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Encyclopedia > San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate
San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate

San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. Technically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which help flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay, although the entire group of interconnected bays are often referred to as "the San Francisco Bay." San Francisco Bay © 2004 Matthew Trump File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A spring at the Sacramento River headwater The Sacramento River is the longest river in the state of California. ... The San Joaquin River, 330 miles (530 km) long, is the second-longest river in California, United States. ... River Gambia flowing through Niokolokoba National Park A river is a large natural waterway. ... The Sierra Nevada is a mountain range that is almost entirely in the eastern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... San Pablo bay with Suisun Bay at upper right Suisun Bay (pronounced sue-soon) is a shallow tidal estuary located in central California of The United States of America. ... Carquinez Strait The Carquinez Strait is a narrow tidal strait in northern California. ... The Napa River, approximately 50 mi (80 km) long, is a river in northern California in the United States. ... San Pablo Bay is a shallow tidal estuary that forms the northern extension of San Francisco Bay in northern California in the United States. ...


San Francisco Bay is located in the US state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area, dominated by the big cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City 122 km²  (47 sq mi)  - Land 121. ... Oakland, founded in 1852, is the eighth-largest city in California[1] and the county seat of Alameda County. ... Nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ...

Contents

Size

The Bay covers somewhere between 400[1] and 1600[2] square miles (1040 to 4160 square kilometres), depending on which sub-bays (such as San Pablo Bay), estuaries, wetlands, and so on are included in the measurement. The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west and somewhere between 48 miles (77 km)1 and 60 miles (97 km)2 north-to-south. One difficulty in obtaining accurate measurements is that the wetlands and inlets of the bay have been gradually and deliberately filled in, changing the Bay's size since the mid-1800s by as much as one third or even more. Recently, large areas of wetlands have been restored, further confusing the issue of the Bay's size. Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ...


Despite its value as a waterway and harbor, the many thousands of acres (several km²) of marshy wetlands forming the edges of the bay were considered for many years to be wasted space. As a result, soil excavated for building projects or dredged from channels was often dumped onto the wetlands and into other parts of the bay as landfill. From the mid-1800s through the late 1900s, more than a third of the original bay was filled and often built on. The deep, damp soil in these areas is subject to liquefaction during earthquakes, and most of the major damage close to the Bay in the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 occurred to structures on these areas. In the 1990s, the San Francisco International Airport proposed filling in hundreds more acres (km²) to extend its overcrowded international runways in exchange for purchasing other parts of the bay and converting them back to wetlands. The idea was, and remains, controversial. (For further details, see the "Bay Fill and Depth Profile" section.) A harbor or harbour (see spelling differences), or haven, is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... Earthquake liquefaction, often referred to simply as liquefaction, is the process by which saturated, unconsolidated soil or sand is converted into a suspension during an earthquake. ... An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on Tuesday October 17, 1989, in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 p. ... FAA diagram of SFO SFO redirects here. ... Runway 13R/31L of El Dorado International Airport, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. ...


Role in California settlement

The first recorded European discovery of the San Francisco Bay was on November 4, 1769 when Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolà, unable to find the port of Monterey, California, moored his ship close to what is now Pacifica. Short on water and food, Portolà and an expeditionary crew of 63 men and 200 horses began an overland journey that took them to the summit of the 1200 foot high Sweeney Ridge, where he sighted the San Francisco Bay. Sweeney Ridge is located in northern San Mateo County, California and is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area where a monument marks the discovery site. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NPS-68000022) as No. 394: Site of the Discovery of San Francisco Bay. World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Gaspar de Portolà (circa 1717 – aft. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Cradle of History, Californias First City Location Location of Monterey, California Government County Monterey Mayor Dan Albert Geographical characteristics Area     City 11. ... Pacifica is a city in San Mateo County, California, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean between San Francisco and Half Moon Bay. ... Official website: http://www. ... The Golden Gate National Recreation Area is a U.S. National Recreation Area, administered by the National Park Service, which surrounds the San Francisco Bay area. ... The National Register of Historic Places is the USAs official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects worthy of preservation. ...


