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Encyclopedia > San Francisco Symphony
San Francisco Symphony

Background information
Also known as  SFS
Origin Flag of the United States San Francisco, California, USA
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Symphony Orchestra
Years active December 1911–present
Label(s) BMG, Decca, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, RCA Victor, SFS Media
Associated
acts
SFS Chorus
SFS Youth Orchestra
Website www.sfsymphony.org
Members
Music Director
Michael Tilson Thomas
Conductor Laureate
Herbert Blomstedt
Associate Conductor
James Gaffigan
SFS Chorus Conductor
Ragnar Bohlin
Former members
Founder
Henry Hadley
Notable instrument(s)
Concert Organ
Fratelli Ruffatti 5-147

The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) is a leading orchestra based in San Francisco, California. The current music director is Michael Tilson Thomas, who has held the position since September 1995. Image File history File links Acap. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 267 pixelsFull resolution (1041 × 348 pixel, file size: 151 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Multiple image composite of the interior of Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the 2000s . ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ... Philips Records is a record label that was founded by Dutch electronics giant Philips. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... The San Francisco Symphony Chorus is the resident chorus of the San Francisco Symphony (SFS). ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... Herbert Blomstedt (b. ... Henry Hadley (born 20 December 1871, Somerville, Massachusetts, died 6 September 1937, New York City) was an American composer and conductor. ... Famiglia Artigiana Fratelli Ruffatti Famiglia Artigiana Fratelli Ruffatti (Ruffatti Brothers, Family of Artisans) is a manufacturer of pipe organs based in Padua, Italy. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ...

Contents

History

The orchestra has long been an integral part of city life and culture in San Francisco. Its first concerts were led by conductor composer Henry Hadley, who founded the Seattle Symphony Orchestra two years earlier. There were only sixty musicians in the orchestra at the beginning of that first season. The first concert included music by Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Haydn, and Liszt. There were thirteen concerts in the 1911-1912 season, five of which were pops concerts. Henry Hadley (born 20 December 1871, Somerville, Massachusetts, died 6 September 1937, New York City) was an American composer and conductor. ... The Seattle Symphony Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Seattle, Washington. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... (Franz) Joseph Haydn (in German, Josef; he never used the Franz) (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was a leading composer of the classical period. ... Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ...

Alfred Hertz on the cover of Time magazine.

Hadley was followed in 1915 by Alfred Hertz, who had conducted for many years at the Metropolitan Opera and had even appeared with the company during their historic performances in San Francisco in April 1906, just prior to the earthquake and fire. Hertz helped to refine the orchestra and convinced the Victor Talking Machine Company to record it in Oakland in early 1925. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alfred Hertz was featured on the cover of Time magazine, October 31 1927 Alfred Hertz (born July 15, 1872 in Frankfurt, died April 17, 1942 in San Francisco, was a German-American conductor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


After Hertz's official retirement in 1930, the orchestra was led by two conductors, Basil Cameron and Issay Dobrowen. During the Great Depression, when the Symphony's existence was threatened by bankruptcy and the 1934-35 season was cancelled, the people of San Francisco passed a bond measure to provide public financing and ensure the organization's continued existence. The famous French maestro Pierre Monteux (1875-1964), who had conducted the world premiere of Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, was hired to restore the orchestra. Monteux was so successful in improving the orchestra that NBC began broadcasting some of its concerts and RCA Victor offered the orchestra a new recording contract in 1941. In 1949, Monteux invited Arthur Fiedler to lead summer "pops" concerts in the Civic Auditorium. Fiedler also conducted the orchestra at free concerts in Sigmund Stern Grove and the Frost Amphitheater at Stanford University. Fiedler's relationship with the orchestra continued until the mid 1970's. Basil Cameron (born August 18, 1884 in Reading, Berkshire, died June 26, 1975 in Leominster) was an English conductor. ... Issay Dobrowen (1891-1953) was a pianist, composer and conductor, originally from Russia. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Pierre Monteux (April 4, 1875 – July 1, 1964) was an orchestra conductor. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... The Rite of Spring is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, locally called Stern Grove, is a 33-acre recreational site two miles south of the Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, California administered by the San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ...

Pierre Monteux
Enrique Jorda in 1954

When Monteux left the orchestra in 1952, various conductors led the orchestra, including Leopold Stokowski, Georg Solti, Erich Leinsdorf, Karl Munchinger, George Szell, Bruno Walter, Ferenc Fricsay, and William Steinberg. Stokowski even made a series of RCA Victor recordings with the orchestra. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... Sir Georg Solti, KBE (pronounced IPA: ) (21 October 1912 – 5 September 1997) was a world-renowned Hungarian-British orchestral and operatic conductor. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... Karl Münchinger (May 29, 1915 – March 13, 1990) was a German conductor of European classical music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bruno Walter (Bruno Walter Schlesinger) (September 15, 1876 – February 17, 1962) was a German-born conductor and composer. ... Ferenc Fricsay (1914 - 20 February 1963) was a Hungarian conductor. ... William Steinberg (originally Hans Wilhelm Steinberg) (August 1, 1899 – May 16, 1978) was a German Jewish conductor. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ...


