pedro, California The original fourth order Fresnel lens was removed in 1942 and a wood replica lantern was installed in 1974. ... The Korean Bell of Friendship The Korean Bell of Friendship is a massive bronze bell housed in a stone pavilion in Angels Gate Park, in the San Pedro district of Los Angeles, California. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Korean Bell of Friendship.

In 2003, the San Pedro Waterfront Red Car Line was opened, along the waterfront between downtown San Pedro and the Cruise Ship Terminal. This line includes two newly constructed trolleys built to resemble the wood-bodied 500 class cars introduced in 1905 for the Pacific Electric Railway, which once operated more than 1,000 miles of track running streetcars and interurbans in Southern California. The 1.5-mile line operates along former Pacific Electric right-of-way. The line, rebuilt and maintained by the Port of Los Angeles, also has one original restored Pacific Electric interurban, which is used only for special charter excursions and special events. The original car is in fact Pacific Electric 963 (former Los Angeles Pacific 713 as built in 1907) rebuilt by Richard Fellows and renumbered 1058. Discussions have been held to extend the line to the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium. Port of LA Waterfront Red Car Line ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 237 KB) The Korean Bell of Friendship in Los Angeles, California. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 237 KB) The Korean Bell of Friendship in Los Angeles, California. ... Pacific Electric Railway company depot in downtown Los Angeles, circa 1910. ... General Information Founded December 9, 1907 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 33º4239 N 118º1459 W Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 7500 acres 4200 acres 3300 acres Available Berths 270 Vessel Arrivals 2,813 (FY 2004) Annual container volume 7. ... Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is an aquarium in San Pedro, California, a community within Los Angeles. ...


Twenty-Eighth Street in San Pedro, between Gaffey Street and Peck Avenue, is the steepest section of public roadway in Los Angeles. For about 50 feet, the street climbs at a 33.3% angle, although the rest of the street is less steep. [1]


Special events

  • Annual Los Angeles Harbor Holiday Afloat Parade: the 2006 parade was the 43rd edition.
  • Annual Holiday Spirit of San Pedro Parade: the 2006 parade was the 27th
  • Annual Taste of San Pedro, held at Point Fermin Park. The event features local restaurants and musicians.
  • Annual Chocolate Lobster Dive-a-Thon, held at Cabrillo Beach where participants SCUBA dive for "chocolate lobsters" for prizes.
  • First Thursday Artwalk & Dining, held in Downtown San Pedro on Sixth and Seventh Streets between Pacific Avenue and Mesa.
  • Annual Festival of Philippine Arts & Culture, held at Point Fermin Park. Now in its 16th year, FPAC is the largest presenter of Philippine arts and culture in Southern California presenting over 1200 artists in 9 disciplines and attracting over 20,000 audience members from all over the country. The event will be September 8 & 9.

Demographic history

Ethnically diverse, San Pedro was a magnet for European immigrants from various countries for years, reflected in the number of restaurants representing diverse cuisines, especially Portuguese, Mexican, Croatian, Italian, and Greek. San Pedro is home to the largest Italian-American community in Southern California, centered on the "Via Italia" (South Cabrillo Avenue). Estimates state that the community numbers about 45,000 Italian-Americans. San Pedro is also considered a heart of the Croatian community in Los Angeles. This community, originally comprised of seafarers and fishermen from the Dalmatia (especially the islands of Brač, Hvar, Vis and Korčula) region, has been present in San Pedro since the settlement began more than 200 years ago. The City of Los Angeles even named a stretch of 9th Street "Croatian Place" in honor of the city's old Croatian community. There are reportedly more than 35,000 Croats in San Pedro, making it the biggest Croatian community on the Pacific.[2]. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... An Italian American is an American of Italian descent. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Location of Brač Brač (pronounced as Bra-tch; Latin Bratzis, Italian Brazza) is an island in the Adriatic Sea within Croatia, with an area of 396 km², making it the third largest island in the Adriatic, and thus the largest in Dalmatia. ... Hvar (Croatia) For the acronym, see HVAR. Hvar (Lesina in Italian) is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, located off the Dalmatian coast. ... Vis can refer to: Vis, a type of Polish handgun, after the Polish word for power in Latin Vis, an island in the Adriatic Vis, town and municipality on the aforementioned island See also: VIS This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 279 km² (entire island) Location Mayor Mirko Duhović (SDP) Population 3,232 (town); 16,138 (island) Korčula (Italian Curzola, Latin Corcyra Nigra, Greek Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic: Krkar) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia. ...


A large portion of San Pedro is also composed of Mexican-Americans with long-time roots in the community, Mexican and other Hispanic immigrants, and African-Americans. Much of their populations are based in the older, east side of the community surrounding the downtown area and bordering the Port of Los Angeles. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Until February 1942, San Pedro was home to a vibrant Japanese immigrant community of about 3,000 people who lived in what had been described as a" typical Japanese Fishing Village" on Terminal Island (East San Pedro). Reservation Point at the very southwest tip of Teminal Island. ...


These Japanese immigrants pioneered albacore fishing out of San Pedro Bay and harvesting abalone off of White Point,thus leading the way in establishing a viable fishing industry in San Pedro.


The 48-hour forced expulsion of these San Pedro residents and the razing of their homes and shops, as part of the Japanese-American internment during World War II, is described in Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston's memoir Farewell to Manzanar. Jerome Relocation Camp The Japanese American internment refers to the exclusion and subsequent removal of approximately 112,000 to 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, officially described as persons of Japanese ancestry, 62% of whom were United States citizens, from the west coast of the United States during World War... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston is a Japanese American writer. ... Cover of the 1983 edition Farewell to Manzanar is a memoir published in 1972 by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston. ...


Ethnicity & race

(Population 72,146) The racial make up of San Pedro according to the 2000 U.S. Census data is 63.02% Caucasian (Croatian, Italian, Hispanic-Whites, Middle Eastern) 6.45% Black, 1.02% American Indian and Alaska Native alone, 4.78% Asian, 0.40% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, 18.02% some other race, and 6.30% two or more races. Separate from those statistics, 41.14% of "Caucasians" identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino, and 43.41% as "Caucasian" alone, not Hispanic or Latino. [3] The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Education

San Pedro is served by the Los Angeles Unified School District. San Pedro High School and the Port of Los Angeles High School are primary senior high schools within the region. San Pedro High School is home to the protected landmarks in the form of The English Language Arts and Administration Buildings (c. 1939, 1936, resp.). The school recently celebrated its 100 year anniversary in 2003. It is home to both the Marine Science and Police Academy Magnet programs. Port of Los Angeles High School is a public charter high school, fusing a college preparatory program with elective coursework in International Business and Maritime Studies. Such studies reinforce the significant impact of California’s ports on the global economy and international trade.


