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Encyclopedia > San José State University

San Jose State University


Download high resolution version (1000x750, 410 KB)Tower Hall and Morris Dailey Auditorium on the campus of San Jose State University. ...

Motto Powering Silicon Valley
Established 1857
School type Public
President Don Kassing
Location San Jose, California, USA
Enrollment 21,396 undergraduate,
7,536 graduate
Faculty 1,685
Campus Urban, 154 acres (623,000 m²)
Mascot Spartans
Website www.sjsu.edu

San José State University, commonly shortened to San Jose State and SJSU, is the oldest university in what became the California State University system. The urban campus has an enrollment of about 30,000 students, and claims to have more graduates working in Silicon Valley than any other college or university. 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The term public school has different meanings: In England and Wales, one of a small number of prestigious historic schools open to the public which normally charge fees and are financed by bodies other than the state, commonly as private charitable trusts; here the word public is used much as... City nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location within Santa Clara County, California Country   State     County United States   California     Santa Clara Mayor Ron Gonzales Area  - Land  - Water 178. ... Urban is in or having to do with cities, as distinct from rural areas. ... The CSU Seal The California State University (CSU) system has a combined 23 campuses, 414,000 students, and 44,000 faculty and staff, making it the largest university system in the United States. ... Silicon Valley is a commonly used nickname for the southern part of the San Francisco Bay Area in northern California, USA, originally referring to the concentration of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually becoming a metaphor for the entire concentration of high tech businesses. ...

Contents

Campus

The main campus is a rectangular area in downtown San Jose, California, bordered by San Fernando Street (north), Fourth Street (west), San Salvador Street (south), and Tenth Street (east). Campus is Latin for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... City nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location within Santa Clara County, California Country   State     County United States   California     Santa Clara Mayor Ron Gonzales Area  - Land  - Water 178. ...


The original Washington Square campus consisted of a rectangular, wooden building with a central grass quadrangle. The wooden buildings were destroyed by fire in 1880, and were replaced by a stone and masonry structure of roughly the same configuration in 1881. This building was declared unsafe following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and was in the process of being torn down when an aftershock of the magnitude that was predicted to destroy the building occurred and no damage was observed. The demolition was stopped, and the portions of the building still standing were made into four halls: Tower Hall, Morris Dailey Auditorium, Washington Square Hall, and Dwight Bentel Hall. These four buildings are the oldest on campus. 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was a major earthquake at San Francisco, California on the early morning of Wednesday, April 18, 1906. ... Aftershocks are earthquakes of smaller magnitude that follow a large quake. ...

Paseo San Carlos runs through campus, along the former route of San Carlos Street

Formerly, San Carlos Street, Seventh Street and Ninth Street crossed the campus, creating essentially six small schools separated by roads clogged with traffic. Beginning in the fall of 1994, the streets were closed and converted to pedestrian walkways and green belts within the campus. San Carlos Street was renamed Paseo San Carlos, Seventh Street became El Paseo de César Chávez, and Ninth Street is now called the Ninth Street Plaza. As of 2004, all the dorms on the main campus are scheduled to be torn down and replaced with updated student housing. Three of the six brick blockhouses have been demolished, and the phase one of the new student village is scheduled to be completed in 2005. Following the completion of phase one, the remaining blockhouses and Joe West Hall will be demolished and replaced with phase two of the project. Paseo San Carlos on the campus of San Jose State University. ... Paseo San Carlos on the campus of San Jose State University. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... César Chávez, middle-aged César Estrada Chávez (March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) founded the National Farm Workers Association that later became the United Farm Workers. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The university boasts a year-round, outdoor Olympic-size swimming pool that is the largest in Northern California. The Event Center has basketball and racquetball courts, a small weight room, and a climbing wall. It also plays host to rock concerts and other events. The student union features a bowling alley and large game room.


Spartan Stadium, the other athletic fields, additional student housing and overflow parking are located on the South Campus on Seventh Street, about 1.5 miles south of the main campus. Spartan Stadium, located in San Jose, California, is the football stadium of the San Jose State University Spartans. ...