It was two years before the board decided to hire the young Spanish maestro Enrique Jordá to be the next music director. From surviving eyewitness and newspaper accounts, Jordá began his association with great promise. He had youthful enthusiasm, energy, and charm. Nevertheless, Jorda sometimes conducted so vigorously that his baton flew from his hand. As the years passed, Jordá reportedly failed to maintain discipline or provide real leadership and the orchestra faltered. George Szell (1897-1970), the longtime music director of the Cleveland Orchestra, guest conducted the orchestra in 1962 and was so dismayed by the lack of discipline that he publicly condemned Jordá and even chastised San Francisco Chronicle music critic Alfred Frankenstein for commending Jorda and the orchestra. Szell's comments, along with growing dissatisfaction among musicians and the public, led the symphony board to make a change. Enrique Jordá (born San Sebastian, Spain, 1911, died Brussels, Belgium, 1996) was a Spanish-American conductor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Alfred Frankenstein (1906-1981) was an art and music critic, author and professional musician. ...

Josef Krips
Josef Krips

In the fall of 1963, the Austrian conductor Josef Krips (1902-1974) became music director. He quickly became known as a benevolent autocrat who would not tolerate sloppy playing. He worked to inspire the musicians, too, and soon began to refine their performances, particularly of the standard German-Austrian repertoire. One of his innovations was to begin an annual tradition on New Year's Eve, "A Night in Old Vienna." which was devoted to music of Johann Strauss and other Viennese masters of the nineteenth century. Similar concerts have continued to this day, though the format has changed somewhat in recent years. Krips would not make recordings with the orchestra, insisting they weren't ready. He did agree to allow KKHI to broadcast some of the Friday evening concerts. He also paved the way for his successor when he invited the young Japanese conductor Seiji Ozawa (b. 1935) to guest conduct the orchestra; Ozawa quickly impressed critics and audiences with his fiery Bernstein-like conducting, particularly in the performances of the Mussorgsky-Ravel Pictures at an Exhibition, the Tchaikovsky fourth symphony, and Symphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz. Krips retired at the end of the 1969-70 season and only returned once, to guest conduct the orchestra in Stern Grove, before his death in 1974. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Josef Alois Krips (born 8 April 1902 in Vienna, died 13 October 1974 in Geneva) was an Austrian conductor and violinist. ... Johann Strauss is the name of three famous Austrian composers: Johann Strauss I (1804-1849), or Johann Strauss Sr. ... KKHIs AM radio transmitter building in 1976 KKHI was a classical music station in San Francisco, California operating on both AM (at 1550 kHz) and FM (at 95. ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Моде́ст Петро́вич Му́соргский) (March 21, 1839 – March 28, 1881; sometimes spelt Modeste Moussorgsky), was an innovative Russian composer famed for his colourful... Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist, best known for his orchestral work, Boléro, and his famous 1922 orchestral arrangement of Modest Mussorgskys Pictures at an Exhibition. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Symphonie fantastique (Fantastic Symphony) Opus 14, is a symphony written by French composer Hector Berlioz in 1830. ... Painting of Berlioz by Gustave Courbet, 1850. ...

Seiji Ozawa

The Ozawa era began in late 1970 with great excitement. His guest appearances had already generated enthusiasm. Now it suddenly became difficult to find seats at his concerts. He greatly improved the quality of the orchestra's performances and was able to convince Deutsche Grammophon (DG) to record the orchestra in 1972. A special concert series devoted to Romeo and Juliet, as interpreted by Hector Berlioz, Peter Tchaikovsky, and Sergei Prokofiev with the Leonard Bernstein symphonic dances from West Side Story, inspired DG to record the same music with Ozawa. He was known for considerable innovations, such as presenting partially-staged versions of La vida breve by Manuel de Falla and Beatrice and Benedict by Berlioz. He even had dancers on the stage for some modern ballets performed by the orchestra. For a few seasons Ozawa continued the practice of using university choruses whenever needed; then he decided to form a San Francisco Symphony Chorus so that he could be ensured of consistent singing. Ozawa talked of staying in San Francisco for many years, especially after he bought a house in the city. Then he agreed to also become music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He conducted both in Boston and San Francisco, then decided to give up San Francisco, possibly because of a disagreement with the players committee over granting tenure to two young musicians he admired. After leaving San Francisco, Ozawa has returned only twice as guest conductor. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Painting of Berlioz by Gustave Courbet, 1850. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... This article is about the musical. ... La vida breve (Life is Short) is an opera in two acts by Manuel de Falla to an original Spanish libretto by Carlos Fernandez-Shaw. ... Manuel de Falla y Matheu (November 23, 1876 – November 14, 1946) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... Béatrice et Bénédict (Beatrice and Benedict) is a comic opera in two acts by Hector Berlioz. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie Fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Requiem of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds premiere orchestras. ...

