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Encyclopedia > San Francisco Board of Supervisors
San Francisco skyline.

The City and County of San Francisco (estimated population 799,263) is the fourth-largest city in the state of California, United States, in terms of population. It is a consolidated city-county situated at the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula that forms San Francisco Bay. The city-county also includes several islands in the bay and the Farallon Islands 27 miles offshore in the Pacific Ocean. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A city is an urban area, differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... In United States local government, a consolidated city-county is a city and county that have a merged government, and is considered both a city and a county under the laws of the State. ... The San Francisco peninsula separates the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate The San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary in which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... The Farallon Islands are a group of islands and rocks found in the Gulf of the Farallons outside of San Franciscos Golden Gate. ...


The city is the focal point of the San Francisco Bay Area metropolitan area, whose total population is about 7 million. U.S. census data show that San Francisco has the highest population density of any city aside from New York City. USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ... City nickname: The Big Apple Location in the state of New York Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg Area  - Land  - Water 1,214. ...

Golden Gate Bridge

The first Europeans to settle in San Francisco were the Spanish, in 1776. The city grew rapidly due to the California gold rush starting in 1848. Download high resolution version (1142x687, 88 KB)Golden Gate Bridge Photograph taken 19 April 2002 by Peter Craig Photo placed in the public domain by photographer. ... Download high resolution version (1142x687, 88 KB)Golden Gate Bridge Photograph taken 19 April 2002 by Peter Craig Photo placed in the public domain by photographer. ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Gold rush handbill The California Gold Rush was a period in American history marked by mass hysteria concerning a gold discovery in Northern California. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The city was devastated by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, but was rebuilt quickly. The phoenix on the city's flag represents San Francisco's "rebirth" from the ashes of the fire that resulted from the quake. Long enjoying a bohemian reputation, the city became a counterculture magnet in the second half of the 20th century. It was a center of the dot-com boom at the end of the century. The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was a major earthquake at San Francisco, California on the early morning of Wednesday, April 18, 1906. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... Bohemians are inhabitants of Bohemia, Czech Republic. ... During the 1960s the term underground acquired a new meaning in that it referred to members of the so-called counterculture, i. ... Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ...

San Francisco, California
City flag City seal
City nickname: "The City by the Bay"

Location in the state of California
County City and County of San Francisco, California
Area
 - Total
 - Water

600.7 km² (231.9 mi²)
479.7 km² (185.2 mi²) 79.86%
Population


 - Total (2000) San Francisco Flag. ... Seal of the City of San Francisco This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... A flag is a piece of cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually intended for signaling or identification. ... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Nick is short for Nicholas). ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


 - Density


799,263 Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ...


6,423.2/km^2
Time zone Pacific: UTC-8

Latitude
Longitude
Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ...

37°46′ N 122°26′ W (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=37_46_N_122_26_W_)

Widely recognized landmarks include the San Francisco cable car system, the Golden Gate Bridge and the Transamerica Pyramid. A San Francisco cable car The San Francisco cable car system is the worlds last permanently operational manually operated cable car system, and is now an icon of the city of San Francisco in California. ... View to the northwest, towards the Marin headlands The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... The Transamerica Pyramid. ...



Contents

History

European visitors to the Bay Area were preceded 10,000 to 20,000 years earlier by Native Americans. When Europeans arrived, they found the area inhabited by the Yelamu tribe, belonging to a linguistic grouping later called the Ohlone (a Miwok Indian word meaning "western people") living in the coastal area between Point Sur and the San Francisco Bay. World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... The Ohlone were an ethnic group whose members lived in what is now the San Francisco Bay Area of California until after the European discovery and settling of this area. ... Miwok—also spelled Miwuk or Me-Wuk—refers to native Californians who lived in what is now Northern California. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate The San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary in which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ...


European discovery and exploration of the San Francisco Bay Area began in 1542 and culminated with the mapping of the bay in 1775. A Spanish party led by Juan Bautista de Anza arrived on March 28, 1776 and established the sites for the Presidio of San Francisco and Mission San Francisco de Asis (named for Saint Francis of Assisi and now popularly known as "Mission Dolores"). The area first began to develop as a city under the name of Yerba Buena in 1822, when what is now the downtown area was first settled by William Richardson, an English whaler. USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Spanish colonization of the Americas began with the arrival in the Americas of Christopher Columbus in 1492. ... Juan Bautista de Anza (July 1736 - December 19, 1788) was a Novo-Spanish explorer working for the Spanish empire. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... This article is about the year 1776. ... The Presidio of San Francisco is a park on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in the City and County of San Francisco. ... Mission Basilica San Francisco de Asís Mission Basilica San Francisco de Asís, also known as Mission Dolores, was founded on October 9, 1776. ... Saint Francis of Assisi (born in Assisi, Italy, 1181; died there on October 4, 1226) founded the Franciscan Order or Friars Minor. He is the patron saint of animals, merchants, Catholic action and the environment. ... Binomial nomenclature Clinopodium douglasii (Benth. ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion...


Yerba Buena remained a small town until the Mexican-American War broke out and a naval force under Commodore John D. Sloat took it in 1846 in the name of the United States. It was then renamed "San Francisco" on 30 January 1847. The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Commodore John D. Sloat John Drake Sloat (July 6, 1781 - November 28, 1867) was a commodore in the United States Navy, and in 1846 claimed California for the United States. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Situated at the tip of a windswept peninsula without water or firewood, San Francisco lacked most of the basic facilities for a nineteenth century settlement. These natural disadvantages forced the town's residents to bring water, fuel and food to the site. The first of many environmental transformations was the city's reliance on filled marshlands for real estate. Much of the present downtown is built over the former Yerba Buena Cove, granted to the city by military governor Stephen Watts Kearny in 1847.

San Francisco in 1855.

The California gold rush starting in 1848 led to a large growth in population, including considerable immigration. Between January 1848 and December 1849, the population of San Francisco increased from 1,000 to 25,000. The Chinatown district of the city is still one of the largest in the country and has probably the largest concentration of Chinese in any single city outside of China. Many businesses started at that time to service the growing population are still present today, notably Levi Strauss & Co. clothing, Ghirardelli chocolate, and Wells Fargo bank. Download high resolution version (1486x1032, 381 KB)San Francisco. ... Download high resolution version (1486x1032, 381 KB)San Francisco. ... Gold rush handbill The California Gold Rush was a period in American history marked by mass hysteria concerning a gold discovery in Northern California. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The second-largest Chinatown in North America is in San Francisco, California, where signs, storefronts, proprietors, and even lamp posts bring the culture of China to the United States. ... Levi Strauss & Co. ... The Ghirardelli Chocolate Company is a United States division of Swiss candy-maker Lindt & Sprüngli. ... Chocolate, ranging from dark to light, can be molded and decorated like these chickens with ribbons. ... Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified financial services company in the United States, with consumer finance subsidiaries doing business in Canada, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Caribbean. ...


Like many mining towns, the political situation in early San Francisco was chaotic. This was exacerbated by squabbling in the United States Senate, where the Compromise of 1850 was igniting a fierce fight over slavery. Disgusted by increasing corruption and crime, a group of San Franciscans formed a Committee of Vigilance in 1851, and again in 1856. This military government exiled many citizens, executed a few, and forced several elected officials to resign. The Committee of Vigilance relinquished power both times after it decided the city had been 'cleaned up'. Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or...


San Francisco became the USA's largest city west of the Mississippi River. Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin Lake Itasca Mouth Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ...

Market Street, early 20th century

San Francisco County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. All of the county not in the city limits was split off to form San Mateo County in 1856. Market Street, San Francisco, from postcard, 1st decade of 20th century. ... Market Street, San Francisco, from postcard, 1st decade of 20th century. ... San Mateo County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In autumn of 1855, a ship bearing refugees from an ongoing cholera epidemic in the far east (authorities disagree as to whether this was the S.S. Sam or the S.S. Carolina) docked in San Francisco. As the city's rapid gold-rush area population growth had significantly outstripped the development of infrastructure, including sanitation, a serious cholera epidemic quickly broke out. The responsibility for caring for the indigent sick had previously rested on the state, but faced with the San Francisco cholera epidemic, the state legislature devolved this responsibility to the counties, setting the precedent for California's system of county hospitals for the poor still in effect today. The Sisters of Mercy were contracted to run San Francisco's first county hospital at the height of the cholera epidemic, and in 1857, the order opened its own charity hospital, Mercy Hospital of San Francisco, which is still in operation today at its original location on Stanyan Street. distribution of cholera Cholera (also called Asiatic cholera) is an infectious disease of the gastrointestinal tract caused by the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. ... An epidemic is generally a widespread disease that affects many individuals in a population. ... Sanitation is a term for the hygienic disposal or recycling of waste materials, particularly human excrement. ... For the gothic rock band of this name, see The Sisters of Mercy. ...