San Jose State maintains a facility at Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport as part of the Aviation Department, and manages the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories in Moss Landing, California, on the Monterey Bay, a cooperative research facility of seven CSU campuses. The Norman Y. Mineta San José International Airport is a medium-sized airport in San José, California. ... The Moss Landing Marine Laboratories is a multi-campus research facility of the California State University, administered by San Jose State University, and located in Moss Landing, California. ... Moss Landing is a census-designated place located in Monterey County, California. ... Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, on the coast of California, south of San Francisco. ...


Organization

As a university of the California State University System, San Jose State falls under the jurisdiction of the California State University Board of Trustees and the Chancellor of the California State University. The current Chancellor is Charles B. Reed.


The chief executive of San Jose State is the President of San Jose State University. The current president is Don Kassing, who was appointed to the position on May 11, 2005 after serving as acting president for less than a year. The former President was Paul Yu, who assumed the presidency on July 15, 2004, and resigned a little over two weeks later on August 2, 2004. Officially, Yu resigned due to health reasons. The University Provost is the head of the academic affairs department of the university. Marshall Goodman "resigned" from this position in Fall 2004. Carmen Sigler took over as interim provost. May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the higher education title of provost. ...


San Jose State offers 69 bachelors degrees with 81 concentrations, and 65 masters degrees with 29 concentrations.


The university has eight colleges:

  • Applied Sciences & Arts [1] (http://www.sjsu.edu/casa/)
  • Business [2] (http://www.cob.sjsu.edu/)
  • Education [3] (http://sweeneyhall.sjsu.edu/)
  • Engineering [4] (http://engr.sjsu.edu/)
  • Humanities & the Arts [5] (http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/hum_arts/)
  • Science [6] (http://www.science.sjsu.edu/)
  • Social Sciences [7] (http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/SocialSciences/socsci.htm)
  • Social Work [8] (http://www.sjsu.edu/socialwork/)

as well as schools of Journalism, Library & Information Science [9] (http://witloof.sjsu.edu/), Music & Dance, and the Office of International and Extended Services [10] (http://ies.sjsu.edu/), which coordinates continuing education and professional development programs.


Students

The campus has approximately 30,000 students. It is one of the most ethnically diverse in the nation, with large Asian (particularly Filipino and Vietnamese) and Latino enrollments. The majority of students are commuters who live outside the immediate area of the campus. As a result, student participation in campus and university activities is quite low for a university of its size. For example, voter turnout for Associated Student elections is generally less than 2,000 [11] (http://www.thespartandaily.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/03/22/405e935c77f95). Additionally, sporting events are poorly attended, even though students receive free tickets. The football program is in danger of losing NCAA Division I-A standing because of the attendance requirement. In 2004, the average crowd at home football games numbered about 6,000, significantly lower than the NCAA required average attendance of 15,000. The football team lost more than $500,000 on a single day in the disastrous Read-2-Lead Classic in September 2004. In the United States, Latino refers to non-Anglo-American citizens who are living in the United States of America and are of Latin American background, also referred to as Hispanic. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Read-2-Lead Classic was an attempt to help the struggling San Jose State University football team achieve average attendance of 15,000 to retain NCAA Division I-A status. ...


The engineering, science and business schools claim to have more graduates in Silicon Valley than any other school in the U.S. Silicon Valley is a commonly used nickname for the southern part of the San Francisco Bay Area in northern California, USA, originally referring to the concentration of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually becoming a metaphor for the entire concentration of high tech businesses. ...


The school newspaper, the Spartan Daily, was founded in 1934, and is published five days a week when classes are in session. KSJS, 90.5 FM, is the university's radio station. Broadcasting with 1500 watts 24 hours a day, KSJS is a student-training ground that features five different types of music (electronic, urban, jazz, subversive rock and rock en espanol), as well as a variety of public affairs programming. 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... KSJS (90. ...


Faculty and research

The Central Classroom Building

San Jose State has about 1,600 faculty members, 87 percent of which hold doctorate degrees. The Central Classroom Building at San Jose State University. ... The Central Classroom Building at San Jose State University. ...