Edo de Waart

Ozawa was followed by Edo de Waart, the young Dutch conductor, who brought an entirely new face to the orchestra. He was not as flamboyant as Ozawa and some audiences missed the showmanship. However, de Waart maintained the orchestra's high standards, leading to additional recordings, including its very first digital sessions. He conducted the orchestra's very first performances in Davies Symphony Hall in September 1980, including the nationally-televised gala. At this point the regular season was greatly extended, beginning in September and lasting until May, while musicians had to decide whether to play in the Symphony, or the Opera and Ballet. A mammoth Fratelli Ruffatti concert organ featuring five manuals, 147 registers and 9235 pipes, was soon added to the new hall. This organ was used in the orchestra's performance of the spectacular recording of Saint Saens' third symphony with Michael Murray as soloist. Philips also taped Joseph Jongen's Symphonie Concertante and César Franck's Fantaisie in A. A highlight of de Waart's final season, 1984-85, was four outstanding, sold-out performances of Mahler's mammoth eighth symphony, utilizing the Symphony Chorus, the Masterworks Chorale, the San Francisco Boys Chorus, and the San Francisco Girls Chorus. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Edo de Waart (born June 1, 1941) is a prominent Dutch orchestral conductor. ... Famiglia Artigiana Fratelli Ruffatti Famiglia Artigiana Fratelli Ruffatti (Ruffatti Brothers, Family of Artisans) is a manufacturer of pipe organs based in Padua, Italy. ... Michael Murray is a health psychologist based in Newfoundland. ... Joseph Jongen (December 14, 1873–July 12, 1953) was a Belgian organist, composer, and music educator. ... César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (December 10, 1822 – November 8, 1890), a composer, organist and music teacher of Belgian origin who lived in France, was one of the great figures in classical music in the second half of the 19th century. ... Masterworks Chorale is a community choral group based in San Mateo, California. ... // History The San Francisco Boys Chorus, founded in 1948 by Gaetano Merola and Madi Bacon as a resource for the San Francisco Opera, has grown into one of the Bay Area’s foremost musical organizations. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

Herbert Blomstedt

Herbert Blomstedt, the Swedish-American conductor, arrived in the fall of 1985. He had been offered the position immediately after guest conducting for two weeks in 1984, while he was music director of Staatskapelle Dresden. He further refined the orchestra, bringing greater precision and confidence, as well as more sensitivity, warmth and feeling, to the orchestra's performances. The orchestra also began its annual tours of Europe and Asia under Blosmtedt, and resumed syndicated weekly radio broadcasts. He also recognized the continuing shortcomings of Davies Symphony Hall's acoustics, helping push for a major renovation, completed in 1992, even contributing a substantial amount of money to the cause himself. He has remained Conductor Laureate of the orchestra, conducting several weeks of concerts each year. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Herbert Blomstedt (b. ... The Dresden Staatskapelle is an orchestra based in Dresden. ... Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall was built in 1980 to give the San Francisco Symphony a permanent home. ...

Michael Tilson Thomas

Michael Tilson Thomas became music director in 1995, coming from the London Symphony Orchestra. Thomas had guest conducted the orchestra as far back as 1974, and already had a good relationship with the musicians. Like Ozawa, Thomas ensured that the orchestra played more American music and this has been carried through to its recordings, for RCA/BMG and its own label. He has also focused on Russian music, particularly Stravinsky, as well as a prominent Mahler symphony cycle. A master communicator, Thomas excels at reaching out to audiences to enhance their experience of music through education. He has extended the orchestra's reputation as one of the world's best, further refining its balance and poise. His main personnel change was to lure LSO leader Alexander Barantschik to become SFS concertmaster. Thomas' great charisma has enabled the orchestra to be marketed as never before, with giant "MTT:SFS" posters displayed around San Francisco; his image has helped make the orchestra's Mahler recordings best-sellers among classical CDs. In an era of financial instability for many American orchestras, the San Francisco Symphony has thrived under Michael Tilson Thomas both financially and artistically. After more than a decade with the SFS, only Pierre Monteux's 17 years as music director is longer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... Alexander Barantschik, a Russian violinist, born in 1953, is currently concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony, as well as a frequent soloist and chamber musician. ... Concert-master. ...


