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Encyclopedia > San Andreas fault
View of the San Andreas Fault on the Carrizo Plain in central California, 35°07'N, 119°39'W
View of the San Andreas Fault on the Carrizo Plain in central California, 35°07'N, 119°39'W

The San Andreas Fault is a geological fault that runs a length of roughly 800 miles (1300 kilometres) through western and southern California in the United States. The fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault, marks a transform (or sliding) boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate. Image File history File links Sanandreasfault_srtm. ... Image File history File links Sanandreasfault_srtm. ... The Carrizo Plain is a large enclosed plain, approximately 50 miles (80 km) long and up to 15 miles (24 km) across, in eastern San Luis Obispo County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Geologic faults, fault lines or simply faults are planar rock fractures, which show evidence of relative movement. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... A compass rose with South highlighted South is most commonly a noun, adjective, or adverb indicating direction or geography. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... In plate tectonics, a transform boundary (also known as transform fault boundary, transform plate boundary, transform plate margin, slip boundary or conservative plate boundary) is said to occur when tectonic plates slide and grind against each other along a transform fault. ...  The Pacific plate, shown in pale yellow The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate beneath the Pacific Ocean. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...


The fault was first identified in Northern California by UC Berkeley geology professor Andrew Lawson in 1895 and named by him after a small lake which lies in a linear valley formed by the fault just south of San Francisco, the Laguna de San Andreas. Following the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, it was Lawson who also discovered that the San Andreas Fault stretched well southward into Southern California. Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Andrew Steve Bradley Lawson was born on January 21st 1991. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... San Andreas Lake (from Spanish, Laguna de San Andreas) is the name of an upland lake on the San Francisco Peninsula south of the city of San Francisco, California. ... San Francisco Earthquake of 1906: Ruins in vicinity of Post and Grant Avenue. ...

Contents

Southern, central, and northern segments

The San Andreas Fault can be divided into three segments.

Map of the San Andreas Fault, showing relative motion.
Map of the San Andreas Fault, showing relative motion.

The southern segment (known as the Mojave segment) begins near the Salton Sea at the northern terminus of the East Pacific Rise and runs northward before it begins a slow bend to the west when it meets the San Bernardino Mountains. Here, it runs along the southern base of the San Bernardino Mountains, crosses through the Cajon Pass and continues to run northwest along the northern base of the San Gabriel Mountains. These mountains are a result of movement along the San Andreas Fault and are commonly called the Transverse Range. This segment of the fault is the most commonly analyzed of any fault in the world by geologists. This is due to a cutout of the fault in Palmdale (the second largest city directly sitting on the fault) where the Antelope Valley Freeway passes through it, and the deep layers of "shifted" crust can clearly be seen. Image File history File links Sanandreas. ... Image File history File links Sanandreas. ... For the indigenous American tribe, see Mohave. ... The Salton Sea is an inland saline lake, located in the Colorado Desert in Southern California, north of the Imperial Valley. ... The East Pacific Rise is a long north-south welt of seafloor spreading under the eastern Pacific Ocean from near Antarctica in the south northward to its termination at the northern end of the Gulf of California in the Salton Sea basin in southern Pennsylvania California. ... {{Otheruses4|north the direction}} [[Image:CompassRose16_N.png|thumb|250px|right|[[Compass rose]] with north highlighted and at top]] {{wiktionary}} <nowiki>North is o<nowiki>ne of the [[4 (numbe</nowiki> Block quote r)|four]] cardinal directions, specifically the direction that, in Western culture, is treated as the primary direction: north... San Bernardino Mountains The San Bernardino Mountains are short transverse mountain range northeast of Los Angeles in southern California in the United States. ... Cajon Pass (elevation 4190 ft. ... San Gabriel Mountains The San Gabriel Mountains are located in northern Los Angeles County and western San Bernardino County, California, USA. The mountain range forms a barrier between the Greater Los Angeles Area and the Mojave Desert. ... The Transverse ranges are a group of mountain ranges of southern California, part of the North American Coast Ranges that run along the Pacific coast from Alaska to Mexico. ... A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology. ... Motto: Aerospace Capital of America Location of Palmdale in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California County Los Angeles  - Mayor James C. Ledford Jr. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Antelope Valley Freeway is a freeway in Los Angeles and Kern counties in southern California. ... Earth cutaway from core to exosphere. ...