Research collections located at SJSU include the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies and the Martha H. Cox Center for Steinbeck Research.


SJSU research partnerships include the SJSU Metropolitan Technology Center at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, the Cisco Networking Laboratory, and the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. Aerial View of Moffett Field and NASA Ames Research Center. ... Aerial View of Moffett Field and NASA Ames Research Center. ... Cisco Systems, Inc. ...


It is also home to various institutes, such as the Mineta Transportation Institute. Since 2001, the university has operated the Survey and Policy Research Institute (SPRI), which conducts the quarterly, high-profile Silicon Valley Consumer Confidence Survey and other research projects.


Noted faculty members

  • Elbert Botts -- chemist, inventor of the epoxy used to secure Botts dots.
  • Mark Fruin -- expert on Japanese business
  • Alejandro L. Garcia [12] (http://www.algarcia.org) -- physicist, author of Numerical Methods for Physics
  • Larry Gerston -- political commentator, expert on California politics and co-author of Recall: California's Political Earthquake
  • Daniel Goldston -- mathematician, develops methods for proving that there are arbitrarily large primes that are unusually close together
  • Kevin Jordan -- psychologist, works closely with NASA in developing the Human Factors Research and Technology Program
  • Tom Layton -- archaeologist, documented origin of the shipwreck "Frolic" off the Mendocino coast, for which he has received national media attention
  • Rudy Rucker -- computer science professor and science fiction author
  • Randall Stross - author of eBoys, Microsoft Secrets and Steve Jobs and the NeXT Big Thing
  • Yoshi Uchida -- head coach, SJSU Judo Team, 1964 U.S. Olympic Judo Team (also an alumnus -- BS Biology, 1947)
  • Donald West -- chemist, co-author of Analytical chemistry, an introduction, the standard first year textbook in the field

The orange markers seperate opposing traffic lanes. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Rudy von Bitter Rucker (born March 22, 1946) is an American computer scientist and science fiction author, often included in lists of cyberpunk authors. ... The Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held in 1964 in Japan. ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

History

Bell commissioned for the California Normal School in 1862

San Jose State was founded in 1857 as Minns' Evening Normal School, as a city funded normal school in San Francisco, California, and is the oldest public institution of higher learning on the west coast. In 1862, the California legislature took possession of the school, renaming it the California State Normal School. The school moved to San Jose in 1871, becoming San Jose Normal School, and was given Washington Square Park at Fourth and San Carlos Streets to locate their campus, where it remains. Download high resolution version (699x933, 451 KB)Bell presented to the California Normal School in 1862. ... Download high resolution version (699x933, 451 KB)Bell presented to the California Normal School in 1862. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A normal school is a institution for training teachers. ... San Francisco skyline. ... The West Coast States. ... 1862 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1921, the legislature changed the school's name to San Jose Teachers Training College. In 1935, the name was changed again, this time to San Jose State College. In 1961, SJSC joined the California State College System (later the California State University (CSU) system). In 1972 SJSC was granted university status, and the name was changed to CSU, San Jose. In 1974 the name was changed again, this time to San Jose State University. 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year—i. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ...


In 1942, the old gym (now Yoshi Uchida Hall) was used to register and collect Japanese Americans before sending them to internment camps. 1942 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... The Japanese American internment refers to the exclusion and subsequent removal of approximately 112,000 to 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, officially described as persons of Japanese ancestry, 62 percent of whom were United States citizens, from the west coast of the United States during World War II to...


The English Department has sponsored the annual Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest since 1982. The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest is a tongue-in-cheek contest that takes place annually and is sponsored by the English Department of San Jose State University. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British...