In 1999, the symphony hit a new commercial high with the album S&M with metal group Metallica. The album reached number two on the The Billboard 200 selling 2.5 million units and earning platinum status five times over. The track "No Leaf Clover" was number one on the Mainstream Rock Charts, 18 on Modern Rock Charts and 74 on the Billboard Hot 100. The version of "The Call of Ktulu" featured on the album won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance. S&M is American heavy metal band Metallicas ninth album, recorded live with the San Francisco Symphony on April 21-22 of 1999. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... The Billboard 200 is a listing of the 200 highest selling music albums in the United States, published weekly in Billboard magazine. ... General Name, Symbol, Number platinum, Pt, 78 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 6, d Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 195. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into S&M (album). ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... This article is about the song by Metallica. ... The Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance has been awarded since 1980. ...


The San Francisco Symphony was the first to feature symphonic radio broadcasts in 1926, and in 2003 the Symphony was heard in syndicated radio broadcasts on over 300 radio stations. There were regular live, stereo broadcasts for many years on KKHI in San Francisco featuring music directors Josef Krips and Seiji Ozawa, including the first live transatlantic stereo satellite broadcast in 1973, originating in Paris. KKHIs AM radio transmitter building in 1976 KKHI was a classical music station in San Francisco, California operating on both AM (at 1550 kHz) and FM (at 95. ... Josef Alois Krips (born 8 April 1902 in Vienna, died 13 October 1974 in Geneva) was an Austrian conductor and violinist. ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ...


The orchestra makes regular tours of the United States, Europe and Asia. Its first tour was from March 16 to May 10, 1947, when Pierre Monteux conducted the musicians in fifty-seven concerts in fifty-three American cities. Josef Krips led them on a Japanese tour in 1968, in which they gave twelve concerts in seven cities. The May 15 to June 17, 1973, tour, saw Seiji Ozawa and Niklaus Wyss conduct the orchestra in 30 concerts in nineteen cities in Europe and the Soviet Union. They returned to Japan from June 4 to 19, 1975, with Ozawa and Wyss and played twelve concerts in eleven cities. Edo de Waart and David Ramadanoff led an American tour from October 20 to November 2, 1980, giving ten concerts in seven cities. There was another American tour from October 27 to November 12, 1983, again led by Edo de Waart, with thirteen concerts in eleven cities.


In 2004, the San Francisco Symphony launched Keeping Score – MTT On Music, a series of projects comprising audio-visual performances for DVD and broadcast on PBS's Great Performances, multimedia websites, and educational programs for schools. Keeping Score is the San Francisco Symphony’s five-year program designed to make classical music more accessible to people of all ages and musical backgrounds through television, the web, radio, DVDs, and in the classroom. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Great Performances was a television series devoted to the performing arts which ran on the US television station PBS from 1972. ...


The associated San Francisco Symphony Chorus was founded in 1973, and the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra was founded in 1981. The San Francisco Symphony Chorus is the resident chorus of the San Francisco Symphony (SFS). ...


Guests

Throughout its history the San Francisco Symphony has had some of the greatest conductors, musicians, and singers as guests. Many famous composers have also led the orchestra over the years. In 1915, Saint-Saens (1835-1921) conducted the orchestra at the Panama-Pacific International Expedition held that year in San Francisco's Marina District. In 1928, Maurice Ravel conducted some of his popular music. In June 1937 George Gershwin (1898-1937) conducted a suite from his opera Porgy and Bess, then was soloist in his Concerto in F with Pierre Monteux conducting. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was a regular guest conductor, appearing periodically from 1937 until 1967. Aaron Copland (1900-1990) conducted the orchestra in 1966. Other composers who have led the orchestra include Ernst von Dohnányi in 1927, Ottorino Respighi in 1929, Arnold Schoenberg in 1945, Darius Milhaud in 1949, Manuel Rosenthal in 1950, Leon Kirchner in 1960, Jean Martinon in 1970 and Howard Hanson. John Adams, composer-in-residence from 1979-1985, also frequently conducts his own works with the orchestra. Charles Camille Saint-Sa ns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ... Maurice Ravel. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... Concerto in F is a composition by George Gershwin for solo piano and orchestra which is closer in form to a traditional concerto than the earlier jazz-influenced Rhapsody in Blue. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... ErnÅ‘ Dohnányi, also known as Ernst von Dohnányi or Dohnányi ErnÅ‘ (July 27, 1877 – February 9, 1960) was a Hungarian conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Elsa and Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s Ottorino Respighi (Bologna, July 9, 1879 - Rome, April 18, 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist, pianist, violist and violinist. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (the anglicized form of Schönberg — Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he left Germany and re-converted to Judaism in 1933), (September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer. ... Darius Milhaud Darius Milhaud (IPA: ) (September 4, 1892 – June 22, 1974) was a French composer and teacher. ... Manuel Rosenthal (born June 18, 1904 in Paris, France, died June 5, 2003) was a French composer and conductor. ... Leon Kirchner (born January 24, 1919 in Brooklyn, NY) is an American composer of classical music. ... Jean Martinon (January 10, 1910–March 1, 1976) was a French conductor and composer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Alaska-based postminimalist composer, see John Luther Adams. ...