After crossing through Frazier Park, the fault begins to bend northwards. This area is referred to as the "Big Bend" and is thought to be where the fault locks up in Southern California as the plates try to move past each other. This section of the fault has a recurrence interval of roughly 140-160 years. Northwest of Frazier Park, the fault runs through the Carrizo Plain, a long, treeless plain within which much of the fault is plainly visible. The Elkhorn Scarp defines the fault trace along much of its length within the plain. Frazier Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kern County, California, United States. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ... The Carrizo Plain is a large enclosed plain, approximately 50 miles (80 km) long and up to 15 miles (24 km) across, in eastern San Luis Obispo County, California. ... In geography, a plain is a large area of land with relatively low relief. ...


The central segment of the San Andreas fault runs in a northwestern direction from Parkfield to Hollister. While the southern section of the fault and the parts through Parkfield experience earthquakes, the rest of the central section of the fault exhibits a phenomenon called aseismic creep. This term describes the fault being able to move without causing earthquakes. Parkfield is a village in Monterey County, California. ... A house sitting atop the Calaveras Fault Hollister is the county seat of San Benito County, California. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In geology, aseismic creep is measurable surface displacement along a fault in the absence of notable earthquakes. ...


The northern segment of the fault runs from Hollister, through the Santa Cruz Mountains, epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, then on up the San Francisco Peninsula, where it was first identified by Professor Lawson in 1895, then offshore at Pacifica at Mussel Rock. This is the approximate location of the epicenter of the 1906 earthquake. The fault returns onshore at Bolinas Lagoon just north of Stinson Beach in Marin County. It returns underwater through the linear trough of Tomales Bay which separates the Point Reyes Peninsula from the mainland, returning onshore at Fort Ross. From there it continues overland, forming in part a linear valley through which the Gualala River flows. It goes back offshore at Point Arena. After that, it runs underwater along the coast until it nears Cape Mendocino, where it begins to bend to the west, terminating at a triple junction with the Mendocino Fracture Zone and the Cascadia subduction zone. To the north lies the Gorda Plate which is being subducted under the margin of the North American plate. The Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are a mountain range in central California, United States. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989, in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 p. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Pacifica is a city in San Mateo County, California, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean between San Francisco and Half Moon Bay. ... Mussel Rock is a physical feature on the coast of San Mateo County, California, offshore from the city of Daly City. ... Bolinas Lagoon is a tidal estuary, approximately 3 square miles (8 square km) in area, in Marin County in California in the United States. ... Stinson Beach Stinson Beach is a census-designated place (CDP) in Marin County, California, United States. ... Marin County is a county located in Californias San Francisco Bay Area, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. ... Tomales Bay Tomales Bay is a long narrow inlet of the Pacific Ocean in Marin County in northern California in the United States. ... Point Reyes Point Reyes is a prominent cape on the Pacific coast of northern California in the United States. ... Fort Ross is a former Russian fur trade outpost in what is now Sonoma County, California (United States). ... The Gualala River is a river on the northern coast of California. ... Point Arena and the Point Arena lighthouse, looking southward from Manchester State Beach. ... Cape Mendocino in Humboldt County, California, USA, is the westernmost point on the coast of California. ... A triple junction is the point where three tectonic plates diverge. ... Cape Mendocino in Humboldt County, California, USA, is the westernmost point on the coast of California. ... Structure of the Cascadia subduction zone Area of the Cascadia subduction zone The Cascadia subduction zone is a very long sloping fault that stretches from northern Vancouver Island to northern California. ... The Gorda Plate is a small oceanic tectonic plate beneath the Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...


Plate movement

Historical movement of the San Andreas Fault
Historical movement of the San Andreas Fault

All land west of the fault on the Pacific Plate is moving slowly to the northwest while all land east of the fault is moving to the southwest (relatively southeast as measured at the fault) under the influence of plate tectonics. The rate of slippage averages approximately 33-37 mm/year across California. [1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (800x1130, 137 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): San Andreas Fault Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (800x1130, 137 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): San Andreas Fault Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used...  The Pacific plate, shown in pale yellow The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate beneath the Pacific Ocean. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ...


Projected motion indicates that the Gulf of California will expand northward at the same time that the landmass west of the fault, including the Baja California peninsula and the California coast (including Los Angeles) slides past San Francisco, then continuing northwestward as an island mass toward the Aleutian Trench, over a period of perhaps twenty million years. The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. ... Baja California (literally lower California in Spanish) is the northernmost state of Mexico. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Aleutian Trench is an oceanic trench in the Earths crust. ...