Test scores tend to be higher in the area's elementary schools than in its middle and high schools [4].

Primary Schools (Grades 1-5)
  • 15th Street Elementary [5] [6]
  • Bandini Elementary [7]
  • Barton Hill Elementary [8] [9]
  • Cabrillo Early Education Center [10]
  • Cabrillo Elementary [11]
  • Leland Elementary [12]
  • Park Western Harbor Magnet [13]
  • Point Fermin Elementary [14]
  • San Pedro/Wilmington Early Education Center [15]
  • South Shores Magnet for the Visual and Performing Arts Elementary School
  • Taper Elementary [16] [17]
  • Taper Avenue Elementary Technology Magnet Center [18]
  • White Point Elementary [19]
Secondary Schools (Grades 6-12)
  • Dana Middle School [20] [21]
  • San Pedro High School [22] [23]
    • San Pedro High School Marine Science Magnet [24]
    • San Pedro High School Police Academy [25]

Port of Los Angeles High School San Pedro High School is a public high school in the Los Angeles Unified School District located in San Pedro, California. ...

Private Schools (Grades 9-12)
  • Mary Star of the Sea High School [26]
Continuation Schools
  • Angel's Gate Continuation High [27]
  • Cooper Community Day School [28]
  • Harbor Community Adult School [29]
  • Harbor Occupational Center [30]

Mary Star of the Sea High School is the only private, Roman Catholic high school in the San Pedro neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. ...

Libraries

Los Angeles Public Library operates the San Pedro Branch. The Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) system serves the residents of Los Angeles, California. ...