Founded in 1855, The University of San Francisco was one of the first universities in the West. The University will celebrate its 150th anniversary in 2005. Located near Turk and Masonic, the campus can be seen from miles around. The University of San Francisco (often abbreviated USF) is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ...


The most colorful figure of late 19th century San Francisco was "Emperor" Joshua A. Norton. Joshua A. Norton, Emperor Norton I Joshua Abraham Norton (January 17, 1811 – January 8, 1880), also known as His Imperial Majesty Emperor Norton I, was a celebrated citizen of San Francisco who famously proclaimed himself Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico in 1859. ...


In 1900, a ship from China brought with it rats infected with bubonic plague. Mistakenly believing that interred corpses contributed to the transmission of plague, and possibly also motivated by the opportunity for profitable land speculation, city leaders banned all cemeteries within the city. Burials moved to the undeveloped area just south of the city limit, now the town of Colma, California. A fifteen-block section of Chinatown was quarantined while city leaders squabbled over the proper course to take, but the outbreak was finally eradicated by 1905. Bubonic plague is an infectious disease that is believed to have caused several epidemics or pandemics throughout history. ... Colma is a small town in San Mateo County, California, at the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula next to Daly City and South San Francisco. ...


On April 18, 1906, a devastating earthquake resulted from the rupture of over 270 miles of the San Andreas Fault, from San Juan Bautista to Eureka, centered immediately offshore of San Francisco. The quake is estimated by modern scientists to have reached 8.25 on the Richter scale. Water mains ruptured throughout San Francisco, and the fires that followed burned out of control for days, destroying the vast majority of buildings in the city. The official reported death toll was 478, but most historians agree the true tally was much higher, probably over 3000. Many residents were trapped between the water on three sides and the approaching fire, and a mass evacuation similar to that of the later Battle of Dunkirk to safety across the Bay saved thousands. With the centennial of the disaster approaching, a city supervisor sponsored a resolution to amend the death toll, noting "there is evidence to show the number was suppressed for political reasons" (namely that the city's reputation would have suffered). [1] (http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/news/10737701.htm) See also: 1906 San Francisco earthquake April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... View of the San Andreas Fault in central California The San Andreas Fault is a geological fault, known as a right-lateral strike-slip fault, that spans a length of roughly 800 miles (1287 kilometers) through California. ... San Juan Bautista has several meanings: The Spanish translation of John the Baptist. ... EUREKA is a research and development funding and coordination organization of the European Union founded in 1985. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Battle of Dunkirk Conflict World War II Date May 26, 1940 – June 4, 1940 Place Dunkirk, France Result German victory, Allied evacuation The Battle of Dunkirk (in French: Dunkerque, and in Britain normally referred to simply as Dunkirk) was a major battle during World War II which lasted from around... The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was a major earthquake at San Francisco, California on the early morning of Wednesday, April 18, 1906. ...


In 1912, this time with no excuse other than the rising value of real estate, all remaining cemeteries in the city were evicted to south of the city limit, where in the modern-day town of Colma the dead now outnumber the living more than ten-thousand to one. Unwilling to evict the remains of San Francisco's most prominent founding citizens, however, the above-ground Columbarium of San Francisco was allowed to remain, whose 30,000 deceased residents are the only permitted within the city to this day. 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... The Columbarium of San Francisco is an above-ground burial site built in 1897 by architect Bernard J. Cahill. ...

In 1915, the city hosted the Panama-Pacific Exposition, officially to celebrate the opening of the Panama Canal, but also as a showcase of the vibrant completely rebuilt city less than a decade after the Earthquake. On July 22, 1916 a bomb exploded on Market Street during a Preparedness Day parade, killing 10 and injuring 40. Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 869 KB)Golden Gate Bridge, Spanning mouth of San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA General view, looking North, showing the sea side of the structure 1984 19MB TIFF file, cropped, adjusted, scaled, and converted to JPEG Photographer Jet Lowe Creator United States... Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 869 KB)Golden Gate Bridge, Spanning mouth of San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA General view, looking North, showing the sea side of the structure 1984 19MB TIFF file, cropped, adjusted, scaled, and converted to JPEG Photographer Jet Lowe Creator United States... View to the northwest, towards the Marin headlands The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... Categories: Stub | Worlds Fairs | California history | San Francisco history ... Panama Canal The Panama Canal is a large canal, 82 kilometres (51 miles) long, that cuts through the isthmus of Panama, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ...


The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge was opened in 1936 and the Golden Gate Bridge in 1937. During World War II, San Francisco was the major mainland supply point and port of embarkation for the war in the Pacific. The Bay Bridge, with the skyline of San Francisco in the background. ... View to the northwest, towards the Marin headlands The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The United Nations Charter was also drafted in San Francisco in 1945. Six years later in 1951, the Treaty of San Francisco which established peaceful relations with Japan, was also drafted there. The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru of Japan, gave a speech on Reconciliation and rapport (和解と信頼) in 1951 at San Francisco Peace conference. ...


During the early 1950s, Caltrans commenced an aggressive freeway construction program in the Bay Area. However, Caltrans soon encountered strong resistance in San Francisco, for the city's high population density meant that virtually any right-of-way would displace a large number of people. Caltrans tried to minimize displacement (and its land acquisition costs) by building double-decker freeways, but the crude state of civil engineering at that time resulted in construction of some embarrassingly ugly freeways which ultimately turned out to be seismically unsafe. In 1959, the Board of Supervisors voted to halt construction of any more freeways in the city, an event known as the Freeway Revolt. Although some minor modifications have been allowed to the ends of existing freeways, the city's anti-freeway policy has remained in place ever since. In 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake destroyed the Embarcadero Freeway and portions of the so-called Central Freeway. Over the course of several referenda, San Francisco's residents elected not to rebuild either structure. The neighborhoods once covered by these freeways have been rebuilt, and the restoration of the Embarcadero, San Francisco's historic bay waterfront, as a public space has been especially successful. Caltrans logo The soaring ramps in the stack interchanges favored by Caltrans often provide stunning views. ... Missing image A typical rural freeway (Interstate 5 in the Central Valley of California). ... In modern usage, civil engineering is a broad field of engineering that deals with the planning, construction, and maintenance of fixed structures as they related to earth, water, or civilization and their processes. ... Late 1940s San Francisco Planning Department Freeway Plan The Freeway Revolt is the name given to public opposition against building freeways through San Francisco, California in the 1950s. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989 in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 pm local time and measured 7. ... Section of the Embarcadero Freeway in front of the Ferry Building during demolition The Embarcadero Freeway was a freeway in San Francisco. ...


In the 1950s San Francisco hired Harvard graduate Justin Herman to head the redevelopment agency for the city and county. Justin Herman began an aggressive campaign to renew blighted areas of the city. Enacting eminent domain whenever necessary, he set upon a plan to tear down huge areas of the city and replace them with modern construction. Critics accused Herman of racism for what was perceived as attempts to create segregation and displacement of African-Americans. Many African-Americans were forced to move from their homes near the Fillmore jazz district to newly constructed projects such as Hunter's Point or even to cities such as Oakland. He began levelling entire areas in San Francisco's Western Addition and Japantown neighborhoods. His planning led to the creation of Embarcadero Center, the Embarcadero Freeway, Japantown, the Geary Street superblocks, and Yerba Buena Gardens. In law, eminent domain is the power of the state to appropriate private property for its own use without the owners consent. ... Section of the Embarcadero Freeway in front of the Ferry Building during demolition The Embarcadero Freeway was a freeway in San Francisco. ... Japantown (also known as Nihonmachi (ja: 日本町), Little Osaka, and J Town) comprises about six square city blocks in the Western Addition in San Francisco. ... Yerba Buena Gardens is the park between Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (www. ...


San Francisco has often been a magnet for America's counterculture. During the 1950s, City Lights Bookstore in the North Beach neighborhood was an important publisher of Beat Generation literature. Some of the story of the evolving arts scene of the 1950s is told in the article San Francisco Renaissance. During the latter half of the following decade, the 1960s, San Francisco was the center of hippie culture. Thousands of young people poured into the Haight-Ashbury district of the city during 1967, which was known as the Summer of Love. At this time, the "San Francisco sound" emerged as an influential force in rock music, with such acts as the Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence, blurring the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developing the lyrical content of rock. In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream. ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... The City Lights Bookstore, in the North Beach section of San Francisco, is an independent bookstore specializing in poetry. ... Beatnik redirects here. ... The term San Francisco Renaissance is used as a global designation for a range of poetic activity centred around that city and which brought it to prominence as a hub of the American poetic avant-garde. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Hippie (or sometimes hippy) is a term originally used to describe some of the rebellious youth of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Summer of Love was a phrase given to the summer of 1967 to try to describe (personify) the feeling of being in San Francisco that summer, when the hippie movement came to full fruition. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... Jerry Garcia later in life Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ...