The first European to enter the bay is believed to have been the Spanish explorer Juan de Ayala, who passed through the Golden Gate on August 5, 1775 in his ship the San Carlos, and moored in a bay of Angel Island now known as Ayala Cove. Juan de Ayala (28th December, 1745 - 30th December, 1797) was a Spanish naval officer who played a significant role in the European exploration of California, since he and the crew of his ship the San Carlos are the first Europeans known to have entered the San Francisco Bay. ... The Golden Gate The Golden Gate, looking south towards San Francisco. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... ... Angel Island as seen from the sky Angel Island is an island in San Francisco Bay which offers spectacular views of the San Francisco skyline, the Marin County Headlands and Mount Tamalpais. ...


This famous bay was the center of American settlement in the Far West during the 19th century. From the 1820s onward, American presidents and expansionists coveted the bay as a great natural harbor in the Pacific. After many failed efforts to buy the bay and varying areas around it, the US Navy and Army seized the region from Mexico during the Mexican-American War (1845-1848). On February 2, 1848 California seceded from Mexico with the signing of the Guadalupe-Hidalgo treaty. A year and a half after gaining independence, California requested to join the United States on December 3, 1849 and was accepted as the 31st State of the union on September 9, 1850. During the California gold rush of 1848-1850s, San Francisco Bay instantly became one of the world's greatest seaports, dominating shipping and transportation in the American West until the last years of the nineteenth century. The bay's regional importance became paramount when in 1869 the transcontinental railroad located its western terminus in Oakland. San Francisco Bay continues to support some of the densest industrial production and urban settlement in the United States. The San Francisco Bay Area is the American West's second-largest urban area with approximately 8 million residents. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events and Trends Nationalistic independence movements helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece declares independence from the Ottoman Empire (1821). ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the United States armed forces and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A California Gold Rush handbill A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... // Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... A transcontinental railroad is a railway that crosses a continent, typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ...

San Francisco Bay from space, September 1994
San Francisco Bay from space, September 1994

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (639x634, 137 KB)San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA - September 1994 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (639x634, 137 KB)San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA - September 1994 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Ecology