In the media

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Film

This article is about the short story by Richard Connell. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Edward Connell, Jr. ... This is about the original movie and novel. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The term Modern Times is used by historians to loosely describe the period of time immediately following what is known as the Early Modern Times. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nothing Sacred refers to: a 1937 film Nothing Sacred (film) starring Carole Lombard and Frederic March. ... The Long Voyage Home is a 1940 film which tells the story of the crew and passengers aboard a doomed freighter. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel, one of the most celebrated serials for both Republic Pictures and of the sound era in general. ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... Giacobbe La Motta (born July 10, 1921), better known as Jake LaMotta, nicknamed The Bronx Bull and The Raging Bull, is a former boxer who was world middleweight champion and whose life has been as controversial outside the ring as it was inside it. ... Escape from the Planet of the Apes is a 1971 science fiction film that is the second sequel to the Planet of the Apes movie of 1968, the first sequel being Beneath the Planet of the Apes. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998) was a British actor. ... Kim Hunter (November 12, 1922 – September 11, 2002) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the book. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Roman PolaÅ„ski (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award winning film director, writer, actor, producer. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... Private Benjamin is a 1980 comedy film which tells the story of Judy, a wealthy Jewish woman, who joins the army when her new husband dies on their wedding night. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The Academy Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... This page has been protected from editing to deal with vandalism. ... Eileen Brennan (born September 3, 1938 in Los Angeles, California) is an American character actress of films, television, and theatre. ... The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Swing shift, also known as second shift, is an employment schedule during the evening, for example 4 p. ... This article is about the year. ... Jonathan Demme (born February 22, 1944, in Baldwin, New York) is an American film director, producer and writer. ... Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Christine Lahti (born April 4, 1950) is an American actress. ... To Live and Die in L.A. is a neo-noir American film released in 1985 and directed by William Friedkin. ... Neo-noir (a portmanteau of the Greek neo, new; and the French noir, black) is a type of motion picture that prominently utilizes elements of film noir, but with updated themes, content, style or visual elements that were absent in films noir of the 1940s and 50s. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... Because of both the secrecy of secret services and the controversial nature of the issues involved, there is some difficulty in separating the definitions of secret service, secret police, intelligence agency etc. ... William Petersen, an American actor, was born on February 21, 1953, in Evanston, Illinois. ... William Dafoe, Jr. ... John Michael Turturro (born February 28, 1957) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor noted for his performances in To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), The Color of Money (1986), Five Corners (1987), Men of Respect (1991), Monday Night Mayhem (1999), Secret Window (2004), The Bronx is Burning... John Pankow, an American film and stage actor. ... Gary Sherman, born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, started directing short films, commercials, industrials, and documentaries while still an undergraduate at IITs Institute of Design. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxÉ›r ulsÉ›n hÊŒuÉ›r]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an Academy Award-nominated American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool.[1] He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... The 1987 film Some Kind of Wonderful stars Eric Stoltz, Lea Thompson, and Mary Stuart Masterson. ... Eric Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Lea Thompson in Back to the Future. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For other people with this name, see John Hughes. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Grand Funk Railroad is an American rock band. ... A Nightmare on Elm Street is an American horror film directed by Wes Craven about several teenagers being terrorized in their nightmares by a mysterious man named Freddy Krueger in the fictional Midwest town of Springwood, Ohio. ... Renny Harlin (born Lauri Mauritz Harjola on March 15, 1959 in Riihimäki, Finland) is a film director and producer mostly known for action movies. ... The Naked Gun is the name of a series of comedy movies starring Leslie Nielsen, Priscilla Presley and OJ Simpson. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Leslie William Nielsen OC (born February 11, 1926) is a Canadian-American comedian and actor. ... Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (born Priscilla Ann Wagner on May 24, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American model, author and actress and ex-wife of rock n roll singer and musician Elvis Presley and mother of singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley. ... George Harris Kennedy, Jr. ... Orenthal James Simpson (born July 9, 1947), commonly known as O. J. Simpson and also just by his initials O.J. and his nickname The Juice, is a retired American football player who achieved stardom at the collegiate and professional levels. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award and four-time Golden Globe winning American film actor and director. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Glenn Plummer (born August 18, 1961 in Richmond, California, USA) is an African-American film and television actor. ... Grand L. Bush (born December 24, 1955) is an American actor of stage, television and major motion pictures. ... Don Cheadle (born November 29, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... Damon Kyle Wayans (born September 4, 1960; correctly pronounced WAYNES) is an American stand-up comedian, writer, and actor who began his career as a stand-up comic in 1982. ... Leon Preston Robinson IV (born March 8, 1962) is an American actor and singer. ... Maria Conchita Alonso María Conchita Alonso (born June 29, 1957) is a Cuban-born Venezuelan singer and actress. ... The Abyss is a 1989 science fiction film which was written and directed by James Cameron, starring Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and Michael Biehn. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... James Francis Cameron (born August 16, 1954) is a three-time Academy Award winning director, producer and screenwriter. ... Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, known for his performances in The Rock, The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Pollock, and The Truman Show, among many others. ... Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio (born November 17, 1958 in Lombard, Illinois) is an American actress and singer of Italian descent. ... Michael Connell Biehn (born July 31, 1956) is an American actor known for his roles in The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989), Tombstone (1993), The Rock (1996), and Grindhouse (2007). ... OSCAR is an acronym for Orbital Satellite Carrying Amateur Radio. ... The Academy Award for Visual Effects is an Oscar given to one film each year that shows highest achievement in visual effects. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... This is a list of films that have received an Oscar for best sound. ... Michael Connell Biehn (born July 31, 1956) is an American actor known for his roles in The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989), Tombstone (1993), The Rock (1996), and Grindhouse (2007). ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is not a labor union or guild, but rather an educational, cultural and professional organization. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A Few Good Men, a play by Aaron Sorkin, was acclaimed on Broadway and was subsequently made into a successful film in 1992. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Demi Moore (born November 11, 1962) is an American actress. ... Nicholson as Wilbur Force in The Little Shop of Horrors (1960). ... Kevin Pollak Kevin E. Pollak (born on October 30, 1957 in San Francisco, California) is an American actor and comedian, best known for his uncanny impressions of Christopher Walken and William Shatner. ... Kevin Norwood Bacon[1] (born July 8, 1958) is an American film and theater actor who has starred in Footloose, Animal House, Stir of Echoes, Wild Things, JFK, and Apollo 13, among many others. ... J.T. Walsh (September 28, 1943–February 27, 1998) was an American actor best known for his roles as quietly sinister white-collar sleazeballs (quote from Leonard Maltin) in numerous feature films. ... Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland (born December 21, 1966) is an Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian television and film actor, well known for his role of Jack Bauer on the series 24. ... Clear and present danger is a term used by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Phillip Noyce on the set of Rabbit-Proof Fence with the films star, Everlyn Sampi. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... L.A. Takedown is a crime/thriller made for TV movie that aired on NBC on August 27, 1989 at 9 pm. ... Michael Mann is the name of: Michael Mann (film director) (born 1943) Michael Mann (scientist), climate researcher. ... Virus outbreaks occur when a virus bypasses infection control measures and a relatively high number of infections are observed where no cases or sporadic cases occurred in the past. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Rene Russo Rene Russo (born February 17, 1954 in Burbank, California, USA) is an American film actress and model. ... Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... Wolfgang Petersen Wolfgang Petersen (born March 14, 1941 in Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany) is a German film director. ... Cuba Gooding Jr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Patrick Galen Dempsey (born January 13, 1966) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor who first became prominent in Hollywood during the late 1980s. ... A Walk in the Clouds is a 1996 romance film directed by Alfonso Arau and produced by the Zucker brothers. ... While most films have some aspect of romance between characters (at least as a subplot,) a romance film can be loosely defined as any film in which the central plot (the premise of the story) revolves around the romantic involvement of the storys protagonists. ... Alfonso Arau (born January 11, 1932) is a Mexican director of such films as Zapata: The Dream of a Hero, Like Water for Chocolate (Mexico, 1992) (adapted from the novel written by his wife, Laura Esquivel), and A Walk in the Clouds, which starred Keanu Reeves and Anthony Quinn. ... David and Jerry Zucker together with Jim Abrahams made several comedies including Airplane!, Top Secret!, The Naked Gun, The Naked Gun 2½, The Naked Gun 33⅓ and the TV series Police Squad! Categories: Stub ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Keanu Charles Reeves (pronounced in IPA: ) is a Canadian actor, born September 2, 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon, and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Giancarlo Giannini (born August 1, 1942, La Spezia, Liguria, Italy) is an Oscar-nominated Italian actor and dubber. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Aitana Sánchez-Gijón (born November 5, 1968 in Rome, Italy) is a Spanish-Italian film actress. ... The Usual Suspects is a 1995 American neo-noir film written by Christopher McQuarrie and directed by Bryan Singer. ... Christopher McQuarrie (born 1968) is an Academy Award winning American screenwriter and director. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Gabriel Byrne (born 12 May 1950) is an Irish actor. ... Chazz Palminteri (born May 15, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and writer, best known for his performances in The Usaul Suspects, A Bronx Tale and Mulholland Falls. ... Stephen Baldwin (born May 12, 1966 in Massapequa, New York) is an American actor, best known for his role in the 1995 ensemble cult film, The Usual Suspects. ... Peter William Postlethwaite OBE (born February 7, 1945)[1] is an English actor. ... Benicio Monserrat Rafael Del Toro Sanchez (born February 19, 1967, in San Germán, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award winning Puerto Rican actor. ... Kevin Pollak Kevin E. Pollak (born on October 30, 1957 in San Francisco, California) is an American actor and comedian, best known for his uncanny impressions of Christopher Walken and William Shatner. ... The Crossing Guard is a 1995 independent film directed and written by American actor Sean Penn. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... Nicholson as Wilbur Force in The Little Shop of Horrors (1960). ... David Morse (born October 11, 1953 in Beverly, Massachusetts) is an American stage, television, and cinema actor. ... Anjelica Huston (born July 8, 1951) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and former fashion model. ... Robin Gayle Wright Penn (born April 8, 1966) is an American film actress. ... Interstate 80 (Eastshore Freeway) in Berkeley, California: a typical American freeway (MUTCD definition) A freeway, also known as a highway, superhighway, autoroute, autobahn, autostrada, dual carriageway, expressway, Autosnelweg or motorway, depending on the country of discussion, is a type of road designed for safer high-speed operation of motor vehicles... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon (born March 22, 1976),[1] known simply as Reese Witherspoon, is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland (born December 21, 1966) is an Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian television and film actor, well known for his role of Jack Bauer on the series 24. ... Brooke Christa Camille Shields[1] (born May 31, 1965) is an American actress and supermodel. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Black comedy and List of black comedies, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A depiction by Gustave Doré. Little Red Riding Hood is a famous folktale about a young girls encounter with a wolf. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rock (1996) is an action movie that primarily takes place on Alcatraz Island, and the San Francisco Bay area. ... Face/Off is a 1997 film starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage and directed by John Woo. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer. ... Beverly Hills Ninja is a 1997 film staring Chris Farley as a bumbling Beverly Hills ninja hot on the tracks of the Criminal Element. ... Christopher Crosby Farley (February 15, 1964 – December 18, 1997) was an American actor and comedian. ... For other uses, see: Beverly Hills (disambiguation). ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... Dennis Dugan (born September 5, 1946 in Wheaton, Illinois) is an American actor and film director. ... Nicollette Sheridan (born Colette Sheridan on November 21, 1963) is a Golden Globe nominated British actress, primarily on soap operas, movies and television. ... Robin Shou (Chinese: , born July 17, 1960 in Hong Kong), has made a name for himself in the American movie industry. ... Nathaniel Parker (born 18 May 1962) is a British actor most widely known as Inspector Thomas Lynley, in the BBC television series based on the novels by Elizabeth George. ... Soon-Tek Oh (born 29 June 1943 in Japan) is a Korean-American actor. ... Christopher Julius Rock III[1] (born February 7, 1966)[2] is an American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... The film Batman and Robin, directed by Joel Schumacher, is considered by most to be less serious than the 1989 Batman movie and sequels Batman Returns (1992) and Forever (1995). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated American film director, writer and designer. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award and two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor, director, producer and screenwriter, known for his role in the first five seasons of the long-running television drama ER (1994–99), and his rise as an A-List movie star... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Christopher Chris Eugene ODonnell (born June 26, 1970) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor, perhaps best known for playing Robin in the Batman films, Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. ... Look up robin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Alicia Silverstone, (born October 4, 1976) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... In English The meaning of the name Alfred is: Sage; wise; elvin. ... Michael Gough (born November 23, 1914) is an English character actor who has appeared in over 100 films. ... Binomial name Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze Poison-ivy (Toxicodendron radicans or Rhus toxicodendron), in the family Anacardiaceae, is a woody vine that is well-known for its ability to produce urushiol, a skin irritant which for most people will cause an agonizing, itching rash. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an American film actress. ... Mr. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor, and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... For other uses of the word bane, see bane (disambiguation). ... Jeep Swenson Robert A. Swenson, more commonly known as Jeep Swenson (5 January 1957–18 August 1997), was an American pro-wrestler, stuntman and actor. ... La Amistad, a 19th century Spanish schooner The Amistad, a 1841 United States court case concerning a slave rebellion on that ship. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Illegal, or unlawful, is either prohibitted or not authorized by law. ... Matthew Baron McConaughey (born November 4, 1969) is an American actor. ... Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Stellan SkarsgÃ¥rd (help· info) (born June 13, 1951, Gothenburg, Sweden) is a Swedish actor. ... Djimon Gaston Hounsou (born April 24, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated Beninese actor, dancer and fashion model. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... A romantic drama film is a film that seriously studies the romantic nature of relationships between people. ... Look up titanic, Titanic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James Francis Cameron (born August 16, 1954) is a three-time Academy Award winning director, producer and screenwriter. ... The Lost World: Jurassic Park is a 1997 movie which is a sequel to the blockbuster Jurassic Park. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Jurassic Park media franchise is a series of books, films and video games centering on a disastrous attempt to create a theme park of cloned dinosaurs. ... Wild Things is a 1998 erotic crime film starring Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, Denise Richards, Neve Campbell and Bill Murray. ... Eroticism is an aesthetic focused on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ... A crime film, in its most general sense, is a film that deals with crime, criminal justice and the darker side of human nature. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Kevin Norwood Bacon[1] (born July 8, 1958) is an American film and theater actor who has starred in Footloose, Animal House, Stir of Echoes, Wild Things, JFK, and Apollo 13, among many others. ... Denise Lee Richards (born February 17, 1971) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Neve Adrianne Campbell (born October 3, 1973) is a Canadian actress. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-winning and Golden Globe-winning American comedian and actor. ... John McNaughton (born January 13, 1950) is an American film director, originally from Chicago, Illinois. ... The Thin Red Line is a phrase or title that refers to an outgunned military unit holding firm against attack: The Thin Red Line (1854 battle), the original reference to the resistance by 93rd (Highland) Regiment in the Crimean War The Thin Red Line, 1962 novel by James Jones about... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The war film is a film genre concerned with warfare, usually about naval, air or land battles, sometimes focusing instead on prisoners of war, covert operations, military training or other related subjects. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Operation Watchtower On August 7, 1942, the 1st Marine Division performed an amphibious landing east of the Tenaru River. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Fight Club[1] (1996) is the first published novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Charles Michael Chuck Palahniuk (IPA: )[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American satirical novelist and freelance journalist of Ukrainian ancestry born in Pasco, Washington. ... David Leo Fincher (born August 28, 1962) is an American music video and film director known for his dark and stylish portraits of the human experience, particularly Fight Club and Se7en. ... Edward Harrison Norton[1] (born August 18, 1969) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American film actor and director. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt(born December 18, 1963) is an American actor and film producer. ... Helena Bonham Carter (born May 26, 1966) is an Academy Award-nominated British actress, known for her roles in the films A Room with a View, Howards End, and Fight Club. ... This article is about the singer. ... Gone in Sixty Seconds, or Gone in 60 Seconds, is the name of two films, one a remake of the other: Gone in 60 Seconds (1974) Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Angelina Jolie (born June 4, 1975) is an American film actress, a former fashion model and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... Antonino Giovanni Ribisi (born December 17, 1974) is an American actor. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award and four-time Golden Globe winning American film actor and director. ... Dominic Sena is an American film director known most notably for his work on Swordfish and Gone in 60 Seconds. ... Scott Rosenberg is a film writer, producer and actor. ... Jerome Leon Bruckheimer (born September 21, 1945) is a film and television producer in the genre of action, drama, and science fiction. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Gone in Sixty Seconds, or Gone in 60 Seconds, is the name of two films, one a remake of the other: Gone in 60 Seconds (1974) Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... This article is about the television series. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... This article is about the television series. ... Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Drew Blyth Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an American actress and film producer, the youngest member of the Barrymore family of American actors. ... Lucy Alexis Liu (Chinese: 劉玉玲 Liú Yùlíng, born December 2, 1968 in Queens, New York) is an Emmy Award-nominated American actress. ... U-571 can refer to: Unterseeboot 571, a German submarine U-571, a movie This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jonathan Mostow (born November 28, 1961, Woodbridge, CT) is an American film director, writer and producer. ... Matthew Baron McConaughey (born November 4, 1969) is an American actor. ... William Paxton (born May 17, 1955) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Jon Bon Jovi (born John Francis Bongiovi Jr on March 2, 1962) is an American singer, musician, businessman, and actor. ... Jack Noseworthy (born December 21, 1964) is an American actor whose most visible movie role may have been in U-571. ... Will Estes (born William Estes Nipper, October 21, 1978, Los Angeles, California) is an American actor best known for his role as JJ Pryor, on the NBC drama American Dreams. ... Tom Guiry (Born October 12, 1981) is an American actor from Trenton, New Jersey, USA. His most notable appearances were in The Sandlot, Mystic River, The Mudge Boy, and The Four Diamonds. ... USS Virginia, a Virginia-class nuclear attack (SSN) submarine Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ... In the history of cryptography, the Enigma was a portable cipher machine used to encrypt and decrypt secret messages. ... One Night at McCools is a 2001 dark comedy, directed by Harald Zwart and starring Matt Dillon, Michael Douglas, Paul Reiser, John Goodman, and Liv Tyler. ... The term problem plays is applied to the three plays William Shakespeare wrote between the last of his pure comedies (Twelfth Night) and the first of his pure tragedies (Othello) They are Alls Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida. ... Harald Zwart (born July 1, 1965) is a Norwegian film director. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... Paul Reiser (March 30, 1957 – March 19, 2007) was an American actor, author and stand-up comedian, best known for his role in Mad About You. ... Not to be confused with Johnny Goodman (TV producer), Johnny Goodman, or John C. Goodman. ... Liv Tyler (born Liv Rundgren, on July 1, 1977 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, New York[1]) is an American actress best known for her roles of Grace Stamper in Armageddon and Arwen in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. ... Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955) is an American singer and country music performer, and actress. ... Andrew Dice Clay (born Andrew Clay Silverstein on September 29, 1957, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American comedian and actor. ... The Naked Gun is the name of a series of comedy movies starring Leslie Nielsen, Priscilla Presley and OJ Simpson. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Jeff Nathanson is an American film writer, producer, and director. ... Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio, possibly the hottest actor ever to grace the screen, (born November 11, 1974[1]) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor well known for his roles in blockbuster movies such as William Shakespeares Romeo + Juliet (1996), Titanic (1997), The... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... This article is about the author Thomas Harris. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that studies and treats mental and emotional disorders (see mental illness). ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... A Man Apart - Poster 1 A Man Apart - Poster 2 A Man Apart is a 2003 action film starring Vin Diesel and directed by F. Gary Gray. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vin Diesel (born Mark Vincent on July 18, 1967 in New York City), is an American actor, writer, director, and producer, known for his muscular physique and deep voice. ... DVD cover The Shape of Things is a play by American author and film director Neil LaBute and a 2003 American movie. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Neil LaBute (born March 19, 1963) is an American film director, screenwriter, and playwright. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Stephen Rudd (born April 6, 1969) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... Rachel Weisz (born March 7, 1971) is an Academy Award-winning English film and television actress. ... Gretchen Mol, born November 8, 1972 in Deep River, Connecticut, is an American actress. ... Frederick Weller (born 1966, in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American actor. ... 50 First Dates is a 2004 romantic comedy starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore and directed by Peter Segal. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A romantic comedy may be a film or novel, presenting a story about romance in a comedic style. ... Adam Richard Sandler (born September 9th, 1966) is an American comedian, actor, musician, screenwriter, and film producer. ... Drew Blyth Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an American actress and film producer, the youngest member of the Barrymore family of American actors. ... Peter Segal is a film director born in 1962. ... This article is about the American actor/comedian. ... Sean Astin (born Sean Patrick Duke[1] on February 25, 1971 in Santa Monica, California) is a film actor, director, and Oscar-nominated producer best known for his film roles as Mikey Walsh in The Goonies, the title character of Rudy, Samwise Gamgee in the Lord of the Rings trilogy... The Black Dahlia in common usage may refer to: Black Dahlia - Pertaining to 1940s Hollywood murder victim Elizabeth Short The Black Dahlia (novel) - The novel by James Ellroy, based on the murder The Black Dahlia (film) - The film by Brian De Palma based upon James Ellroys novel The... This is a list of film-related events in 2006. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a prolific, and controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... James Ellroy (born Lee Earle Ellroy on March 4, 1948 in Los Angeles, California) is an American writer. ... Elizabeth Short, better known as the Black Dahlia, is a murder victim, born July 29, 1924 and died January 15, 1947. ... Wanted is a popular song. ...