Another peculiar development is that the Church Of Satan was founded and made its headquarters in San Francisco in 1966. The Church of Satan is a religious organization that promotes Satanism as strictly defined by The Satanic Bible, written in 1969 by Anton Szandor LaVey. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


During the 1980s and 1990s San Francisco became a major focal point in the North American--and international-- punk and rave scene. On the rave scene, the city was the first to host the Love Parade outside its birthplace of Berlin, Germany in 2004. Events and trends Technology The World Wide Web was born at CERN Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft... This article is about a form of party. ... Alternate meaning: The Love Parade, a 1929 film. ... Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The late 1960s brought in a new wave of lesbians and gays who were more radical and less mainstream and who had flocked to San Francisco not only for its gay-friendly reputation, but for its reputation as a radical, left-wing epicenter. These lesbians and gays were the prime movers of Gay Liberation and often lived communally, buying (like their straight counterparts) decrepit Victorians in the Haight and fixing them up. When drugs and violence began to become a serious problem in the Haight, many lesbians and gays simply moved "over the hill", to the Castro. In the 1970s, large numbers of gay people moved to San Francisco's Castro district, which previous to their arrival, had been abandoned by Irish-Americans who moved en masse to the more affluent and culturally homogenous suburbs. Because of the rise of this new population, as well as the overall change in ethnic and cultural demographics, tensions arose in the city, and these tensions led to tragedy in 1978 when a conservative member of the Board of Supervisors and a former cop, Dan White, murdered San Francisco's first openly gay elected official, Supervisor Harvey Milk and the city's mayor George Moscone on November 27 (see "Twinkie Defense"). Today, the gay population of the city is estimated to be at about 15%, and gays remain an important force in the city's politics. San Francisco has more gays and lesbians than any other US city. Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... Gay, in addition to meaning happy, also means, simplistically, preferring the same sex in current usage, though to tie down the word to a specific cultural meaning might be to misrespresent a huge community of individuals who find themselves described by the word gay. The term gay, or lesbian for... Many rainbow flags, a gay symbol of pride, are displayed in The Castro The Castro is: a street in San Francisco, which is best known for being the heart of San Franciscos gay community. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Dan White ( September 2, 1946 - October 21, 1985) was the former city supervisor of San Francisco who assassinated Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone on November 27, 1978 at City Hall. ... Harvey Milk Harvey Milk (May 22, 1930 - November 27, 1978) an American politician and gay rights activist, was the first openly gay city supervisor of San Francisco, California. ... George Richard Moscone (November 24, 1929 - November 27, 1978) was Mayor of San Francisco from 1976 to his assassination in 1978. ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... In jurisprudence, a Twinkie defense is a criminal defendants claim that some unusual factor entered into the causes or motives of the alleged crime. ...


During the 1980s, homeless people began appearing in large numbers in the city, the result of factors that were affecting the country at large, combined with San Francisco's attractive environment and generous welfare policies, economic and social changes, and the availability of addictive drugs are often cited as reasons for the growth of the problem. Mayor Art Agnos (1988-92) was the first to attack the problem, and not the last; it is a top issue for San Franciscans even today. Agnos allowed the homeless to camp in the Civic Center park, which led to its title of "Camp Agnos." The failure of this lenient policy led to his being replaced by Frank Jordan in 1992. Jordan launched the "MATRIX" program the next year, which aimed to displace the homeless through aggressive police action. And it did displace them - to the rest of the city. His successor, Willie Brown, was able to largely ignore the problem, riding on the strong economy into a second term. Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... A homeless man pushes a cart down the street. ... Economics (in Greek Οικονομικά) derives from the Greek word Eco(οίκω=house) and nemo(νέμω=distribute) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources through measurable variables. ... The adjective social implies that the verb or noun to which it is applied is somehow more communicative, cooperative, and moderated by contact with human beings, than if it were omitted. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... Arthur Christ Agnos (often called Art) (born 1938) is a U.S. political figure. ... Francis M. Frank Jordan (born 1935) is a U.S. politician. ... Willie Lewis Brown, Jr. ...


On October 17, 1989, an earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter magnitude scale struck on the San Andreas Fault near Loma Prieta Peak in the Santa Cruz mountains, approximately 70 miles south of San Francisco, during game 3 of the 1989 World Series. The quake severely damaged many of the city's freeway's including the Embarcadero Freeway and the Central Freeway. The damage to these freeways was so extensive, that they were eventually demolished. The quake also caused extensive damage in the Marina District and the South of Market. Known in most of the United States as the "World Series Quake", but in California and by seismologists as the Loma Prieta earthquake, it caused significant destruction and loss of life throughout the greater bay area. October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... View of the San Andreas Fault in central California The San Andreas Fault is a geological fault, known as a right-lateral strike-slip fault, that spans a length of roughly 800 miles (1287 kilometers) through California. ... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in North America, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... Section of the Embarcadero Freeway in front of the Ferry Building during demolition The Embarcadero Freeway was a freeway in San Francisco. ... The Marina district is an affluent, picturesque neighborhood of San Francisco, California. ... South of Market or SOMA is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989 in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 pm local time and measured 7. ...


During the dot-com boom of the 1990s, large numbers of entrepreneurs and computer software professionals moved into the city, followed by marketing and sales professionals, and changed the social landscape as once poorer neighborhoods became gentrified. The rising rents forced many people and businesses to leave, and this caused considerable tension in the city's politics. The resulting backlash resulted in a progressive majority winning control of the Board of Supervisors in the 2000 election. Events and trends Technology The World Wide Web was born at CERN Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... This once impoverished part of Jersey Citys historic downtown is quickly becoming gentrified. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


By 2001, the boom was over, and many people left San Francisco. SoMa, where many dot com companies were located, had been bustling and crowded with nearly no vacancies, but by 2002 was a virtual wasteland of empty offices and for-rent signs. Craig Newmark founded the website Craigslist based in his San Francisco home. The success of Craigslist stands as a testament to the over-production of the dot com era. South of Market or SOMA is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ... Craig Newmark (born circa 1952 in Morristown, New Jersey), is best known for being the founder of the San Francisco based internet website known as Craigslist. ... Screenshot of craigslist. ...


In November of 2002, three off-duty police officers (one the son of the assistant chief) allegedly assaulted two civilians over a bag of steak fajitas. The resulting scandal was dubbed "Fajitagate" after it was alleged that high-ranking officers within the Police Department had tried to cover up the incident. Though top officials were formally indicted, they were soon exonerated, but with considerable damage to their reputations, and having brought the city nationwide ridicule. In the lexicon of food, a fajita generically refers to grilled meat served on a flour tortilla with condiments. ...


The 2003 mayoral election of Matt Gonzalez versus Gavin Newsom was notable in that it was between a candidate of the progressive left and a moderate liberal, conservative candidates having had a hard time in the city. The newly elected Mayor Newsom, who won by a close margin, burst onto the national political scene when, in defiance of state law, he led San Francisco to become the first city in the U.S. to issue same-sex marriage licenses in February, 2004. The California Supreme Court later invalidated these licenses. Newsom also helped enact a strong new homeless policy, "Care Not Cash," in which the checks that homeless people previously received were replaced with vouchers for housing. 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | 1965 births | Green politicians ... Gavin Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco, California. ... The push by some civil rights supporters to create legal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States has been taking shape since the early 1970s. ... February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


San Francisco's history of innovative ordinances was seen again with the 2004 decision to ban outdoor smoking in all city-owned parks, plazas and public sports venues, amongst other outdoor areas. California's statewide smoking bans already being some of the toughest in the nation, the new policy in San Francisco represents an even stricter stance on public smoking. Other California cities have enacted similar outdoor smoking bans (though not as far-reaching), but San Francisco's new anti-smoking policy is significant considering the city's size and cultural influence on the rest of the state and the nation. While somewhat controversial, the law will go into effect on July 1, 2005. 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Smoking bans are government prohibitions on tobacco smoking in quasi-public indoor areas such as offices, restaurants, and hotels. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Geography and climate