Despite its urban and industrial character, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta remain perhaps California's most important ecological habitats. California's Dungeness crab, Pacific halibut, and Pacific salmon fisheries rely on the bay as a nursery. The few remaining salt marshes now represent most of California's remaining salt marsh, supporting a number of endangered species and providing key ecosystem services such as filtering pollutants and sediments from the rivers. Most famously, the bay is a key link in the Pacific Flyway. Millions of waterfowl annually use the bay shallows as a refuge. Two endangered species of birds are found here: the California least tern and the California clapper rail. Exposed bay muds provide important feeding areas for shorebirds, but underlying layers of bay mud pose geological hazards for structures near many parts of the bay perimeter. San Francisco Bay provided the nation's first wildlife refuge, Oakland's artificial Lake Merritt (constructed in the 1860s) and America's first urban National Wildlife Refuge, the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (SFBNWR) (1972). The Sacramento Delta. ... Ernst Haeckel coined the term oekologie in 1866. ... Habitat (from the Latin for it inhabits) is the place where a particular species lives and grows. ... Binomial name Cancer magister Dana, 1852 The Dungeness crab is a species of crab that inhabits eelgrass beds and water bottoms from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska to Santa Cruz, California [1]. Its binomial name, Cancer magister, simply means master crab in Latin. ... Fiorello LaGuardia with a 300-pound halibut at the Fulton Fish Market. ... Illustration of a male Coho Salmon The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow to 1. ... A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... In biology, a species is one of the basic units of biodiversity. ... Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow and which eventually is deposited as a layer of solid particles on the bed or bottom of a body of water or other liquid. ... The Pacific Flyway is one of the four major migration route for waterfowl in the United States, Canada and Mexico. ... Falcated Duck at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands centre, Gloucestershire, England Wildfowl or waterfowl, also waterbirds, is the collective term for the approximately 147 species of swans, geese and ducks, classified in the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. ... The critically endangered Amur Tiger, a rare subspecies of tiger. ... Trinomial name Sterna antillarum browni Mearns The California Least Tern, Sterna antillarum browni, is a subspecies of Least Tern that breeds in bays of the Pacific Ocean within a very limited range in Orange County, San Diego County and extreme northern Mexico. ... Trinomial name Rallus longirostris obsoletus Ridgway, 1874 The California Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) is an endangered subspecies of the Clapper Rail (. It is found principally in Californias San Francisco Bay, and also in Monterey Bay and Morro Bay. ... Richardson Bay mudflats of are exposed layers of bay mud Bay mud consists of thick deposits of soft, unconsolidated silty clay, which is saturated with water; these soil layers are situated at the bottom of certain estuaries, which are normally in temperate regions that have experienced cyclical glacial cycles. ... Families Charadridae Jacanidae Rostratulidae Ibidorhynchidae Recurvirostridae Haematopodidae Scolopacidae Dromadidae Burhinidae Glareolidae Thinocoridae Waders, called Shorebirds in North America (where wader is used to refer to long-legged wading birds such as storks and herons), are members of the order Charadriiformes, excluding the more marine web-footed seabird groups. ... Looking west across Lake Merritt. ... // Events and trends Technology The First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is a US National Wildlife Refuge located in San Francisco Bay, California. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area.
USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Tellingly, much of the SFBNWR consists of salt evaporation ponds purchased or leased from Leslie Salt Company and its successor, Cargill Corporation. These salt ponds produce salt for a variety of industrial purposes, including chlorine bleach and plastics manufacture, as well as supporting dense populations of brine shrimp, and therefore serving as feeding areas for waterfowl. In 2003, California and Cargill entered one of the largest private land purchases in American history, with the state and federal governments paying about $200 million for 16,000 acres (65 km²) of salt ponds in the south bay. SFBNWR and state biologists hope to restore some of the recently purchased ponds as tidal wetlands. Download high resolution version (770x800, 98 KB)Bay Area Satellite MAP from USGS File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (770x800, 98 KB)Bay Area Satellite MAP from USGS File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A magnified crystal of a salt (halite/sodium chloride) A salt, in chemistry, is any ionic compound composed of cations (positively charged ions) and anions (negative ions) so that the product is neutral (without a net charge). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cargill, Incorporated is a privately held, multinational corporation, and is based in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Atomic mass 35. ... In chemistry, to bleach something generally means to whiten it or oxidize it. ... Household items made out of plastic. ... Species Artemia franciscana Artemia gracilis Artemia monica Artemia nyos Artemia parartemia Artemia parthenogenetica Artemia persimilis Artemia pollicaris Artemia salina Artemia sinica Artemia tibetiana Artemia tunesiana Artemia urmiana Brine shrimp (Artemia) are a type of aquatic crustacean. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tides are the cyclic rising and falling of Earths ocean surface caused by the tidal forces of the Moon and the Sun acting on the Earth. ...


The seasonal range of water temperature in the Bay is from about 8°C to about 23°C.

San Francisco Bay ca. 1770-1820
San Francisco Bay ca. 1770-1820
San Francisco Bay ca. 1985-1996
San Francisco Bay ca. 1985-1996

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (559x675, 205 KB) San Francisco Estuary Institute (sfei. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (559x675, 205 KB) San Francisco Estuary Institute (sfei. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (560x675, 211 KB) San Francisco Estuary Institute (sfei. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (560x675, 211 KB) San Francisco Estuary Institute (sfei. ...

Bay Fill and Depth Profile

San Francisco Bay's profile changed dramatically in the late nineteenth century and again with the initiation of dredging by the US Army Corps of Engineers in the twentieth century. Before about 1860, most bay shores (exception: rocky shores such as those in Carquinez Strait, along Marin shoreline, Point Richmond, Golden Gate area) contained extensive wetlands that graded nearly invisibly from freshwater wetlands to salt marsh and then tidal mudflat. A deep channel ran through the center of the bay, following the ancient drowned river valley. United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ...