Scientific research

Research at Parkfield

Further south in central California is the small town of Parkfield, California, which lies along the San Andreas Fault. Seismologists discovered that this section of the fault consistently produces magnitude 6.0 earthquakes about every 22 years. Following earthquakes in 1857, 1881, 1901, 1922, 1934, and 1966, scientists predicted an earthquake to hit Parkfield in 1993. This quake eventually struck in 2004 (see Parkfield earthquake). Because of this frequent activity and prediction, Parkfield has become one of the most popular spots in the world to try to capture and record large earthquakes. Parkfield is a village in Monterey County, California. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963&#8211;1998. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up forecast in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Parkfield is a village in Monterey County, California. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Activity snapshot 35 hours after Sept 28, 2004 large earthquake. ...


In 2004, work began just north of Parkfield on the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). The goal of SAFOD is to drill a hole nearly 3 kilometers into the Earth's crust and into the San Andreas Fault. An array of sensors will be installed to capture and record earthquakes that happen near this area.[2] shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Andreas Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a National Science Foundation project located near the town of Parkfield, California that will drill down nearly 1. ...


The University of California study on "the next big one"

A study completed by Yuri Fialko[3] has demonstrated that the San Andreas fault has been stressed to a level sufficient for the next "big one," as it is commonly called, that is, an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 or greater. The study also concluded that the risk of a large earthquake may be increasing faster than researchers had previously believed. Fialko also emphasized in his study that, while the San Andreas Fault has experienced massive earthquakes in 1857 at its central section and in 1906 at its northern segment (the great San Francisco earthquake), the southern section of the fault has not seen a similar rupture in at least 300 years. The Richter magnitude scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ...


If such an earthquake were to occur, Fialko's study stated, it would result in substantial damage to Palm Springs and a number of other cities in San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial counties in California, and Mexicali municipality in Mexico. Such an event would be felt throughout much of Southern California, including densely populated areas of metropolitan Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and Tijuana, Baja California. Palm Springs is a famed Riverside County, California, desert resort city, approximately 110 miles east of Los Angeles. ... San Bernardino County is the largest county in the contiguous United States by area, containing more land than each of nine states. ... Riverside County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of California, stretching from Orange County to the Colorado River, which is the border with Arizona. ... Imperial County is a county located in the Imperial Valley, in the far southeast of the U.S. state of California, and borders both Arizona and Mexico. ... Mexicali is the capital of the state of Baja California, Mexico as well as the capital of the municipality of Mexicali. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Tijuana (Spanish [tixwana], English usually [ËŒtiːəˈwÉ‘nÉ™]), is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California and the seat of the municipality of Tijuana. ... Baja California (literally lower California in Spanish) is the northernmost state of Mexico. ...


"All this data suggests that the fault is ready for the next big earthquake but exactly when the triggering will happen and when the earthquake will occur we cannot tell," Fialko said. "It could be tomorrow or it could be 10 years or more from now," he concluded.


Notable earthquakes

The San Andreas Fault has had some notable earthquakes in historic times: Global earthquake epicenters, 1963&#8211;1998. ...

  • 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake — 350 kilometers were ruptured in central and southern California. Though it is known as the Fort Tejon earthquake, the epicenter is thought to have been located far to the north, just south of Parkfield. Only two deaths were reported. The magnitude was about 8.0
  • 1906 San Francisco Earthquake — 430 kilometers were ruptured in Northern California. The epicenter was near San Francisco. About 3000 people died in the earthquake and subsequent fires. This time the magnitude was estimated to be 7.8.
  • 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake — 40 kilometers were ruptured (although the rupture did not reach the surface) near Santa Cruz, California, causing 63 deaths and moderate damage in certain vulnerable locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Magnitude this time was about 7.1. The earthquake also postponed game 3 of the 1989 World Series at Candlestick Park.
  • 2004 Parkfield earthquake — on 28th September 2004 at quarter past 10 in the morning, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck California on the San Andreas Fault. This earthquake was originally expected in 1993 based on the latest earthquake prediction theories of the time. Eleven years passed before this prediction finally came to pass. Despite the extra time between events the magnitude of the earthquake was no larger than originally expected.
See also: List of earthquakes