Besides visiting composers, some legendary conductors have led the orchestra, including Artur Rodzinski, Walter Damrosch, Sir Thomas Beecham, John Barbirolli, Andre Kostelanetz, Lorin Maazel, Leonard Bernstein, Guido Cantelli, Victor de Sabata, Dmitri Mitropoulos, Erich Leinsdorf, George Szell, Charles Munch, Paul Paray, Rafael Kubelik, Daniel Barenboim, Istvan Kertesz, Karl Richter, Antal Dorati, Leonard Slatkin, Andrew Davis, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Yevgeny Svetlanov, Simon Rattle, Kurt Masur, Neeme Jarvi, Kiril Kondrashin, Eugene Ormandy, George Solti, Michael Kamen, and Christopher Hogwood. Artur Rodzinski (January 1, 1892 - November 27, 1958) was a Polish conductor. ... Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... Thomas Beecham (April 29, 1879 - March 8, 1961) was a British conductor. ... Sir John (Giovanni Battista) Barbirolli (December 2, 1899 - July 29, 1970), was a British conductor and cellist who led the London Symphony Orchestra and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, among many others. ... Andre Kostelanetz (December 22, 1901 - January 13, 1980) was a popular orchestral music conductor and arranger, one of the pioneers of easy listening music. ... Lorin Varencove Maazel (born March 6, 1930) is a conductor, violinist and composer. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Guido Cantelli (April 27, 1920 - November 24, 1956) was a promising Italian orchestral conductor whose career was tragically cut short by his death at the age of 36 in an airplane crash in Paris, France. ... Vittorio (Victor) De Sabata (April 10, 1892 – December 11, 1967) was an Italian conductor and composer. ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... Paul Paray (born Le Tréport, May 24, 1886 - died Monte Carlo, October 10, 1979) was a French conductor, organist and composer. ... Rafael Jeroným Kubelík (June 29, 1914 – August 11, 1996) was a Czech conductor and composer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Istvan Kertesz (August 28, 1929 – April 16, 1973) was a Hungarian conductor. ... Karl Richter (October 15, 1926 – February 15, 1981) was a German conductor, organist, and harpsichordist. ... Antal Dor ti (April 9, 1906 - November 13, 1988) was a conductor and composer. ... Leonard Slatkin (born September 1, 1944) is an American conductor. ... Andrew Frank Davis (born February 2, 1944) is a British conductor. ... Nikolaus Harnoncourt (born Johann Nicolaus Graf de la Fontaine und dHarnoncourt-Unverzagt December 6, 1929 in Berlin) is an Austrian conductor, particularly known for his historically informed performances of music from the classical era and earlier. ... Evgeny Fyodorovich Svetlanov (September 6, 1928 - May 3, 2002) was a conductor and composer. ... Simon Rattle recording Porgy and Bess with the London Symphony Orchestra at Abbey Road in 1988, aged 33. ... Kurt Masur Conducting Mendelssohns Scottish Symphony Kurt Masur (born July 18, 1927) is a German conductor. ... Neeme Järvi (born June 7, 1937) is a Estonian-born conductor. ... Kiril Petrovich Kondrashin (March 6, 1914 – March 7, 1981) was a conductor. ... Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ... Sir Georg Solti (October 21, 1912 - September 5, 1997) was a well-known orchestral and operatic conductor, who was still actively engaged in performing right up until his death. ... Michael Kamen (April 15, 1948 – November 18, 2003) was an American composer (especially of film scores), orchestral arranger, orchestral conductor, song writer, and session musician. ... Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood CBE (born 10 September 1941) is an English conductor, harpsichordist, writer and scholar of music. ...