In the 1860s and continuing into the early twentieth century, miners dumped staggering quantities of mud and gravel from hydraulic mining operations into the upper Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. GK Gilbert's estimates of debris total more than eight times the amount of rock and dirt moved during construction of the Panama Canal. This material flowed down the rivers, progressively eroding into finer and finer sediment, until it reached the bay system. Here some of it settled, eventually filling in Suisun Bay, San Pablo Bay, and San Francisco Bay, in decreasing order of severity. Hydraulic mining is a large-scale form of placer mining. ...


By the end of the nineteenth century, these "slickens" had filled in much of the shallow bay flats, raising the entire bay profile. New marshes were created in some areas. Tailings (also known as tailings pile, slickens[1] or gangue) are the waste materials left over[2] after removing the minerals from ore. ...


In the last years of the nineteenth and first decades of the twentieth century, at the behest of local political officials and following Congressional orders, the US Army Corps began dredging the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and the deep channels of San Francisco Bay. This work has continued without interruption ever since, an enormous federal subsidy of San Francisco Bay shipping. Some of the dredge spoils were initially dumped in the bay shallows (including helping to create "Treasure Island" on the former shoals to the north of Yerba Buena Island) and used to raise an island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The net effect of dredging has been to maintain a narrow deep channel - deeper perhaps than the original bay channel - through a much shallower bay. At the same time, most of the marsh areas have been filled or blocked off from the bay by dikes. An aerial view of Treasure Island in the foreground, with its link to Yerba Buena Island in the background. ... A shoal is a sandbank or bar creating a shallow. ... An aerial view of Yerba Buena Island in the background, with its link to Treasure Island in the foreground. ... Dyke (normal International spelling) or Dike (normal American spelling) can mean several things: A dyke / dike is a long wall built to keep out the sea or enclose land. ...


Miscellaneous

San Francisco Bay is spanned by five bridges: the Golden Gate Bridge (which was the largest single span suspension bridge ever built at the time of its construction), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, the Hayward-San Mateo Bridge and the Dumbarton Bridge. The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... A suspension bridge is a type of bridge that has been made since ancient times as early as CE 100. ... The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is the northernmost of the east-west crossings of the San Francisco Bay in California, USA, connecting Richmond on the east to San Rafael on the west end. ... The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge ( ; known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a toll bridge which spans San Francisco Bay and links the California cities of Oakland and San Francisco in the United States, as part of Interstate 80. ... Eastern causeway portion of San Mateo-Hayward Bay Bridge (view from Hayward looking west toward San Mateo) The San Mateo-Hayward Bridge is a bridge crossing the San Francisco Bay, in the US, linking the San Francisco Peninsula with the East Bay. ... The Dumbarton Bridge is the southernmost of the highway bridges that span the San Francisco Bay in California. ...


There are four large islands in San Francisco Bay. Isolated in the center of the Bay is Alcatraz, the site of the famous and allegedly escape-proof federal penitentiary. Mountainous Yerba Buena Island is pierced by a tunnel linking the east and west spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Attached to the north is the artificial and flat Treasure Island, site of the 1939 World's Fair. Closest to shore, Angel Island was known as "Ellis Island West" because it served as the entry point for immigrants from East Asia. Raccoon Strait, between Tiburon and Angel Island, is the deepest part of the Bay.) The federal prison on Alcatraz Island no longer functions, and the complex is now a popular tourist site. Alcatraz Island is located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California. ... An aerial view of Yerba Buena Island in the background, with its link to Treasure Island in the foreground. ... An aerial view of Treasure Island in the foreground, with its link to Yerba Buena Island in the background. ... A Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... Angel Island as seen from the sky Angel Island is an island in San Francisco Bay which offers spectacular views of the San Francisco skyline, the Marin County Headlands and Mount Tamalpais. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... Tiburon is an affluent town in Marin County, California. ... Alcatraz Island (some times referred to as The Rock) is a small island located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California, United States that served as a lighthouse, then a military fortification, and then a federal prison for the area until 1969, when it became a national recreation...