In 1999, San Jose State and the City of San Jose agreed to combine their main libraries to form a joint City/University library located on campus, the first known collaboration of this type in the United States. The combined library faced opposition, with critics stating that the two libraries have very different objectives and that the project would be too expensive. [13] (http://www.ala.org/ala/alonline/currentnews/newsarchive/1999/march1999/legislativeanalyst.htm) [14] (http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/11.13.97/library-9746.html) Despite opposition, the project proceeded, and the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Library opened on-time and on-budget in 2003. 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Main entrance to the Martin Luther King, Jr. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sports

The university has participated in athletics since it fielded a baseball team in 1890. SJSU sports teams are known as the Spartans, and compete in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) in NCAA Division I (I-A for football). The school has achieved an international reputation in judo, having won 38 out of 42 national championships in the sport (as of 2004). Additionally, SJSU students and alumni have won more than half of the U.S.'s olympic medals in judo. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced whack) was formed in 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 College Athletic Conferences currently affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I-A. The WAC covers a broad expanse of the western United States, with member institutions... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On December 7, 1941, the football team travelled to the island of Oahu to play the University of Hawaii. When Pearl Harbor was bombed, the game was cancelled and the team volunteered for duty with the Honolulu Police Department instead of returning home. December 7 is the 341st day (342nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Island of O‘ahu. ... Jean Charlots mural called Commencement is featured at Bachman Hall, the administrative center of the University of Hawai`i System. ... Satellite image of Pearl Harbor. ... Police Chief Lee Donohue on the left honors Police Chaplain Andrew Kikuta during a June 28, 2000 ceremony at police headquarters. ...


On April 21, 2004, the Academic Senate voted in favor of terminating the 110 year old football program and withdrawing from the WAC for budgetary reasons. The following month, the entire faculty voted by a 3-1 margin in favor of the elimination of football. Although these votes were only advisory, they were seen as putting pressure on the new president, due to be announced later that week. The university has had problems with the football program for several decades. The university has produced just one winning record in football following the 1990 season. Additionally, Spartan Stadium will require significant upgrades in the near future for the university to stay in Division 1-A. April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1989 in sports, 1991 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing Stock car racing: Derrike Cope won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Dale Earnhardt CART Racing - Al Unser, Jr. ...


On September 18, 2004, the SJSU Spartans football team hosted the "Read-2-Lead Classic," an event designed to boost attendance and save the program. The university expected a sell-out of 28,000. The paid attendance was less than 11,000. The Spartans ended the 2004 season with an average attendance of less than 7,000, the lowest in all of Division I-A football. Although the administration has announced another attempt to save the program, local insiders have all but written it off. September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Read-2-Lead Classic was an attempt to help the struggling San Jose State University football team achieve average attendance of 15,000 to retain NCAA Division I-A status. ...


SJSU alumni have won 18 Olympic medals through the years, dating back to the first gold medal won by Willie Steel in track and field in the 1948 Olympics. Alumni have won medals in track and field, swimming, judo and boxing. Due to the pressure to maintain funding for football, several of these programs have been eliminated, including the historical track team known as "Speed City" which produced Olympic medalists and social activists John Carlos and Tommie Smith. Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. ... Judo (Japanese: 柔道 Jūdō) is a martial art, a sport and a philosophy which originated in Japan. ... For other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... John Wesley Carlos (born June 5, 1945) is a former American champion athlete and bronze medal winner at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. ... Tommie Smith (born June 5, 1944) is a former American athlete, winner of 200 m run at the 1968 Summer Olympics. ...


Rivals

California State University, Fresno, commonly referred to as Fresno State, is one of the campuses of California State University, located in Fresno, California. ... The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is a university that is located in Reno, Nevada and is known for its programs in agricultural research, animal biotechnology, and mining-related natural sciences. ...