Some of the many soloists who have appeared with the orchestra include violinists Jascha Heifetz, Fritz Kreisler, Yehudi Menuhin, Midori, Itzhak Perlman, Isaac Stern and Efrem Zimbalist; and pianists Vladimir de Pachmann, Peter Serkin, Rudolf Serkin, and Andre Watts. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austria-born American violinist and composer; one of the most famous violinists of his day. ... Yehudi Menuhin, Baron Menuhin, OM, KBE (April 22, 1916 – March 12, 1999) was an American violinist and conductor who spent most of his performing career in the United Kingdom. ... Midori (緑) has several meanings: It is the Japanese word for the color green. It is also a common Japanese female personal name. ... Itzhak Perlman playing during the entertainment portion of the White House State Dinner in honor on Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on May 7, 2007 Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli-American virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... Isaac Stern (July 21, 1920 – September 22, 2001) is widely considered one of the finest violin virtuosi of the twentieth century. ... Efrem Zimbalist, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Efrem Zimbalist (9/21 April 1889 - February 22, 1985) was one of the worlds most prominent concert violinists, as well as a composer, teacher and conductor. ... Vladimir von Pachmann, sometimes seen as von Pachmann or Pachman (27 July 1848 - 6 January 1933) was a virtuoso pianist especially noted for performing the works of Chopin, and also for his unusual on-stage style. ... Peter Serkin (born July 24, 1947) is a distinguished American pianist. ... Rudolf Serkin (March 28, 1903 – May 8, 1991) was an Austrian pianist. ... Andr Watts is a classical pianist. ...


Concert Halls

The SFS gave its first performance in December 1911 in the Cort Theater at 64 Ellis Street. The concerts moved to the Curran Theater at 445 Geary Street in 1918, then to the Tivoli Theater at 75 Eddy Street in 1921-22. The musicians returned to the Curran Theater from 1922 to 1931, then back to the Tivoli Theater from 1931 to 1932. Finally, on November 11, 1932, the San Francisco Symphony moved to the brand new War Memorial Opera House at 301 Van Ness Avenue, where most of the concerts were given until June 1980. The pops concerts were usually given in the huge Civic Auditorium. The final concert in the historic opera house, a Beethoven program conducted by Leonard Slatkin, was in June 1980. The orchestra now plays in Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall at Grove Street and Van Ness Avenue, which opened in September 1980 with a gala concert conducted by Edo de Waart, televised live on PBS and hosted by violinist/conductor Yehudi Menuhin. Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Leonard Slatkin (born September 1, 1944) is an American conductor. ... Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall was built in 1980 to give the San Francisco Symphony a permanent home. ... Edo de Waart (born June 1, 1941) is a prominent Dutch orchestral conductor. ... Yehudi Menuhin, Baron Menuhin, OM, KBE (April 22, 1916 – March 12, 1999) was an American violinist and conductor who spent most of his performing career in the United Kingdom. ...


Honors

The SFS has won eleven awards from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers for programming of new music and commitment to American music. In 2001, the San Francisco Symphony gave the world premiere of Henry Brant’s Ice Field, which later won that year’s Pulitzer Prize for Music.[1] Henry Brant (born September 15, 1913) is a highly significant California-based composer of art music based on spatialization and limited aleatory. ...


Recordings

The orchestra has a long history of recordings, most notably those made with Pierre Monteux for RCA Victor, Herbert Blomstedt for Decca, and Michael Tilson Thomas for BMG and the orchestra's own label, SFS Media. Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Herbert Blomstedt (b. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ...


Its recorded legacy began in early 1925 with acoustical recordings for the Victor Talking Machine of music by Auber and Richard Wagner, conducted by Alfred Hertz. The very first recording, of Auber's overture to Fra Diavolo was made on January 19, 1925. They soon switched to electrical recordings with Victor, conducted by Hertz, which continued until 1930. These recordings were produced by Victor's Oakland plant, which had opened in 1924. It is unclear where the various recordings were made, although it is apparent that some were made in a large auditorium. One early complete set was of the ballet music from Le Cid by Jules Massenet. During the 1925-30 recordings, Hertz also conducted music by Beethoven, Brahms, Delibes, Glazunov, Gounod, Kreisler, Liszt, Alexandre Luigini, Mendelssohn, Moszkowski, Rimsky Korsakov, Schubert and Weber. All of these recordings have only been issued on 78 rpm discs and are prized by collectors for their remarkable fidelity and solid performances. The Victor Talking Machine Company (1901 - 1929) was a United States corporation, the leading American producer of phonographs and phonograph records and one of the leading phonograph companies in the world at the time. ... Daniel François Esprit Auber (January 29, 1782 _ May 13, 1871), French composer, the son of a Paris print-seller, was born in Caen in Normandy. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Alfred Hertz was featured on the cover of Time magazine, October 31 1927 Alfred Hertz (born July 15, 1872 in Frankfurt, died April 17, 1942 in San Francisco, was a German-American conductor. ... Fra Diavolo (lit. ... Le Cid is a tragicomedy written by Pierre Corneille and published in 1636. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Delibes is the last name of some famous people: Leo Delibes (1836-1891), a French composer Miguel Delibes (1920- ), a Spanish Writer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (or Glazounov) (August 10, 1865 – March 21, 1936) was a Russian composer, as well as an influential music teacher. ... Categories: Stub | 1818 births | 1893 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | French musicians ... Fritz Kreisler (circa 1938) Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austrian (later American) violinist and composer, one of the most famous violinists of his day. ... Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ... Alexandre Clement Leon Joseph Luigini was born in Lyon in 1850, his grand-parents having moved there from Modena, Italy when his grandfather took up the post of trumpeter with the orchestra of the Grand-Theatre. ... Mendelssohn (or Mendelsohn) can refer to several subjects. ... Maurycy Moszkowski (in Polish), or Moritz Moszkowski (in German), (August 23, 1854 Breslau - March 4, 1925 Paris) was a Polish composer, pianist and teacher. ... Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: Никола́й Андре́евич Ри́мский-Ко́рсаков), also Nikolai, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 18, 1844 &#8211... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... Weber is a surname of German origin, derived from the noun meaning weaver. The German pronunciation is IPA: , while in English it is more likely to be pronounced IPA: or IPA: . In some cases, following migration to English-speaking countries, it has been anglicised to the English surname Webber or...