Television

  • The O.C.(2003)
    • TV-Series 2003-2007
  • The popular television show The O.C. filmed on location in San Pedro; footage taken include 5 scenes in 4 different episodes.
    • Season 1, Episode 21: "The Goodbye Girl" [79]
    • Season 1, Episode 24: "The Proposal" [80]
    • Season 1, Episode 24: "The Proposal" [81]
    • Season 3, Episode 5: "The Perfect Storm" [82]
    • Season 3, Episode 1:"The Aftermath" [83]
  • Covert Action (2002)
    • TV-Series 2002-2003 [84]
  • Robbery Homicide Division (2002)
    • TV-Series 2002-2003 [85]
  • 24 (2001)
    • TV-Series 2001-???? [86]
  • Alias (2001)
    • TV-Series 2001-2006 [87]
  • Fear Factor (2001)
    • TV-Series 2001-2006 [88]
  • Power Rangers in Space (1998)
    • TV-Series 1998-1999 [89]
  • Riptide (1984)
    • TV-Series 1984-1986 [90]
  • Cousin Skeeter (1998) [91]
  • 240-Robert (1979)
    • TV-Series 1979-1981 [92]
  • Waterfront (1954)
    • TV-Series 1954-1956 [93]

The O.C. is an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... The O.C. is an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ... Look up Alias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term alias may refer to— an assumed name, or pseudonym. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Power Rangers in Space (often abbreviated as PRiS or referred to as simply In Space) was a television show, in the Power Rangers franchise. ...

Press

  • Many city residents subscribe to or purchase the local newspaper, the Daily Breeze. In 2003, it created a weekly, More San Pedro, in the San Pedro Harbor Area.

The Daily Breeze is a daily newspaper published in Torrance, California by the Copley Press. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The Los Angeles Newspaper Group is an umbrella group of local daily newspapers published in the greater Los Angeles area. ...