Alcatraz at dawn on San Francisco Bay
Alcatraz at dawn on San Francisco Bay

The southern part of the Bay, around the city of San Jose, is known as Silicon Valley for its high concentration of high-tech, semiconductor and computer-related industry. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x683, 185 KB) Summary Alcatraz from Treasure Island, 01/07/2005 7am Licensing Attribution should mention Ben Peoples as the photographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x683, 185 KB) Summary Alcatraz from Treasure Island, 01/07/2005 7am Licensing Attribution should mention Ben Peoples as the photographer. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ... A semiconductor is a solid whose electrical conductivity can be controlled over a wide range, either permanently or dynamically. ... A BlueGene supercomputer cabinet. ...


The San Francisco Bay is a mecca for sailors, due to consistent strong winds (Beaufort force 6 is common on summer afternoons) and protection from large open ocean swells. Yachting and yacht racing are popular pastimes and the San Francisco Bay area is home to many of the world's top sailors. The Beaufort scale is an empirical measure for describing wind intensity based mainly on observed sea conditions. ... Yachting is a noncommercial boating activity. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ...


Arguably the most famous individual whale in history, Humphrey the whale, entered San Francisco Bay twice on errant migrations, and was successfully rescued and redirected each time. The open ocean is natural habitat to Humpback whales Humphrey the whale is arguably the most widely publicized humpback whale in history,[1][2] having errantly entered San Francisco Bay twice, departing from his Mexico to Alaska migration. ...


On an episode of Is It Real? it was discussed that there had been sightings of a large Sea Monster like creature in the Bay. It apparently is supposed to resemble a giant sea snake(even though no sea snakes live in that part of the world) As yet, there is no 'official' for the cryptid. Is It Real? is one of the television shows of the National Geographic Channel. ... Picture taken from a Hetzel copy of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Sea monsters are sea-dwelling, mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. ... Genus Aipysurus Amydocephalus Acalyptophis Astrotia Enhydrina Ephalophis Hydrelaps Hydrophis Kerilia Kolpophis Lapemis Parahydrophis Pelamis Thalassophina Thalassophis Laticauda Sea snakes of several different species belong to a group related to the cobras but are aquatic rather than land dwelling. ...


Photography

See also

There are several islands in San Francisco Bay. ... The following airports are located in the area around the San Francisco Bay, including the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco, and Oakland, as well as surrounding communities. ... The Golden Gate The Golden Gate, looking south towards San Francisco. ... Mount Tamalpais (Mount Tam) is a peak in Marin County, California, USA. It is a popular hiking destination for residents of the San Francisco Bay Area, home to the Edgewood Botanic Garden, and often considered symbolic of Marin County. ... Mount Diablo State Park is a state park in California, USA. View of Mt. ... The Point Pinole Regional Shoreline is a regional park on the shores of the San Pablo Bay, California (the northern arm of the San Francisco Bay). ... Marin County (pronounced mah-RIN) is a county located in the North San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. ...

References

  • 1999 Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia.
  • 1988 Encyclopedia Britannica.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
San Francisco Bay - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1384 words)
San Francisco Bay is located in the US state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area, dominated by the big cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose.
San Francisco Bay is spanned by five bridges: the Golden Gate Bridge (which was the largest single span suspension bridge ever built at the time of its construction), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, the Hayward-San Mateo Bridge and the Dumbarton Bridge.
The San Francisco Bay is a mecca for sailors, due to consistent strong winds (Beaufort force 6 is common on summer afternoons) and protection from large open ocean swells.
San Francisco Bay - definition of San Francisco Bay in Encyclopedia (833 words)
This famous bay was the epicenter of American settlement in the Far West during the 19th century.
San Francisco Bay is spanned by five bridges: the Golden Gate Bridge (which was the largest suspension bridge ever built at the time of its construction), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, the Hayward-San Mateo Bridge and the Dumbarton Bridge.
The southern part of the San Francisco Peninsula including the city of San Jose is known as the Silicon Valley for its high concentration of high-tech, semiconductor and computer-related industry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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