San Francisco and northern San Mateo County, from NASA Landsat 7

San Francisco lies near the San Andreas Fault; a major source of earthquake activity in California. The most serious earthquake, in 1906, is mentioned above. Earlier significant quakes rocked the city in 1851, 1858, 1865, and 1868. The Daly City Earthquake of 1957 caused some damage. The Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which also did significant damage to parts of the city, is also famous for having interrupted a World Series baseball game between the Bay Area's two Major League Baseball teams, the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics. Download high resolution version (475x784, 393 KB)Public domain, from the USGS and NASA Landsat 7 program. ... Download high resolution version (475x784, 393 KB)Public domain, from the USGS and NASA Landsat 7 program. ... San Mateo County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ... Landsat 7 is the latest satellite of the Landsat program. ... View of the San Andreas Fault in central California The San Andreas Fault is a geological fault, known as a right-lateral strike-slip fault, that spans a length of roughly 800 miles (1287 kilometers) through California. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Daly City is a city located in San Mateo County, California, United States. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989 in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 pm local time and measured 7. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in North America, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... San Francisco Giants National League AAA Fresno Grizzlies AA Norwich Navigators A San Jose Giants Augusta GreenJackets Salem-Keizer Volcanoes R Scottsdale Giants The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. ... Oakland Athletics American League AAA Sacramento River Cats AA Midland RockHounds A Stockton Ports Kane County Cougars Vancouver Canadians R Phoenix Athletics The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. ...


The threat of another major earthquake like the 1906 one plays a major role in the city's infrastructure development. New buildings must be built to very high structural standards, while many dollars must be spent to retrofit the city's older buildings and bridges.


Entire neighborhoods of the city such as the Marina and Hunters Point were created and sit on man made landfill (made up of mud, sand, and rubble from past earthquakes) and other reclaimation projects over the San Francisco Bay when flatland became scarce. Such land is extremeley unstable and extra shaky during earthquakes, and the liquefaction that happends during quakes, causes extensive damage to property built over it as was evidenced in the Marina district during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. For other uses of this word, see Marina (disambiguation). ... Hunters Point or Bayview-Hunters Point is a neighborhood in the southeastern portion of San Francisco, California. ... A modern landfill operation. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate The San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary in which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... Liquefaction is the process by which saturated, unconsolidated soil or sand is converted into a suspension. ...


San Francisco is famous for its hills and the streets which run straight up and down them. Three of San Francisco's notable hill neighborhoods are Nob Hill, Russian Hill, and Telegraph Hill, all located in or near the downtown area. Nob Hill refers to a small district in San Francisco, California. ... Russian Hill is a primarily residential neighorhood within San Francisco, California, United States. ... Coit Tower (photo courtesy of Michael Doeff) Coit Tower is a notable landmark dedicated to the San Francisco, California firefighters. ...


Near the geographic center of the city and away from the downtown area, are a series of less populated hills. Dominating this area is Mount Sutro, which is the site of Sutro Tower, a large red and white radio transmission tower, that is a well known landmark to city residents. Nearby are the equally well known Twin Peaks, which are a pair of hills resting at one of the city's highest points. About 1.2km (1 mile) south of Mount Sutro is San Francisco's highest mountain, Mount Davidson, which is over 282 meters (over 925 feet) high. On top of Mount Davidson is a 31.4 meter (103 foot) tall cross built in 1934. Sutro Tower, viewed from the East Sutro Tower is a three-pronged antenna tower on Mount Sutro in the western part of San Francisco, California. ... The Twin Peaks The Twin Peaks are two hills with an elevation of about 920 feet that are located in San Francisco, California. ...


Not to be missed are the beautiful homes and area of the city known as Pacific Heights as well as victorians in the Haight-Ashbury and the "painted ladies" of the Castro. San Francisco is also famous for its Cable cars (narrow gauge, 1067 mm (3'6")), which were designed to carry residents up those steep hills. It is still possible to take a cable car ride up and down Nob and Russian Hills. Along with New Orleans' streetcars, San Francisco's cable cars are one of only two mobile United States National Monuments. Coit Tower, a notable landmark dedicated to San Francisco's firefighters, is located at the top of Telegraph Hill. Pacific Heights may refer to: An affluent neighborhood of San Francisco, California, on the north side of the city. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... Victorian houses called Painted Ladies at Alamo Square, San Francisco Painted ladies is an American vernacular term, used as an endearment, introduced in the 1970s to describe polychromed Victorian houses in the greater San Francisco area, which are usually painted in a multi-colored pastel scheme. ... Castro can refer to: Fidel Castro Raúl Castro Fidels younger brother Ramon Castro Fidels older brother Juana Castro Fidels sister The Castro, a famous gay-oriented neighborhood in San Francisco, California Castro Street, the primary street in that neighborhood Castro, an Italian city destroyed in 1649 Castro... Cable Car in San Francisco A San Francisco cable car A cable car or cable railway is a mass transit system using rail track mounted cars that are propelled by a continuously moving cable running at a constant speed. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... Coit Tower (photo courtesy of Michael Doeff) Coit Tower is a notable landmark dedicated to the San Francisco, California firefighters. ...


Surrounded on three sides by water, San Francisco's climate is strongly influenced by the cool currents of the Pacific Ocean. The weather is remarkably mild all year round, with a so-called Mediterranean climate characterized by cool, foggy summers and relatively warm winters; average daily high temperatures in the summer typically range from 15 -20 degrees Celsius (the upper 60s to low 70s Fahrenheit), while in the winter it virtually never reaches freezing. Rain in the summer is extremely rare, but winters can often be very rainy. Snow is virtually unheard of. The Pacific Ocean off the west coast of the city is particularly cold year round. The combination of cold ocean water and the high heat of the California mainland mean that San Francisco's western half is often shrouded in fog during the months of July and August. Thus, the summer temperatures are significantly lower in San Francisco than in other parts of inland California. The fog is less pronounced during the month of September, which is generally the warmest, most summer-like month of the year. A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles those of the lands bordering the Mediterranean Sea. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city and county has a total area of 600.7 km² (231.9 mi²). 120.9 km² (46.7 mi²) of it is land and 479.7 km² (185.2 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 79.86% water. The city itself is often reputed to be roughly a seven mile by seven mile square, but in fact it is slightly smaller, 46.7 mi², of which .33 mi² are the Farallon Islands. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... The Farallon Islands are a group of islands and rocks found in the Gulf of the Farallons outside of San Franciscos Golden Gate. ...


The geographical center of the city is on the east side of Grandview Avenue between Alvarado and Twenty-third Streets.


Economy

Because of the California gold rush, San Francisco became and remains the banking and financial center of the U.S. West Coast. It is the home of the twelfth district of the U.S. Federal Reserve as well as major production facilities for the U.S. Mint. The Pacific Exchange, a regional stock exchange, is located in the financial district. Many major American and international banks and venture capital firms have all set up their regional headquarters in the city. Gold rush handbill The California Gold Rush was a period in American history marked by mass hysteria concerning a gold discovery in Northern California. ... The West Coast States. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... The Pacific Exchange is a regional stock exchange located in San Francisco, California. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Companies headquartered in San Francisco