Monteux's recordings were made in the War Memorial Opera House from 1941 to 1952, initially using a revolutionary sound film process and then magnetic tape; there was also a stereo session for RCA with Monteux in January 1960. Monteux's first recording with the orchestra was of Scheherazade by Rimsky Korsakov; his last was of Siegfried Idyll by Wagner and Death and Transfiguration by Richard Strauss. The recordings remain quite impressive and some have appeared on LPs and compact discs, especially in France. Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: Никола́й Андре́евич Ри́мский-Ко́рсаков), also Nikolai, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 18, 1844 &#8211... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ...


Enrique Jordá made several stereo recordings for RCA in 1957 and 1958, as well as an album for CRI in 1962. Jorda's recording of Rachmaninoff's second piano concerto, with pianist Alexander Brailowsky was in the catalogue for many years, despite major editing. Enrique Jordá (born San Sebastian, Spain, 1911, died Brussels, Belgium, 1996) was a Spanish-American conductor. ... Poster for 1942 concert tour of North and South America Alexander Brailowsky (16 February 1896 - 25 April 1976) was a Russian pianist who specialized in the works of Frédéric Chopin. ...


Commercial recordings resumed in June 1972 with Seiji Ozawa for Deutsche Grammophon in the Flint Center at De Anza College in Cupertino, California. In May 1975 Ozawa recorded Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 in E-flat and Dvorak's Carnival Overture and Symphony No. 9 in E Minor for Philips. Recording of the SFS under the direction of Edo de Waart, including digital recordings made in Davies Symphony Hall were also published by Philips. One of de Waart's sets of digital recordings was devoted to the four piano concertos of Sergei Rachmaninoff, featuring pianist Zoltan Kocsis. Flint Center, the main auditorium De Anza College is a 112 acre (453,000 m²) community college located in Cupertino, California. ... Cali Mill Plaza (Cupertino City Center) is located on the intersection of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards where the village of Westwood was established. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Dvořák is a common Czech surname (feminine form is Dvořáková). Spelling without diacritics is Dvorak. ... Portrait of Sergei Rachmaninoff (1925) by Konstantin Somov This article is about the composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Zoltán Kocsis (born 1952 Budapest, Hungary) is a pianist, conductor, and composer. ...


Soon after the arrival of Herbert Blomstedt, the SFS signed contracts with the British label Decca resulting in 29 CDs release under the London label. Several of recordings won international awards. Among their recording projects were the complete symphonies of Nielsen and Sibelius, choral works of Brahms, and orchestral works of Richard Strauss and Hindemith. The recordings helped to build the orchestra's worldwide reputation as one of the best in the United States. It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... London Records is a record label headquartered in the United Kingdom, originally marketing records in the United States, Canada and Latin America from 1947 through the 1980s. ... Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... Johan Julius Christian Jean / Janne Sibelius ( ; December 8, 1865 – September 20, 1957) was a Finnish composer of classical music and one of the most notable composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ...


The orchestra returned to RCA Victor when Michael Tilson Thomas became music director. Its first recording of the new contract was extended excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. There were special tributes to two American composers, Charles Ives and Aaron Copland. With the RCA label decision to no longer produce new classical recordings, the SFS created its own label, SFS Media and production of its ongoing Mahler symphony cycle. The San Francisco Symphony, with Thomas, have produced several Grammy Award-winning recordings. Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ...