Notable residents

Point Fermin Lighthouse, built in the 19th century, functioned as one of the harbor's two principal lighthouses.
Art
  • Elmer Batters, nylon/foot fetish photographer
  • Mark Machado, better known as "Mister Cartoon", prolific tattoo artist, studio set and CD cover illustrator, co-creator of the Joker line of clothing, jewelry, and leather wear.
Acting
  • Mike Lookinland, who played the youngest brother, Bobby Brady, on "The Brady Bunch" television series from 1969 until 1974, lived in San Pedro while a child actor.
  • Patrick Muldoon, had regular reoccurring roles in the well-known soap operas " Days of Our Lives " and " Melrose Place ". Starred in 1997 film "Starship Troopers".
  • Sharon Tate, actress and wife of Roman Polanski, brutally murdered by the "Manson Family".
  • D.L. Hughley, comedian and actor. Attended San Pedro High School. Currently starring in the NBC series "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip."
Music
  • Ambrosia: Well-known classic rock band with top 40 hits including "You're the Biggest Part of Me" and "(Thats) How Much I Feel".
  • John Bettis: Lyricist for many big artists including: Micheal Jackson, Madonna, The Carpenters, Whitney Houston and others. He has won an Emmy award and has been nominated for an Oscar for his work on the Godfather III theme song.
  • Minutemen: the band members for the influential and eclectic punk rock band grew up in San Pedro and the band was formed there. Bassist/songwriter Mike Watt still lives in San Pedro and is an active participant in its music scene. Drummer George Hurley still lives in San Pedro, as well.
  • Krist Novoselic, the bassist of Nirvana, grew up in San Pedro before moving to Aberdeen, Washington.
  • Jack Anthony, singer/songwriter and lead singer of the Jack Anthony band, was born and raised in San Pedro and has released several punk/rock/pop albums and one EP which contains a song entitled "Averill Park", named after a local San Pedro park. In 2006 MTV filmed a reality show called "Garage Band Makeover" with the band.
  • Art Pepper, Jazz saxophonist, was born and raised there.
  • Brenton Wood, singer and songwriter, his biggest hit "Gimme Little Sign" reached #9 on the pop charts in 1967.
  • Eric Erlandson, co-founder of and lead guitarist for 90's rock/grunge band Hole. 1981 graduate of San Pedro High School. He also attended Holy Trinity Catholic School, Dana Junior High School (now Middle School) and Los Angeles Harbor College.
Politics
  • John S. Gibson, Jr., a Los Angeles City Councilman, lived there until his death in 1981.
  • James Hahn, former Mayor of Los Angeles, is a current resident.
  • Janice Hahn, current City Councilwoman for the 15th district.
  • Xavier Hermosillo, former Chief of Staff for the State of California Republican Party. Former award-winning newsprint reporter, television commentator and radio talk show host.
  • Joe Hill, a radical songwriter, labor activist, and member of the Industrial Workers of the World, lived and worked in San Pedro in the early years of the 20th Century and here began his labor organizing years.
  • Yuri Kochiyama, civil rights activist & Nobel Peace prize nominee. Held a dying Malcolm X in her arms after an assassin had shot him.
  • Mike Lansing, school board member for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Also the Executive Director of the Los Angeles Harbor Boys and Girls Club.
Sports
  • Joe Amalfitano, long-time 3rd base coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Part of the 1981 and 1988 World Series championship teams.
  • Alan Ashby, gold-glove winning catcher for the Houston Astros in the 1970'-1980's.
  • Denise Austin, Fitness guru
  • Ronnie Barber Sr., played tight end for the Kansas City Chiefs in the old AFL.
  • James Cotton, ex-CSULB basketball standout. Sharpshooting guard was selected in the 2nd round by the Seattle Supersonics in the 1997 NBA Draft. Played 2 seasons for Seattle.
  • Joe Danelo, ex-kicker for the New York Giants.
  • Mario Danelo, record setting ex-placekicker for the 2006 NCAA national champion USC Trojans tragically fell to his death in the cliffs overlooking Santa Catalina Island in San Pedro in 2007.
  • Gary Gabelich, set the Guinness Book of World Records driving his rocket-powered "Blue Flame" vehicle for a world land speed record of 622.287 M.P.H. at Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah on October 23, 1970. Record stood for 13 years.
  • Bob Gross, starting small forward for the Portland Trailblazers 1977 NBA championship team.
  • Brian Harper, former starting catcher for the 1991 World Champion Minnesota Twins. Manager of Los Angeles Angels triple-A affiliate Salt Lake City Bees.
  • Dennis Johnson, Boston Celtic and Seattle Supersonic basketball great in the 1970s and 1980s. Won 3 NBA championship rings.
  • Richard Johnson, former USFL and Detroit Lion wide receiver.
  • Ed Jurak, utility infielder for the Boston Red Sox in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Andy Lopez, former head baseball coach of at the University of Florida. Coached Pepperdine University in 1992 to the College World Series title. Currently the head baseball coach at the University of Arizona.
  • Garry Maddox, 8-time golden glove winning and starting center fielder for the 1980 World Champion Philadelphia Phillies.
  • Haven Moses, former starting wide receiver for the Denver Broncos in the 1970s. Started in Super Bowl XII versus the Dallas Cowboys.
  • Willie Naulls, ex-UCLA basketball great. Played power forward/center for New York Knicks and the Boston Celtics. 4-time NBA All-Star with the Knicks in the 1950s. Won 3 NBA Championships with the Celtics in the 1960s.
  • Angela Nikodinov has finished in the top five in the U.S. National Figure Skating Championships 7 times (1996-2004) and placed 4th in the World in 2002.
  • Raul Rojas, boxing lightweight championship contender in the 1960s.
  • Norm Schachter, three time Super Bowl referee in the National Football League.
  • Rob Van Dam, an American professional wrestler
  • Tim Wrightman, ex-UCLA star and starting tight end for the dominant 1985 Super Bowl XX Champion Chicago Bears.
Writers and poets
  • Louis Adamic, 1899-1951 Slovenian-American novelist and journalist who wrote about American minorities & immigrants.
  • Richard Armour, poet and author who wrote over sixty books, was born in San Pedro on July 25, 1906.
  • Charles Bukowski, author and poet, lived there in his later years.[1]
"San Pedro is real quiet. It used to be a seaport full of whorehouses and bars. [The latter are still in abundance.] I like the quietness. They ask you how you're doing, they really want to know."
  • Richard Henry Dana author of the famous memoir "Two Years Before the Mast." Dana was not a resident but rather a famous visitor to San Pedro, who wrote about the experience in his memoir. San Pedro's first middle school is named after him.
"Two days brought us to San Pedro, and two days more (to our no small joy)gave us our last view of that place, which was universally called the hell of California and seemed designed in every way for the wear and tear of sailors. Not even the last view could bring out one feeling of regret. No thanks, thought I, as we left the hated shores in the distance, for the hours I have walked over your stones barefooted, with hides on my head, -- for the burdens I have carried up your steep, muddy hill, --for the duckings in your surf; and for the long days and longer nights passed on your desolate hill, watching piles of hides, hearing the sharp bark of your eternal coyotes, and the dismal hooting of your owls." Excerpt from Two Years Before the Mast [At the time, San Pedro had no dock. Everything had to be loaded onto smaller boats and rowed ashore.]
"In those days it [East San Pedro] was a company town, a ghetto owned and controlled by the canneries. The men went after fish, and whenever the boats came back-day or night-the woman would be called to process the catch while it was fresh. One in the afternoon or four in the morning, it made no difference...I can still hear the whistle--two toots for French's, three for Van Camp's--and she [Mom] and Chizu would be out of bed in the middle of the night, heading for the cannery." Excerpt from Farewell to Manzanar
"The worst times were when he was "on the beach" - on shore, in San Pedro, California, between ships and broke. "I slept in boxcars and under piles of lumber, and took jobs no one else wanted. I was 18 and looked 24. There were several times I went three and four days without eating. I didn't beg or steal, just went without. I'd like to recover for my readers what it's really like to be hungry. I have a penchant for stories about survival, lessons in survival. I've been a survivor most of my life." L'Amour chronicled some of his experiences on the beach in San Pedro in is 1980 book Yondering.."
  • Sandrot Meallet, author of the novel "Edgewater Angels".
"Meallet calls the people he grew up with in the Rancho San Pedro Housing Project ' the most wonderful people I ever knew. These kids had to grow up in a constant state of cultural crisis, always reacting to the police, their messed up parents, and neighborhood gang leaders. It takes superhuman strength to get through it and be aware.' "
  • Scott O'Dell, author of young-adult literature, lived in East San Pedro (Terminal Island) during his childhood.
"Island of the Blue Dolphins, though it is based upon the true story of a girl who lived alone on a California island for eighteen years, came from the memory of my years at San Pedro and Dead Man's Island, when, with other boys my age, I voyaged out on summer mornings in search of adventure."
  • John Shannon, Mystery Novelist
"It was interesting. San Pedro may have been the last great place to grow up in the L.A. area -- a harbor, a real sense of community, a real Left, even a literary history: Charles Bukowski, Louis Adamic, even Richard Henry Dana stayed [here] for a time. I could ride the ferry across to Terminal Island, hang out at the docks, walk down the harbor among the commercial fishing boats with old Sicilians and Croatians mending their nets, catch crawdads in Averill Park."
  • Arthur A. Almeida, local historian and labor writer, was also president of the ILWU local 13. He has written extensively on labor history and has been the president of the San Pedro Bay Historical Society.
Film & Television
  • Lincoln Ruchti - Director of the documentary Chasing Ghosts: Beyond the Arcade[95]
  • Robert Towne, writer, director, producer, actor. Raised in San Pedro. His father owned a popular dress shop that was on 6th Street. One of the best script doctors in Hollywood, he contributed crucial scenes to such films as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and The Godfather (1972). Also wrote Chinatown (1974), Mission Impossible (1996), Mission Impossible II (2000), The Last Detail (1973), Shampoo (1975). The Writers Guild of America recently ranked " Chinatown", behind only "Casablanca" and "The Godfather", as the 3rd greatest English language screenplay of all time [96].
  • Peter V. Manghera, hosts a local cable television talk show. His show, "Pete's Place" has been on the air since February, 1994 and has included many notable personages, including Rep. Jane Harmon (D-CA), Mayor James Hahn, and District Attorneys Steve Cooley and Gil Garcetti.
The Infamous
  • Joe "Pegleg" Morgan, ex-godfather of the Mexican Mafia prison gang. Joe, who was of Croatian-American heritage spent his early years in San Pedro. Moved to East L.A. in his teens. He was the link between the Mexican Mafia and the West Coast Italian crime syndicates criminal activities of the 1970s. Joe Morgan was the character " JD " in Edward James Olmos 1992 movie "American Me".