Some 65 km (~ 40 miles) south of San Francisco is the Silicon Valley, which holds much of the computing business in the world. Apple Computer and Symantec are based in Cupertino. Electronic Arts and Oracle Corporation are based in Redwood City. Sun Microsystems, Intel, Applied Materials, and McAfee are headquartered in Santa Clara. Yahoo! is headquartered in Sunnyvale. Google is headquartered (at the "Googleplex") in Mountain View. Cisco Systems and Adobe Systems are headquartered in San Jose. Hewlett Packard is in Palo Alto near Stanford University. Anchor Brewing Company is an alcoholic beverage producer, operating a microbrewery and distillery on Potrero Hill in San Francisco, California. ... Bechtel Corporation (Bechtel Group) is the largest civil engineering company in the world. ... Charles Schwab can refer to: Charles M. Schwab, 19th century industrialist and financier. ... Categories: Companies traded on NASDAQ | Corporation stubs | Websites | Internet companies of the United States ... Dolby Laboratories, Incorporated (Dolby Labs) is a company specializing in audio compression and reproduction. ... This article is about the clothing retailer. ... Levi Strauss & Co. ... Macromedia Logo Macromedia Logo used from 1997-2001 Macromedia (NASDAQ: MACR) is a graphics and web development software house. ... The McKesson Corporation (NYSE: MCK) is a large USA-based corporation specialising in medical and pharmaceutical products. ... Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is the utility that provides power to most of Northern California. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Viz, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, California, is a major American manga publisher. ... Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified financial services company in the United States, with consumer finance subsidiaries doing business in Canada, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Caribbean. ... Williams-Sonoma store at the Toronto Eatons Centre Williams-Sonoma, Inc. ... Screenshot of craigslist. ... In laymans terms, a method is a series of steps taken to accomplish an objective. ... Silicon Valley is a commonly used nickname for the southern part of the San Francisco Bay Area in northern California, USA, originally referring to the concentration of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually becoming a metaphor for the entire concentration of high tech businesses. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Symantec Corporation (NASDAQ: SYMC), founded in 1982, is an information security company headquartered in Cupertino, California that specializes in computer security and antivirus software. ... Cali Mill Plaza (Cupertino City Center) is located on the intersection of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards where the village of Westwood was established. ... Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: ERTS) is a leading video game developer and publisher. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL), one of the major companies developing database management systems, tools for database development, and enterprise resource planning software, dates from 1977 and has offices in more than 145 countries around the world. ... Redwood City is the county seat of San Mateo County, California. ... Sun Microsystems is a computer, semiconductor and software manufacturer headquartered in Santa Clara, California, in Silicon Valley. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) (founded 1968) is a US-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Applied Materials, Inc. ... McAfee, Inc. ... Santa Clara, founded in 1852, is a city located in Santa Clara County, in the U.S. state of California. ... ... Sunnyvale is a city located in Santa Clara County, California, USA. It is one of the major cities that make up the Silicon Valley. ... This page is about Google Inc. ... The Googleplex is the Google company headquarters, located in Mountain View, Santa Clara County, California, near San Francisco. ... Mountain Views Castro Street Mountain View is a city located in Santa Clara County, in the U.S. state of California, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 70,708. ... Cisco Systems, Inc. ... Adobe Systems (NASDAQ: ADBE) is a computer software company headquartered in San Jose, California that was founded in December 1982 by John Warnock and Charles Geschke. ... City nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location within Santa Clara County, California Country   State     County United States   California     Santa Clara Mayor Ron Gonzales Area  - Land  - Water 178. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Downtown Palo Alto Palo Alto is a city in Santa Clara County, in the San Francisco Bay Area of California, USA. Palo Alto is located at the northern end of the Silicon Valley, and is home to Stanford University (which is technically located in an adjacent area — Stanford, California), and... For other meanings of Stanford, see Stanford (disambiguation). ...


Outside of Silicon Valley, in the East Bay, Pixar Animation is located in Emeryville. ChevronTexaco (fomerly of San Francisco) and IPIX are based in San Ramon, Safeway is based in Pleasanton, and C & H Sugar Company is based in Crockett. LucasArts is located in Marin County, though the company plans to relocate to the Presidio in the next few years. The East Bay, in the northern part of the U.S. state of California, lies on the east shores of the San Francisco Bay and San Pablo Bay, and includes Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. ... ChevronTexaco Corporation ( NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... IPIX (Interactive Picture, Inc. ... San Ramon is a city located in Contra Costa County, California. ... Safeway (NYSE: SWY) is North Americas third largest supermarket chain, with over 1800 stores located throughout the central and western United States and Canada. ... Pleasanton is a city located in Alameda County, California. ... Crockett is a census-designated place located in Contra Costa County, California. ... LucasArts Entertainment Company (sometimes shortened to LEC), is a video game developer and publisher. ... Marin County is a county located in Californias San Francisco Bay Area, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. ... Presidio is a place in the State of Texas in the United States of America: see Presidio, Texas. ...


Law and government

Supervisors
1
Jake McGoldrick
2
Michela Alioto-Pier
3
Aaron Peskin
4
Fiona Ma
5
Ross Mirkarimi
6
Chris Daly
7
Sean Elsbernd
8
Bevan Dufty
9
Tom Ammiano
10
Sophie Maxwell
11
Gerardo Sandoval

San Francisco is both a city and a county, and is the only one of California's 58 counties to possess that distinction. It is governed by a mayor, who runs the executive branch of the city, and a Board of Supervisors, which comprises the legislative branch. The eleven members of the Board are elected to represent eleven districts in the city; current elected members are listed in the table on the right. Jake McGoldrick is a member of the San Francisco board of supervisors. ... Michela Alioto-Pier is a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. ... Aaron Peskin is the current president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. ... Categories: Stub ... Ross Mirkarimi represents District 5 on the San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors. ... Chris Daly is a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. ... Tom Ammiano is a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. ... A city is an urban area, differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ...


While most cities in California are General Law Cities, San Francisco is one of a few Charter Cities, theoretically giving the city's voters additional control over governmental structures and allowing the city to exercise considerable control over some lands not located in the city such as those associated with San Francisco International Airport and the Hetch Hetchy water and power system.


A recent electoral innovation that was to be implemented for the November 2003 elections, but was not prepared in time, is the use of ranked preference voting, also known as instant runoff voting. In the Board of Supervisors race in November 2004, Instant Runoff Voting worked well, with many winners known on election night and all winners within a couple of days. Due to its implementation, there was no December runoff election. (Although the city offices are, by state law, non-partisan, there are still considerable political differences among candidates that may generally be identified as being aligned with various parties.) When the single transferable vote voting system is applied to a single-winner election it is sometimes called instant-runoff voting (IRV), as it is much like holding a series of runoff elections in which the lowest polling candidate is eliminated in each round until someone receives majority vote. ...


One good place to read about San Francisco politics is at The Usual Suspects, at [2] (http://www.SFUsualSuspects.com).


The current mayor is Gavin Newsom. The current President of the Board of Supervisors is Aaron Peskin. Gavin Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco, California. ... Aaron Peskin is the current president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. ...


The headquarters of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the Supreme Court of California, and the First Appelate District of the California Courts of Appeal are in San Francisco. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of California District of Guam District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana... The Supreme Court of California is the state supreme court in California. ...


See also: List of Mayors of San Francisco, California Mayors of San Francisco Categories: Lists of mayors | Mayors of San Francisco ...

Demographics

Population of Asians in San Francisco. Note the large Asian population in the Sunset District, Richmond District, and in Chinatown

As of the census2 of 2000, there are 776,733 people, 329,700 households, and 145,068 families residing in the city. The population density is 6,423.2/km² (16,634.4/mi²), making it the fifth most dense city in the country [3] (http://gislounge.com/features/aa041101c.shtml). . There are 346,527 housing units at an average density of 2,865.6/km² (7,421.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 49.66% White, 7.79% African American, 0.45% Native American, 30.84% Asian, 0.49% Pacific Islander, 6.48% from other races, and 4.28% from two or more races. 14.10% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Large ethnic groups include Irish, Russian, Italian, and Chinese. This image is a self-generated thematic map from the U.S. Census Bureaus American Factfinder at http://factfinder. ... This image is a self-generated thematic map from the U.S. Census Bureaus American Factfinder at http://factfinder. ... The term Asian can refer to something or someone from Asia. ... The Sunset District is a neighborhood in the western half of San Francisco, California, USA that is primarily residential and is built along a grid pattern. ... The Richmond District is an area in the northwest of San Francisco, USA. Lying directly north of Golden Gate Park, the Richmond is bounded roughly by Fulton Street to the south, Arguello Street to the east, The Presidio and Lincoln Park to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the... An interesection of Chinatown in San Francisco. ... A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Shortcut: {{GR|#}} {{Cite:GR|#}} The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...

There are 329,700 households out of which 16.6% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.6% are married couples living together, 8.9% have a female householder with no husband present, and 56.0% are non-families. 38.6% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.8% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.30 and the average family size is 3.22. Download high resolution version (363x1317, 77 KB)Photo taken by me Jan. ... Download high resolution version (363x1317, 77 KB)Photo taken by me Jan. ... The Transamerica Pyramid. ... Marriage is a relationship and bond, most commonly between a man and a woman, that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 14.5% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 40.5% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females there are 103.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 103.1 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $55,221, and the median income for a family is $63,545. Males have a median income of $46,260 versus $40,049 for females. The per capita income for the city is $34,556. 11.3% of the population and 7.8% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 13.5% of those under the age of 18 and 10.5% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for an area may be defined as the total personal income in an area, divided by the number of people in that area. ... The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Related topics: Maps of San Francisco, California These thematic maps of San Francisco, California illustrate the different neighborhoods and the contrasting demographics of the diverse city. ...