Noted alumni

The College of Engineering Building

Download high resolution version (699x933, 333 KB)The Engineering Building of San Jose State University. ... Download high resolution version (699x933, 333 KB)The Engineering Building of San Jose State University. ... Tariq Abdul-Wahad (born November 3, 1974) is a professional basketball player. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Bernd Behr (born 1976) is a German-born artist. ... Dr. Lee P. Brown had a successful career in law enforcement for almost four decades before being elected the mayor of Houston, Texas on December 6, 1997. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Skyline of Downtown Houston from Eleanor Tinsley Park Located in southeast Texas, Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States and one of the two largest economic areas in Texas. ... The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), a component of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, was established in 1988 by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act. ... Law and Order (1981) was Lindsey Buckinghams first solo album Lindsey Buckingham (born October 3, 1949 in Palo Alto, California) is a guitarist and singer from the musical group Fleetwood Mac. ... Stephanie Lynn Stevie Nicks (born May 26, 1948 in Phoenix, Arizona) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work with Fleetwood Mac. ... Fleetwood Mac is a rock group led by Mick Fleetwood and John McVie (whose names partially form the groups name), who had their biggest hits in the 1970s. ... Ben Nighthorse Campbell (born April 13, 1933) is an American politician. ... This is the article on the state. ... Christopher Darden is an American lawyer. ... O.J. Simpson at USC. Orenthal James Simpson (born July 9, 1947), known by the initials O.J. (a common American abbreviation for orange juice) and nicknamed The Juice, is a Hall of Fame former college and professional football player and film actor. ... Dian Fossey ( January 16, 1932, San Francisco, California, United States - December 27, 1985, Ruhengeri, Rwanda) was an American ethologist interested in gorillas, completing an extended study of several gorilla groups, observing them daily for years in the mountain forests of Rwanda. ... Ethology is the scientific study of animal behaviour (particularly of social animals such as primates and canids), and is a branch of zoology. ... Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the primates, is a ground-dwelling herbivore that inhabits the forests of central Africa. ... Jeff Garcia (born February 24, 1970 in Gilroy, California) is a Canadian football and American football quarterback. ... Conference NFC Division West Founded 1946 Home Field Monster Park City San Francisco, California Colors Cardinal red and gold, with black trim Head Coach Mike Nolan All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 498-379-15 The San Francisco 49ers are a National Football League team... Conference AFC Division North Founded 1946 Home Field Cleveland Browns Stadium City Cleveland, Ohio Colors Seal brown and orange Head Coach Romeo Crennel All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 467-356-13 The Cleveland Browns are a National Football League team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Krazy George Henderson is the self-proclaimed Worlds Sexiest Professional Cheerleader, and the inventor of the audience wave. ... The audience wave (also called a Mexican wave) is a sporting events, and sometimes in other large crowds. ... Michael M. Honda (born June 27, 1941) is an American Democratic politician. ... Jayne Ann Krentz is an American author of romantic novels. ... Brian Brain Mantia is a drummer. ... Primus has multiple meanings, generally derived from the Latin word meaning the first one. For campers and soldiers liquid-hydrocarbon primus stoves see portable stove#history. ... The original line-up of Guns N Roses. ... Gordon Moore Gordon Earl Moore (born January 3, 1929) is co-founder of Intel Corporation and the author of Moores law. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) (founded 1968) is a US-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... University of California, Berkeley The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a public coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California, USA to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate. ... Gaylord Anton Nelson (born June 4, 1916) was an American politician. ... One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... Kurtwood Smith (born July 3, 1943) was born in New Lisbon, Wisconsin, but was raised in California. ... Tommie Smith (born June 5, 1944) is a former American athlete, winner of 200 m run at the 1968 Summer Olympics. ... The Games of the XIX Olympiad were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... Black Power is a slogan which describes the aspiration of many Africans (whether they be in Africa or abroad) to national self-determination. ... John Wesley Carlos (born June 5, 1945) is a former American champion athlete and bronze medal winner at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. ... The Smothers Brothers are an American musical-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom (born 1937) and Dick Smothers (born 1939). ... Tom Smothers (born February 2, 1937) is an American comedian, composer and musician from New York, New York. ... Dick Smothers (born November 20, 1938) is an American comedian, composer and musician from New York, New York. ... Amy Tan (Chinese: 譚恩美; pinyin: Tán Ēnměi) (born February 19, 1952) is a Chinese American author. ... Peter Victor Ueberroth (born September 2, 1937 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American sports executive. ... The Games of the XXIII Olympiad were held in 1984 in Los Angeles, sports Opening ceremonies July 28, 1984 Closing ceremonies August 12, 1984 Officially opened by Ronald Reagan Athletes Oath Edwin Moses Judges Oath Sharon Weber Olympic Torch Rafer Johnson Highlights After the American-led boycott of... Person of the Year is an annual issue of U.S. newsmagazine TIME that features a profile ostensibly on the man, woman, couple, group, idea, place, or machine that for better or worse, has most influenced events in the preceding year. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Dick Vermeil (born October 30, 1936, Calistoga, California) is an American Football Head Coach. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Bill Walsh is a former American football head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and Stanford University. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Michael Whelan (born June 29, 1950) is a multiple award winning American artist specializing in science fiction and fantasy illustration. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. ... Shaykh Hamza Yusuf Hanson was born in Walla Walla, Washington and was raised in Northern California in a Greek Orthodox family. ...