Music directors

Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... Herbert Blomstedt (b. ... Edo de Waart (born June 1, 1941) is a prominent Dutch orchestral conductor. ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Josef Alois Krips (born 8 April 1902 in Vienna, died 13 October 1974 in Geneva) was an Austrian conductor and violinist. ... Enrique Jordá (born San Sebastian, Spain, 1911, died Brussels, Belgium, 1996) was a Spanish-American conductor. ... Pierre Monteux (April 4, 1875 – July 1, 1964) was an orchestra conductor. ... Basil Cameron (born August 18, 1884 in Reading, Berkshire, died June 26, 1975 in Leominster) was an English conductor. ... Issay Dobrowen (1891-1953) was a pianist, composer and conductor, originally from Russia. ... Alfred Hertz was featured on the cover of Time magazine, October 31 1927 Alfred Hertz (born July 15, 1872 in Frankfurt, died April 17, 1942 in San Francisco, was a German-American conductor. ... Henry Hadley (born 20 December 1871, Somerville, Massachusetts, died 6 September 1937, New York City) was an American composer and conductor. ...

Recognition

Flag of Belgium Belgium Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ...


Caecilia Prize

Flag of France France See also: other events of 1985 Musical groups established in 1985 Record labels established in 1985 list of years in music 1980s in music // January 28 - Various artists, including Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, Billy Joel, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Perry, Kenny Loggins, Willie Nelson, Lionel Richie, Smokey Robinson, Kenny... Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


Grand Prix du Disque The Grand Prix du Disque is the premier French award for musical recordings. ...

Ordre des Arts et des Lettres See also: other events of 1985 Musical groups established in 1985 Record labels established in 1985 list of years in music 1980s in music // January 28 - Various artists, including Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, Billy Joel, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Perry, Kenny Loggins, Willie Nelson, Lionel Richie, Smokey Robinson, Kenny... Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Literature) is an Order of France, established on May 2, 1957 by the Minister of Culture, and confirmed as part of lOrdre National du Mérite by President Charles de Gaulle in 1963. ...

Flag of Germany Germany Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ...


Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik

Flag of Japan Japan “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ...


Japan Record Academy Award

Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom Edvard Grieg Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... Peer Gynt is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...


Gramophone Award - Best Orchestral The Gramophone Awards are one of the most significant honours bestowed on the classical record industry, often referred to as the Oscars for classical music. ...

Flag of the United States United States Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... The Symphony No. ... Carl Nielsens Symphony No. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


Emmy Award for Outstanding Classical Music-Dance Program An Emmy Award. ...

  • 2002 Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber Of Fleet Street

Grammy Award for Best Classical Album The 54th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were held Sunday, September 22, 2002. ... The Grammy Award for Best Classical Album has been awarded since 1962. ...

Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... The 46th Grammy Awards were held on the February 8, 2004. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... Kindertotenlieder (Songs on the Death of Children) is a song cycle for voice and orchestra by Gustav Mahler. ... The 42nd Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2000. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... The Firebird (French: LOiseau de feu; Russian: Жар-птица, Žar-ptica) is a 1910 ballet by Igor Stravinsky. ... The Rite of Spring, commonly referred to by its original French title, Le Sacre du printemps (Russian: Весна священная, Vesna svjaščennaja) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky, which was first performed in 1913. ... The Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance has been awarded since 1961. ...

Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Classical The 38th Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1996. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ein deutsches Requiem For the short story by Jorge Luis Borges, see Ein deutsches Requiem (short story). ... The 38th Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1996. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895 – March 29, 1982) was a 20th-century German composer, most famous for Carmina Burana (1937). ... This article is about Carl Orffs musical composition based on the medieval collection of poems. ... The Grammy Award for Best Engineered Recording, Non-Classical has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance The 42nd Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2000. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... The Firebird (French: LOiseau de feu; Russian: Жар-птица, Žar-ptica) is a 1910 ballet by Igor Stravinsky. ... The Rite of Spring, commonly referred to by its original French title, Le Sacre du printemps (Russian: Весна священная, Vesna svjaščennaja) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky, which was first performed in 1913. ... The 38th Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1996. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... The Concerto for Orchestra Sz. ... The Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... The 45th Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2003. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... The 42nd Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2000. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... The Firebird (French: LOiseau de feu; Russian: Жар-птица, Žar-ptica) is a 1910 ballet by Igor Stravinsky. ... The Rite of Spring, commonly referred to by its original French title, Le Sacre du printemps (Russian: Весна священная, Vesna svjaščennaja) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky, which was first performed in 1913. ... The 38th Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1996. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Серге́й Серге́евич Проко́фьев) (April 271, 1891 – March 5, 1953) was one of the Soviet Unions greatest composers. ... Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet. ... The Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance has been awarded since 1980. ...

The 43rd Grammy Awards were held on February 21, 2001. ... This article is about the song by Metallica. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ...

References

  1. ^ "San Francisco Symphony History Overview", San Francisco Symphony, August 2003. Retrieved on 2007-04-04. 
  • Schneider, David (1983). The San Francisco Symphony: Music, Maestros, and Musicians. Novato, CA: Presidio Press. ISBN 089141181X. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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