Contemporary life

The city is serviced by several public transit systems. Muni is the city-owned public transit system which operates the Muni Metro light rail system, the F Market heritage streetcar line and the famous San Francisco cable car system (see above), together with buses and electric trolleybuses. BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) is the regional transit system, which connects San Francisco with the East Bay and the San Mateo County, California communities on the San Francisco Peninsula. In addition, a commuter rail service, Caltrain, operates between San Francisco, San Jose, California and Gilroy, California. A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... Two forms of public transport operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni): on the left, a bus (the 38 Geary line) and, on the right, the F Market historic streetcar. ... Muni Metro Map Muni Metro is a mass transit system operated in the city of San Francisco by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. ... F Market PCC cars at Jones Street terminal. ... A San Francisco cable car The San Francisco cable car system is the worlds last permanently operational manually operated cable car system, and is now an icon of the city of San Francisco in California. ... The Bus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... A trolleybus in Arnhem An electric trolleybus (also known as trolley bus or trackless trolley or simply trolley) is a bus powered by two overhead electric wires, from which the bus draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... BART (in full, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District) is a rapid transit electric train service that serves parts of the San Francisco Bay Area, including the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Fremont, and Walnut Creek. ... The East Bay, in the northern part of the U.S. state of California, lies on the east shores of the San Francisco Bay and San Pablo Bay, and includes Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. ... San Mateo County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... The San Francisco peninsula separates the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... In rail transport, a train consists of a single or several connected rail vehicles that are capable of being moved together along a guideway to transport freight or passengers from one place to another along a planned route. ... Caltrain is a public supported commuter rail line on the San Francisco Peninsula and the Santa Clara Valley in the United States. ... City nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location within Santa Clara County, California Country   State     County United States   California     Santa Clara Mayor Ron Gonzales Area  - Land  - Water 178. ... Gilroy is a city located in Santa Clara County, California. ...


San Francisco is the home of the San Francisco 49ers National Football League team and the San Francisco Giants Major League Baseball team. Conference NFC Division West Founded 1946 Home Field Monster Park City San Francisco, California Colors Cardinal red and gold, with black trim Head Coach Mike Nolan All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 498-379-15 The San Francisco 49ers are a National Football League team... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most popular professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities. ... San Francisco Giants National League AAA Fresno Grizzlies AA Norwich Navigators A San Jose Giants Augusta GreenJackets Salem-Keizer Volcanoes R Scottsdale Giants The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ...


The city is also the home of the annual Bay to Breakers footrace, which holds the world records for greatest number of participants in a footrace (110K in 1986) as well as longest consecutively running footrace (annually since 1912). Records aside, the race is best known for its colorful costumes and celebratory community spirit (it was initiated after the disastrous 1906 earthquake as a way to boost the city's spirits). San Francisco also has great nightlife, ranging from bars to lounges to clubs. Major areas of nightlife SF are: in North Beach, the Mission District, and SOMA. The Bay to Breakers is an annual footrace which takes place in San Francisco, California. ... A race is a distinct population of humans distinguished in some way from other humans. ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a reference book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of world records, both human achievements and the extrema of the natural world. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North Beach is a San Francisco, California neighborhood bounded by the former Barbary Coast, now Jackson Square, and the Financial District south of Broadway (except North Beach institutions extend down Columbus to Washington and Montgomery where the Black Cat originally was), Chinatown to the southwest of Columbus below Green, and... The Mission or the Mission District is the name of a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, built around the sixth California mission, the Mission San Francisco de Asis. ...


See also: Golden Gate Bridge, Northern California, San Francisco Bay Area, Silicon Valley, Market Street Milk Shake View to the northwest, towards the Marin headlands The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... Northern California (sometimes NorCal or NoCal) refers to the northern portion of the U.S. state of California, roughly covering all of those counties except for the ten counties which make up Southern California. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Silicon Valley is a commonly used nickname for the southern part of the San Francisco Bay Area in northern California, USA, originally referring to the concentration of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually becoming a metaphor for the entire concentration of high tech businesses. ... Market Street Milk Shake is an ironic term used in San Francisco, California to signify the citys continuing quality-of-life and homelessness problems. ...

Education

See main article: Education in San Francisco, California

Despite its limited geographical space, San Francisco is home to a multitude of Universities and Colleges. Public Universities include the University of California, San Francisco, located north of Forest Hill, San Francisco State University located in the southwest corner of the city near Lake Merced, and the Hastings Law School located downtown at its Civic Center. City College of San Francisco, one of the largest community colleges in the country is located in Vistication Valley. The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a public university located in San Francisco, California. ... Forest Hill is the name of several neighbourhoods: Forest Hill, London in London, England Forest Hill, Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada Forest Hill, San Francisco in San Francisco, California, United States Forest Hill, Newark, New Jersey in Newark, New Jersey, United States It is also the name of a number... San Francisco State University is a branch of the California State University system. ... Lake Merced is a freshwater lake located in the southwest corner of San Francisco, California. ... In Canada and the United States, a community college, sometimes called a junior college, is an educational institution providing post-secondary education and lower-level tertiary education, granting certificates, diplomas, and associates degrees. ...


Private schools include the Jesuit-run University of San Francisco, one of the first universities established west of the Mississippi located in the center of the city, Golden Gate University located downtown, and liberal arts school, New College of California located in the Mission district. The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... The University of San Francisco (often abbreviated USF) is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... Golden Gate University was founded as the night school arm of the San Francisco YMCA in 1853. ...

Neighborhoods

See main article: Neighborhoods in San Francisco, California

Like many large cities in the US, San Francisco has a Japantown and Chinatown; both are among the biggest in the US. It aslo boats a budding Vietnamese community in the Tenderloin neighborhood and a Russian community in the Richmond district. The Mission District is one of the oldest neighborhoods, as it was the site of one of the twenty one missions in California. Russian Hill is probably most noted for the top end of that portion of Lombard Street that is sometimes referred to as "the crookedest (most winding) street in the world". Haight-Ashbury gained prominence during the 1960s as one of the prominent concentrations of hippies. There are many neighborhoods in San Francisco, California, USA. Neighborhoods include: Victorian houses (Painted Ladies) at Alamo Square Anza Vista Bernal Heights Cathedral Hill The Castro Chinatown Cole Valley Cow Hollow Crocker-Amazon Diamond Heights Duboce Triangle Eureka Valley Excelsior Financial District Forest Hill Fillmore Glen Park Golden Gate Park... Japantown (also known as Nihonmachi (ja: 日本町), Little Osaka, and J Town) comprises about six square city blocks in the Western Addition in San Francisco. ... An interesection of Chinatown in San Francisco. ... Tenderloin is: Beef tenderloin Tenderloin, Manhattan Tenderloin, San Francisco Tenderloin, a musical from 1960, involved Hal Prince, Maurice Evans, Jerry Bock, Sheldon Harnick Tenderloin; a novel by Samuel Hopkins Adams. ... Richmond may refer to multiple places: Australia Richmond, New South Wales Richmond, Queensland Richmond, Tasmania Richmond, Victoria (also Richmond railway station) Canada Richmond, British Columbia Richmond, Ontario Richmond, Prince Edward Island Richmond, Quebec federal electoral districts: Richmond (electoral district), British Columbia (current) Richmond (Nova Scotia electoral district) (historic) Richmond (Quebec... The Mission or the Mission District is the name of a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, built around the sixth California mission, the Mission San Francisco de Asis. ... The Spanish Missions of California (more simply referred to as the California Missions) comprise a series of religious outposts established by Spanish Catholic Dominicans, Jesuits, and Franciscans, to spread the Christian doctrine among the local Native Americans, but with the added benefit of giving Spain a toehold in the frontier... Russian Hill is a primarily residential neighorhood within San Francisco, California, United States. ... There are at least two famous Lombard Streets Lombard Street, London, leading from the Bank of England to Gracechurch Lombard Street, San Francisco, famed for its twists and turns This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Hippie (or sometimes hippy) is a term originally used to describe some of the rebellious youth of the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Arguably, the point of gravity in terms of demographic and land use change is moving east & south. The South of Market neighborhood was one of the epicenters of the dot-com boom of the 1990s thus being a showcase of contemporary urban development. A new neighborhood is being developed at the far eastern end of South of Market that is being called Mission Bay. The cornerstone of this development is the new SBC Park baseball stadium and an extension of the University of California, San Francisco medical school. South of Market or SOMA is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ... South of Market or SOMA is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ... Mission Bay can refer to one of two places: Mission Bay is a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand Mission Bay is a park in San Diego, California, USA Categories: Disambiguation ... SBC Park (formerly Pacific Bell Park) is an open-air baseball stadium, home to the San Francisco Giants of the National League. ... The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a public university located in San Francisco, California. ...


Related topics: Maps of San Francisco, California These thematic maps of San Francisco, California illustrate the different neighborhoods and the contrasting demographics of the diverse city. ...