External links


California State University

   Bakersfield | Channel Islands | Chico | Dominguez Hills | East Bay | Fresno | Fullerton   
Humboldt | Long Beach | Los Angeles | Maritime | Monterey Bay | Northridge
Pomona | Sacramento | San Bernardino | San Diego | San Francisco | San Jose
San Luis Obispo | San Marcos | Sonoma | Stanislaus The CSU Seal The California State University (CSU) system has a combined 23 campuses, 414,000 students, and 44,000 faculty and staff, making it the largest university system in the United States. ... California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), located in Bakersfield, California, was founded in 1965. ... California State University, Channel Islands (CSUCI) is located in Camarillo, California. ... California State University, Chico California State University, Chico is the second_oldest campus in the California State University system. ... California State University, Dominguez Hills is in the California State University system and is located in Carson, California. ... California State University, East Bay (CSUEB, formerly California State University, Hayward, and called CalState Hayward or Hayward State) is a branch of the California State University system. ... California State University, Fresno, commonly referred to as Fresno State, is one of the campuses of California State University, located in Fresno, California. ... California State University, Fullerton The California State University, Fullerton, often referred to as Cal State Fullerton, is a part of the California State University System located in Fullerton, California. ... Humboldt State University is the northernmost campus of the California State University system, and is located in Arcata, California, about 300 miles north of San Francisco, on a hillside with a view of the Pacific Ocean. ... California State University, Long Beach (also known as Long Beach State, Cal State Long Beach, CSULB or the Beach!) is the largest campus of the California State University system located in Long Beach, California, at the southern coastal tip of Los Angeles County. ... Cal State LA campus California State University, Los Angeles (often shortened and referred to as CSULA or Cal State LA) is a state-run public university located in Los Angeles (near Alhambra). ... The California Maritime Academy is one of 23 campuses in the California State University system. ... California State University, Monterey Bay, in the California State University sytem, is located in the city of Seaside, California. ... A state-funded university in Northridge, California, part of the California State University System, formerly the San Fernando Valley State College. ... California State Polytechnic University, Pomona The California State Polytechnic University, Pomona is a public, coeducational university situated at the western corner of the city of Pomona, a suburb of Los Angeles, California, and next to Mt. ... California State University, Sacramento, better known as Sacramento State, Sac State, or CSUS, is a public university located in the city of Sacramento, California. ... California State University, San Bernardino is a state-funded university in San Bernardino, California, part of the California State University System. ... San Diego State University (SDSU), founded in 1897, is the largest and oldest higher education facility in the greater San Diego area, and is part of the California State University system. ... San Francisco State University is a branch of the California State University system. ... Cal Poly San Luis Obispo California Polytechnic State University, popularly known as Cal Poly, is a public coeducational university located in San Luis Obispo, California. ... California State University, San Marcos (also known as CSUSM or Cal State San Marcos) opened in 1990 as the 20th campus of the California State University system, the first new campus in nearly 30 years. ... Sonoma State University is a campus of the California State University system located in Rohnert Park, California (about seven miles south of Santa Rosa). ... California State University, Stanislaus, a campus in the California State University system, was established in 1957 in Turlock, California. ...


Not GFDL. CSU seal assumed to be trademark of California State University. ...

Western Athletic Conference
Boise State | Fresno State | Hawaiʻi | Louisiana Tech | Nevada | San Jose State
   Leaving in July 2005: Rice | SMU | Tulsa | UTEP   
Joining in July 2005: Idaho | New Mexico State | Utah State


 
 

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