The Fort Tejon earthquake occurred on January 9, 1857, with an estimated magnitude of 8. ... The Richter magnitude scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... San Francisco Earthquake of 1906: Ruins in vicinity of Post and Grant Avenue. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake was a major earthquake affecting the greater San Francisco Bay Area of California. ... Dates October 14, 1989–October 28, 1989 MVP Dave Stewart (Oakland) Television network ABC Announcers Al Michaels, Tim McCarver, Jim Palmer Umpires Rich Garcia (AL), Paul Runge (NL), Al Clark (AL), Dutch Rennert (NL), Vic Voltaggio (AL), Eric Gregg (NL) The 1989 World Series was played between the Oakland Athletics... Monster Park (colloquially, The Stick or Candlestick, after its original name of Candlestick Park) is an outdoor sports and entertainment stadium located in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. ... Activity snapshot 35 hours after Sept 28, 2004 large earthquake. ... The following is a list of major earthquakes. ...

The San Andreas Fault in pop culture

  • The television version of the theatrically-released film Earthquake features a prologue about the San Andreas, implying that the fault is responsible for the disaster of the title. There is no mention of the San Andreas fault in the theatrical version of the film.
  • The plot of the original Superman movie had Lex Luthor purchasing massive amounts of land east of the fault and then detonating a nuclear missile at the fault line, causing all land west of the fault to plunge into the sea and turning Luthor's previously purchased barren land into beachfront property.
  • The James Bond movie A View to a Kill saw a plot by villian Max Zorin to set off explosives under the San Andreas and Hayward faults in order to decimate Silicon Valley.
  • The video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, is set in a fictional state named after this fault. Also, what is said to be the fault can be seen running through San Fierro, a fictionalized version of San Francisco.
  • There is a popular misconception, played up in Curt Gentry's part - pop apocalypse, part description of California in the 1960s, Last Days of the Late, Great State of California (1968) (and, hints Gentry's book, by Edgar Cayce before then), that, eventually, a portion of California will break away from the continental U.S. at the fault, or drop below sea level. This is not true; it would be more correct to say the land west of the fault will move northwest, because the fault is a transform fault (the two land masses are sliding by each other, not moving apart), at least in the short term, and the lighter crustal rocks "float" on the denser underlying basalts. Some misconstruction may come from the term continental shelf for shallow offshore regions, which do not at all resemble a common cantilever shelf. (Part of the grounds for the misconception may come from pre-plate tectonics geology, in which some theorists characterized lands as rising or falling in orogenies, without continental drift.)
  • The aforementioned misconception has been referenced by Bill Hicks' album, Arizona Bay, the Tool song, Ænema, the Presidents of the United States of America song, "Naked and Famous" the Warren Zevon song, "Desperadoes Under the Eaves", and the Steely Dan song "My Old School." The 1968 song "California Shakin' Away" by the one-local-hit group Shango warns listeners to "get ready to tie up the boat in Idaho."
  • The misconception also forms part of the plot of The End of the World, a popular Flash animation.
  • On Duke Nukem 3D games. Duke explored the San Andreas Fault area on the final stages of Episode 1 LA Meltdown on The Abyssis
  • The song "San Andreas Fault" by Natalie Merchant is about the San Andreas fault.
  • In an Animaniacs song about the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the Warners incorrectly claim that the San Andreas Fault was the cause.