Parks

See main article: Parks in San Francisco, California

The best-known, as well as biggest, park is Golden Gate Park. Another notable park is The Presidio, which is just one part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which also includes Alcatraz. Buena Vista Park is the city's oldest, established in 1867. A large fresh-water lake, Lake Merced, is located in the south west corner of the city near San Francisco State University and Fort Funston. There are many parks in San Francisco, California, USA. Parks include: Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay Alamo Square Balboa Park Buena Vista Park Corona Heights Park Dolores Park Glen Canyon Park Golden Gate National Recreation Area Golden Gate Park Golden Gate View Park Grand View Park Lincoln Park Lake... The domed Conservatory of Flowers is one of the worlds largest. ... The Presidio of San Francisco is a park on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in the City and County of San Francisco. ... The Golden Gate National Recreation Area is a U.S. National Recreation Area, administered by the National Park Service, which surrounds the San Francisco Bay area. ... Alcatraz Island is located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California. ... The view from Buena Vista Park. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... Lake Merced is a freshwater lake located in the southwest corner of San Francisco, California. ... San Francisco State University is a branch of the California State University system. ...

Culture

See main article: Culture of San Francisco, California

Some of the most notable landmarks are the Transamerica Pyramid and Golden Gate Bridge. Museums include San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the California Palace of the Legion of Honor and the Cable Car Museum, along with offbeat museums such as Ripley's Believe it or Not Museum and the Tattoo Art Museum. Between Portola and Glenview streets lie San Francisco's high school SOTA (School of the Arts) dedicated to the performing arts. A San Francisco cable car The culture of San Francisco, California, USA is quite varied. ... The Transamerica Pyramid. ... View to the northwest, towards the Marin headlands The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) is a museum in San Francisco, California, of Mario Botta architect, dedicated to modern art. ... The Legion of Honor in San Francisco The California Palace of the Legion of Honor (often abbreviated to simply Legion of Honor by locals) is a fine-art museum in San Francisco. ... Categories: United States-related stubs | Museums in San Francisco | Transport museums ... Ripleys Believe It or Not! deals in the bizarre—events and items so strange and unusual that it is often hard to believe that they actually exist--but they do: believe it. ... Sōta is a Japanese given name. ...


San Francisco boasts the San Francisco Symphony, the San Francisco Opera and the San Francisco Ballet. San Franciso's Ballet and Opera are the some of the oldest continuning performing arts companies in the United States. San Francisco Opera (SFO) is the second largest opera company in North America. ...


The American Indian Film Institute which organizes the annual American Indian Film Festival is based in San Francisco. The American Indian Film Festival is an annual event in San Francisco. ...


San Francisco has been the setting for numerous television programs, such as Dharma & Greg, Full House, The Streets of San Francisco, Charmed, The Midnight Caller and, more recently, Monk. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Dharma & Greg was an American television situation comedy broadcast between 1997 and 2002 on ABC. The premise of the show was a relationship between two characters regarded as cultural opposites. ... The Streets of San Francisco was a television police drama set in San Francisco, California in the 1970s. ... Charmed is a U.S. television series about three sisters who are witches; they use their powers to fight evil. ... Good night America, wherever you are (famous quote and the last words at the end of the each episode) Probably the most moodiest of all TV series ever placed in San Francisco. ... Monk is a television show about an obsessive-compulsive detective named Adrian Monk (played by actor Tony Shalhoub). ...


Movies set in the city include Basic Instinct, The Conversation Edtv, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Game, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Pacific Heights, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Presidio, Dirty Harry and Vertigo. Sharon Stone as Catherine Tramell Basic Instinct (released March 20, American mystery film directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Joe Eszterhas. ... The Conversation is a 1974 film, a mystery and political thriller directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman. ... Enhanced definition television, extended definition television, or EDTV is a shorthand term for certain television formats. ... Robin Williams in character as Mrs. ... The term The Game can refer to several things. ... Guess Whos Coming to Dinner is a 1967 award-winning comedy- drama movie starring Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Sidney Poitier, and Katharine Houghton. ... Pacific Heights is a 1990 thriller film starring Melanie Griffith, Matthew Modine, and Michael Keaton. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The Presidio of San Francisco is a park on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in the City and County of San Francisco. ... For the 1953 nuclear test nicknamed Dirty Harry, see Upshot-Knothole Harry [1] Dirty Harry is a 1971 film directed by Don Siegel and starring Clint Eastwood as the eponymous Harry Callahan, a San Francisco detective tracking Scorpio, a serial killer. ... Vertigo is a 1958 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ...


Other fictional works set in San Francisco include The Joy Luck Club, The Maltese Falcon and Tales of the City. The Joy Luck Club is a best-selling novel written by Amy Tan. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version, directed by John Huston The Maltese Falcon is a detective novel by Dashiell Hammett which was made into a quintessential film noir movie. ... Tales of the City is a series of six books, originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle, written by San Francisco novelist Armistead Maupin. ...

City flag

The flag depicts an arising Phoenix, symbolic of the City's recovery from the 1906 fire. The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ...

City seal

The seal, which was adopted in the 1850's, depicts two working men, on one side a miner and on the other a sailor with a sextant. Above is a rising phoenix and behind is the bay with sailing ships. The Phoenix symbolizes the city's emergence from the ashes of several devastating fires in the early 1850's. The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein, or (coal) seam. ... Wooden sailing boat Sailing is motion across a body of water in a sailing ship, or smaller boat, powered by wind. ... A sextant is a measuring instrument used to measure the angle of elevation of a celestial object above the horizon. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ...

Ports

Airports

Seaports

  • Local
    • Port of San Francisco, administers entire waterfront, most northern piers are now limited to cruise boats and ferries while modern container traffic goes through India Basin in the southeast corner of the city
  • Further away
    • Port of Oakland, 24.1 km (15 miles) away from San Francisco, the primary cargo port for Northern California

Famous San Franciscans

See also: List of famous San Franciscans

Many notable people have grown up in or have lived as adults in San Francisco. Photographer Ansel Adams, comedian Gracie Allen, actor and director Clint Eastwood, "mother" of Modern Dance Isadora Duncan, Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead, author Jack London, Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett, and actor/comic Robin Williams are examples of notable arts and entertainment figures who have lived in the city. FAA diagram of SFO SFO redirects here. ... San Mateo County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Oakland International Airport is located in Oakland, California and serves the San Francisco Bay Area metro region. ... The Norman Y. Mineta San José International Airport is a medium-sized airport in San José, California. ... The Port of Oakland was the first major port on the Pacific Coast of the United States to build terminals for container ships. ... This is a list of famous San Franciscans: Albert Abrams, medical equipment inventor Ansel Adams, photographer Gracie Allen, comedian Abe Attell, boxer Bill Bixby, actor Barry Bonds, baseball player B.D. Wong, actor Bobby Bonds, baseball player Lisa Bonet, actress Benjamin Bratt, actor Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court Associate Justice Jerry... Farm workers at Manzanar War Relocation Center with Mt. ... Grace Allen, wife of comic legend George Burns, who started show business in vaudeville, became famous when teamed with him. ... Clint Eastwood Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... photo by Arnold Genthe Isadora Duncan (May 26, 1878 - September 14, 1927) was an American dancer. ... Jerry Garcia in his youth Jerry Garcia (born Jerome John Garcia), (August 1, 1942 - August 9, 1995) was famous as guitarist and primary singer of the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead, though his extensive career involved many other projects. ... Jerry Garcia later in life Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... Jack London, probably born John Griffith Chaney (January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916), was an American author of over 50 books. ... Old logo, as used in Master Of Puppets, circa 1986. ... Kirk Hammett Kirk Hammett (born November 18, 1962 in San Francisco, California, USA) is the lead guitarist in heavy metal group Metallica. ... Robin Williams performing in Iraq. ...


Baseball player Barry Bonds, American football legend O.J. Simpson, and baseball legend Joe DiMaggio are all sportspeople with San Francisco connections. Missing image Bonds at the plate Photo: Agência Brasil Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is a professional baseball player for the San Francisco Giants; he is most famous for his home run hitting. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... O.J. Simpson at USC. Orenthal James Simpson (born July 9, 1947), known by the initials O.J. (a common American abbreviation for orange juice) and nicknamed The Juice, is a Hall of Fame former college and professional football player and film actor. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio (November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999) was an American baseball player. ...


US Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, former Governors of California Jerry Brown and Pat Brown, US Senator Dianne Feinstein, former US Secretaries of Defense Robert McNamara and Caspar Weinberger, and gay rights activists Harvey Milk and Jose Sarria were or are San Franciscans who made names for themselves in politics. Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) has been a US Supreme Court Associate Justice since 1994. ... Jerry Brown Edmund Gerald Brown Jr. ... Edmund Gerald Brown Sr. ... Dianne Feinstein Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is a Democratic U.S. Senator from California, a position she has held since 1992. ... Robert McNamara in 1964 Robert Strange McNamara (born June 9, 1916), American businessman and politician, was United States Secretary of Defense from 1961 to 1968. ... Caspar Willard Weinberger (born August 18, 1917) is best known as United States Secretary of Defense under President Ronald Reagan from 1982 through 1987, and for his related roles in the Strategic Defense Initiative program (popularly known as Star Wars), and in the Iran-Contra Affair. ... Harvey Milk Harvey Milk (May 22, 1930 - November 27, 1978) an American politician and gay rights activist, was the first openly gay city supervisor of San Francisco, California. ... José Sarria (b. ...


Other famous San Franciscans include philanthropist Gordon Getty, publisher William Randolph Hearst, and co-founder of Intel Corporation and the author of Moore's law, Gordon E. Moore. Son of business titan J. Paul Getty (d. ... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ... The following article is about the multinational corporation; intel is also an abbreviation for intelligence, used in reference to military intelligence and espionage. ... Growth of transistor counts for Intel processors (dots) and Moores Law (upper line=18 months; lower line=24 months) Moores law is the empirical observation that at our rate of technological development, the complexity of an integrated circuit, with respect to minimum component cost will double in about... Gordon Moore Gordon Earl Moore (born January 3, 1929) is co-founder of Intel Corporation and the author of Moores law. ...

Trivia

  • San Francisco is a location in CRPG Fallout 2.
  • Captain Kirk's U.S.S. Enterprise was San Francisco–class but was later changed by script writers to a more appropriate (following United States Navy warship naming conventions) Constitution–class. Star Fleet Headquarters and Academy are located on what is currently the Presidio of San Francisco.

See also

External links

Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
    • Weather satellite image from NASA (http://wwwghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/get-goes?satellite=GOES-E%20CONUS&lat=37.759881&lon=-122.437392&zoom=1&info=ir&palette=spect.pal&width=600&height=500)
  • Travel guide to San Francisco from Wikitravel
  • Official website for the City and County of San Francisco (http://www.ci.sf.ca.us/)
  • Museum of the City of San Francisco (http://www.sfmuseum.org/)
  • Craigslist - http://www.craigslist.org/
  • A local's guide for people visiting or moving to San Francisco (http://www.dreamworld.org/sfguide) Neighborhood photo tours, maps, job-hunting, romantic walks, outdoor adventures, restaurant recommendations, advice on moving, finding romance, and more. Non-commercial site.
  • San Francisco History Index (http://www.zpub.com/sf/history/)
  • Chinatown (http://www.sanfranciscochinatown.com/)
  • Bay Area Public Transit Info, Schedules and Maps (http://transit.511.org/)
  • Orange Magazine (http://www.orange-mag.com) Orange Magazine covers San Francisco style and culture with an emphasis on local designers, artists, and businesses.
  • San Francisco Virtual Tour (http://www.virtuar.com/ysf2/) Walk around the city as if you are there.
  • Go San Francisco Card: 32 San Francisco Attractions and Tours (http://www.gosanfranciscocard.com/) One price includes museums, historic sites, excursions & more.
  • San Francisco Pride (http://www.sfpride.org/)
  • Gay San Francisco Business Directory (http://www.gay-sf.org/)
  • Historic Pictures of 19th Century San Francisco (http://sanfrancisco.cityviews.us/)
  • Old Palace Hotel (1875-1906) (http://CPRR.org/Museum/Palace_Hotel_SF/)
  • Bay Area Experiences.com (http://www.bayareaexperiences.com) Community-built site with fun, non-touristy things to do in San Francisco and surrounding areas.
  • SanFrancisco.com (http://www.sanfrancisco.com) City guide with free email and travel information.
  • Great color photographs of San Francisco (http://www.lodgephoto.com/galleries/usa/sanfrancisco/)
  • Photographs of the Golden Gate Bridge (http://www.lodgephoto.com/galleries/US/goldengate)
  • Nearlocal.com (http://www.nearlocal.com/) High density San Francisco Bay Area local restaurant listings and reviews
  • Guide to San Francisco (http://www.hotelssf.com)
  • Videos of San Francisco from the Prelinger Collection at archive.org (http://www.archive.org/movies/movieslisting-browse.php?collection=prelinger&cat=San%20Francisco)
  • Videos of San Francisco from the Shaping San Francisco collection at archive.org (http://www.archive.org/movies/movieslisting-browse.php?collection=shaping_sf)
  • MapWest.com includes detailed information for Visitors to San Francisco including maps, tour , neighborhood, travel information, web cams and tour reservations (http://www.mapwest.com)
  • Tour and Vacation activities for visitors to San Francisco and the Bay Area - From Bay Cruises to Guided Walking tours Online reservations (http://www.buysanfranciscotours.com)

Sources


Computer role-playing games (CRPGs), often shortened to simply role-playing games (RPGs), are a type of video or computer game that traditionally use gameplay elements found in paper-and-pencil role-playing games. ... Fallout box art Fallout is a computer role-playing game produced by Tim Cain and published by Interplay in 1997. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Abu Dhabi Abraham Lincoln Australia Adolf Hitler Animation Andorra Alaska Anatomy Asia Albert Einstein Asterales Automobile Aircraft Alexander Graham Bell Apple Computer American Civil War Ancient Egypt Asteraceae Alps Arches National Park Aarhus Almond Caesar Augustus Acacia Acropolis Acupuncture Amaranth Alexander... The Wikimedia Commons is (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Wikitravel logo Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Screenshot of craigslist. ...

State of California
File links The following pages link to this file: California Dana Rohrabacher Los Angeles, California San Francisco Peninsula San Francisco Bay Area Silicon Valley San Diego, California Sacramento, California Sacramento County, California Orange County, California Death Valley San Francisco, California Sierra Nevada (US) Oakland, California Fremont, California San Jose, California... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ...

Capital: Sacramento
Regions: Antelope Valley | Central Valley | Central Coast | Channel Islands | Coachella Valley | Coast Ranges | Conejo Valley | Death Valley | Gold Country | Greater Los Angeles | Imperial Valley | Inland Empire |
Mojave | Napa Valley | Northern California | Orange County Area | Owens Valley | Palm Springs Area | Pomona Valley | The Peninsula | Redwood Empire | San Diego Area | San Fernando Valley | San Francisco Bay Area | San Gabriel Valley | Santa Clara Valley | Santa Clarita Valley | Shasta Cascade | Sierra Nevada | Silicon Valley | Southern California | Wine Country
Major metros: Fresno | Los Angeles-Long Beach | Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario | Sacramento | San Diego | San José | San Francisco-Oakland | Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine
Other important metros: Bakersfield | Indio-Palm Springs | Modesto | Monterey-Salinas | Oceanside-Carlsbad-Vista | Palmdale-Lancaster | Redding | Santa Barbara-Santa Maria | Santa Rosa-San Rafael | Stockton | Visalia-Tulare-Porterville
Counties: Alameda | Alpine | Amador | Butte | Calaveras | Colusa | Contra Costa | Del Norte | El Dorado | Fresno | Glenn | Humboldt | Imperial | Inyo | Kern | Kings | Lake | Lassen | Los Angeles | Madera | Marin | Mariposa | Mendocino | Merced | Modoc | Mono | Monterey | Napa | Nevada | Orange | Placer | Plumas | Riverside | Sacramento | San Benito | San Bernardino | San Diego | San Francisco | San Joaquin | San Luis Obispo | San Mateo | Santa Barbara | Santa Clara | Santa Cruz | Shasta | Sierra | Siskiyou | Solano | Sonoma | Stanislaus | Sutter | Tehama | Trinity | Tulare | Tuolumne | Ventura | Yolo | Yuba |

  Results from FactBites:
 
San Francisco Board of Supervisors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (470 words)
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors is the legislature for San Francisco, California.
As the official name implies, the City and County San Francisco is a consolidated city-county, being simultaneously a charter city and charter county with a consolidated government, a status it has had since 1856.
San Francisco is the only California city with a board of supervisors, which is also the city council.
San Francisco Board of Supervisors Offends Vatican and Calls for Schism (406 words)
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a March 16 resolution publicly censuring the Catholic Church for its position forbidding adoption of children by homosexual pairs.
The Board also lambasted Cardinal William Levada, former Archbishop of San Francisco and present head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.
The attitude of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is a clear affront to all Catholics and an insult to the Vatican.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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