Image File history File linksMetadata Pointfermin. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pointfermin. ... Categories: People stubs | Fetish photographers | 1919 births | 1997 deaths ... Mister Cartoon is a tattoo and graffiti artist based in LA. He designed the logo for Cypress Hill. ... Mike Lookinland (b. ... Patrick Muldoon (born William Patrick Muldoon III on September 27, 1968 in San Pedro, California) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see Starship Troopers (disambiguation). ... Sharon Marie Tate (January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969) was a Golden Globe-nominated American actress. ... Roman Polański (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award winning film director, writer, actor, producer. ... Darryl Lynn D.L. Hughley (born March 6, 1963) is an African-American actor and comedian and star of the sitcom The Hughleys which ran from 1998 to 2002 first on ABC and then on UPN. D.L. Hughley grew up in South Central Los Angeles and had a rough... The popular music group Ambrosia was formed in the early 1970s, and have ventured into a variety of styles during their history. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... John Bettis is a lyricist who has co-written many famous popular songs over the years. ... The Minutemen were a punk rock band from San Pedro, California comprising singer/guitarist D. Boon, singer/bassist Mike Watt and drummer George Hurley. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Michael David Watt (born December 20, 1957 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is a bass guitarist, singer and songwriter, best-known for co-founding the punk rock bands The Minutemen and fIREHOSE; as of 2003, he is also the bassist for the reunited Iggy Pop & The Stooges. ... George Hurley in 1985. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Tribute to Kurt Cobain in Aberdeen, installed by the Kurt Cobain Memorial Committee. ... Jack Anthony is a pop/rock/punk/powerpop artist/group from San Pedro, CA, that is named after the lead singer, whose solo project slowly evolved into the full band that it is today. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Arthur Edward Pepper, Jr. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A saxophonist is a musician who plays the saxophone. ... Brenton Wood (born Alfred Jesse Smith, 26 July 1941, Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for his two 1967 hit singles: The Oogum Boogum Song and Gimme Little Sign. // When he was a child his family moved west to San Pedro in Los Angeles, California. ... Eric Erlandson (born January 9, 1963) was the lead guitarist for 90s rock/grunge band Hole. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John S. Gibson, Jr. ... The Los Angeles City Council meets three times a week in city hall. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... James Kenneth Jim Hahn (born July 3, 1950) is an American politician from the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of mayors of Los Angeles, California. ... Janice Hahn is a member of the Los Angeles City Council representing the 15th district. ... Joe Hill, born Joel Emmanuel Hägglund, and also known as Joseph Hillström (October 7, 1879 – November 19, 1915) was a radical songwriter, labor activist and member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), also known as the Wobblies. ... Yuri Kochiyama (born May 19, 1922) is a US Japanese-American civil rights activist. ... Mike Lansing (b. ... John Joseph Amalfitano (born January 23, 1934 in San Pedro, California) is an instructor in the farm system of the San Francisco Giants of American Major League Baseball and a former utility infielder, manager and longtime coach at the major-league level. ... Austin as a member of the Presidents Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Denise Austin (maiden name Katnich) is an American fitness and exercise expert, author, columnist and instructor. ... James Jimmy Cotton (born July 1, 1935 in Tunica, Mississippi), is an American blues harmonica player, singer, and songwriter who is the bandleader for the James Cotton Blues Band. ... Joe Danelo (born September 2, 1953 in Spokane, WA) is a retired american football placekicker who played for the National Football League New York Giants, Green Bay Packers and Buffalo Bills between 1975 and 1984. ... Mario Danelo (born July 3, 1985 and died January 6, 2006 in San Pedro, CA) was an american football placekicker. ... Gary Gabelich (born August 29, 1940, died January 1984) was a Croatian-American who won (land speed records are set and not won)the land speed record with his rocket powered automobile Blue Flame on October 23, 1970, achieving the average speed of 622. ... Robert E. Gross, pictured on the cover of Time magazine, January 14, 1946. ... Brian David Harper (born October 16, 1959 in Los Angeles, California) is a former catcher in Major League Baseball who played for teams in both the American and National Leagues during his 16-year career (1979 - 1995). ... Dennis Johnson (September 18, 1954 – February 22, 2007), nicknamed DJ, was an American professional basketball player and coach. ... Richard Johnson may refer to: Richard Johnson, the Somerset and England cricketer; Richard Mentor Johnson, the 19th century United States politician and vice-president; Richard Johnson, the 16th century romance writer; Richard Johnson, the English actor; Reverend Richard Johnson, chaplain to first settlement in New South Wales; Richard Johnson (1830... Edward James Jurak (born October 24, 1957 Los Angeles, California - ) was a utility player with a 6 year career from 1982-1985, 1988-1989. ... Garry Lee Maddox (born September 9, 1949 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former Major League Baseball player known for outstanding defense. ... Haven Moses (born July 27, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is a retired American football wide receiver who played for the National Football League Buffalo Bills and Denver Broncos and made the Pro Bowl in 1969 and 1973. ... William Dean Naulls (born October 7, 1934 in Dallas, Texas) is a retired American basketball player. ... Angela Nikodinov (born May 9, 1980 in Spartanburg, South Carolina), is an American figure skater. ... Norm Schachter Dr. Norm Schachter (1914 – October 5, 2004, born in Brooklyn, New York) was an American football official in the National Football League (NFL) for 22 years from 1954 to 1976. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... NFL redirects here. ... Rob Van Dam (born Robert Alexander Szatkowski on December 18, 1970 in Battle Creek, Michigan), is an inactive American professional wrestler. ... Louis Alojzi Adamic (March 23, 1899 – September 4, 1951) was a Slovenian-American author and translator. ... Richard Armour (1906–1989) was an American poet. ... “Bukowski” redirects here. ... Richard Henry Dana Jr. ... Two Years Before the Mast a book by the American author Richard Henry Dana, Jr. ... Two Years Before the Mast a book by the American author Richard Henry Dana, Jr. ... Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston is a Japanese American writer. ... Cover of the 1983 edition Farewell to Manzanar is a memoir published in 1972 by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Reservation Point at the very southwest tip of Teminal Island. ... Cover of the 1983 edition Farewell to Manzanar is a memoir published in 1972 by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston. ... Cover Louis LAmour book, Showdown at Yellow Butte. ... Yondering is a collection of short stories by popular American author Louis LAmour. ... Scott ODell (May 23, 1898 – October 16, 1989) was an American childrens author who wrote 26 novels for youngsters, along with three adult novels and four nonfiction books. ... Island of the Blue Dolphins is a novel for children, written by Scott ODell. ... A TV movie made in 1996 starring William Shatner and Barbara Eden. ... “Bukowski” redirects here. ... Louis Alojzi Adamic (March 23, 1899 – September 4, 1951) was a Slovenian-American author and translator. ... Richard Henry Dana Jr. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ... Chinatown is a 1974 film directed by Roman Polanski featuring many elements of the film noir genre, particularly a multi-layered story that is part mystery and part psychological drama. ... For other uses, see Casablanca (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1972 film. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Mexican Mafia (MM) or La eMe (eMe) is a Mexican-American criminal prison gang in the United States. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... American Me is a 1992 film directed by Edward James Olmos (his first film as director) and written by Floyd Mutrux and Desmond Nakano. ...