Earthquake is a 1974 disaster film that was among several box-office successful disaster films of the 1970s that places a recognizable all-star cast in life and death situations. ... Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Superman Superman, also known as Superman: The Movie, is a 1978 Warner Bros. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... For other uses, see Casino Royale (2006 film). ... For the Ian Fleming short story that inspired the film, see From a View to a Kill. ... Max Zorin is a fictional character in the James Bond film A View to a Kill. ... For recent activity in the region shown on this map see the USGS map for this location. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ... Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is the fifth video game in the Grand Theft Auto series. ... San Fierro, San Andreas is a fictional city based on the real city of San Francisco in the video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. ... Urban Legend is also the name of a 1998 movie. ... Edgar Cayce (March 18, 1877 – January 3, 1945) (pronounced or like Casey) was an American psychic who claimed to channel answers to questions on subjects such as health, astrology, reincarnation, and Atlantis while in trance. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... A transform fault is a geological fault that is a special case of strike-slip faulting which terminates abruptly, at both ends, at a major transverse geological feature. ...  Sediment  Rock  Mantle  The global continental shelf, highlighted in cyan The continental shelf is the extended perimeter of each continent, which is covered during interglacial periods such as the current epoch by relatively shallow seas (known as shelf seas) and gulfs. ... The cantilevered beam (green) projects from its supports (blue), balanced by the structure (red block), which supports the load (red arrow). ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... // Orogeny (Greek for mountain generating) is the process of mountain building, and may be studied as a tectonic structural event, as a geographical event and a chronological event, in that orogenic events cause distinctive structural phenomena and related tectonic activity, affect certain regions of rocks and crust and happen within... Plates in the crust of the earth, according to the plate tectonics theory Continental drift refers to the movement of the Earths continents relative to each other. ... William Melvin Hicks, better known as Bill Hicks, (December 16, 1961 – February 26, 1994), was a controversial American stand-up comedian, satirist and social critic. ... Arizona Bay is an album by comedian Bill Hicks, posthumously released in 1997 through Rykodisc. ... Tool is an American progressive rock band, formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California, when drummer Danny Carey joined the rehearsal of his neighbor, singer Maynard James Keenan, guitarist Adam Jones and bassist Paul dAmour, when nobody else would show up. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Presidents of the United States of America has two meanings. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ... Steely Dan is a Grammy-Award winning American rock band centered on core members Walter Becker and Donald Fagen. ... A Flash animation or Flash cartoon is an animated film which is created using Adobe Flash animation software and often distributed in the . ... Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter developed by 3D Realms and released on January 29, 1996 by Apogee Software, featuring the adventures of Duke Nukem, based on a character that had appeared in earlier platform games by the company: Duke Nukem and Duke Nukem II. // Calander from Duke... Natalie Merchant Natalie Anne OShea Merchant (born October 26, 1963 in Jamestown, New York, USA) is a professional musician. ... Steven Spielberg Presents Animaniacs, usually referred to as the shorter title Animaniacs, is an American animated television series, distributed by Warner Bros. ... The occurred on January 17, 1994 at 4:30:55 AM Pacific Standard Time in the city of Los Angeles, California, falling on in 1994. ...

See also

An earthquake is the result from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Aftershocks are earthquakes in the same region of the mainshock (generally within a few rupture length) but of smaller magnitude and which occur with a pattern that follows Omoris law. ... The Richter magnitude scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... Parkfield is a village in Monterey County, California. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For recent activity in the region shown on this map see the USGS map for this location. ... Seismology (from the Greek seismos = earthquake and logos = word) is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth. ... Seismic retrofitting is the modification of existing structures to make them more resistant to seismic activity, ground motion, or soil failure due to earthquakes. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ... Old fault exposed by roadcut near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. ... The Farallon Trench was an ancient trench on the west coast of North America during the late Cretaceous period. ...

References

  1. ^ Wallace, Robert E.. Present-Day Crustal Movements and the Mechanics of Cyclic Deformation. The San Andreas Fault System, California. Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  2. ^ San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth. USGS Earthquake Hazards Program.
  3. ^ (2006) "Interseismic strain accumulation and the earthquake potential on the southern San Andreas fault System". Nature 441: 968-971. 
  • Collier, Michael (Dec 1, 1999). A Land in Motion. UC Press. ISBN 0-520-21897-3. 
  • Stoffer, Philip W. (2006). Where's the San Andreas fault? A guidebook to tracing the fault on public lands in the San Francisco Bay region. USGS. General Interest Publication 16. 
  • Lynch, David K. (2006). Field Guide to the San Andreas Fault: See and Touch the World's Most Famous Fault on any one of Twelve Easy Day Trips. Thule Scientific. Full color, GPS coordinates, ISBN 0-9779935-0-7. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
A Ton of Interest in Rocks From San Andreas Fault - washingtonpost.com (639 words)
Scientists said yesterday that they have extracted a ton of rock from deep inside California's San Andreas fault, the first time anyone has collected samples from a geologically active fault zone where earthquakes are spawned.
The samples, which are part of the National Science Foundation-funded San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth project, were brought to the surface last month through boreholes.
The San Andreas fault, like most of the especially active ones, is the collision point of two massive and slowly moving tectonic plates -- one underlying the Pacific Ocean and the other bearing the North American continent.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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