Trivia

  • The short-lived `70's TV series The San Pedro Beach Bums was set in San Pedro. The show spawned the once-legendary line "Football? You bet!".
  • MTV dating television show Next has shot at least one episode in San Pedro. The show has also included residents as contestants as well. [97]

This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... For other meanings, see Next. ...

Reference

  1. ^ Ciotti, Paul. (March 22, 1987) Los Angeles Times Bukowski: He's written more than 40 books, and in Europe he's treated like a rock star. He has dined with Norman Mailer and goes to the race track with Sean Penn. Mickey Rourke and Faye Dunaway are starring in a movie based on his life. At 66, poet Charles Bukowski is suddenly in vogue. Section: Los Angeles Times Magazine; Page 12.

This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ...

External links

  • San Pedro homepage
  • Port of Los Angeles
  • Japanese Immigrants at Terminal Island
  • Japanese Immigrants at White Point
  • Port of Los Angeles Waterfront Red Car Line
  • Furasato: The lost Village of Terminal Island
  • Citizens For A Harbor Line
  • Croatian community.
  • Random Lengths news weekly
  • Southern California Croats
  • San Pedro/Los Angeles Croatians
  • Maps and aerial photos for 33°44′09″N 118°17′29″W / 33.73583, -118.29139Coordinates: 33°44′09″N 118°17′29″W / 33.73583, -118.29139
    • Maps from WikiMapia, Google Maps, Live Search Maps, Yahoo! Maps, or MapQuest
    • Topographic maps from TopoZone or TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
San Pedro: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (1563 words)
San Pedro is connected to Los Angeles by a thin strip of land called the "Harbor Gateway" which roughly follows the 110 freeway.
San Pedro was a magnet for European immigrants from various countries for years, reflected in the number of restaurants representing diverse cuisines, especially Portuguese, Croatian, Italian, Greek and Côte D'Ivoirian, Somalian, Bosnian, Turkish, and Mongolian.
San Pedro is also considered a heart of the Croatian community in Los Angeles and the community, originally comprised of seafarers and fishermen from the Dalmatia (especially the islands of Brač, Hvar, Vis and Korčula) region, has been present in San Pedro since European settlement began over 200 years ago.
Los Angeles, California (3695 words)
Los Angeles is the largest city in the federal state of California, and since 1984 the second largest in the United States, when it ousted Chicago from that position.
Los Angeles is raised by the Mexicans to the rank of ciudad (city) and in a short time becomes the capital of Alta California.
Los Angeles is re-conquered; the capitulation in Cahuenga signals the defeat of the Californios and with it the ceding of Alta California to the United States.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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