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Encyclopedia > Samwise Gamgee
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Samwise Gamgee
Other names Sam
Samwís Gamwich
Samwise Gammidgy
Samwise Gardner
Titles Ring-bearer
Race Hobbit
Culture Shire-hobbit
Date of birth April 6, T.A. 2980[1]
Date of departure to Aman F.A. 62
Date of death Fourth Age
Book(s) The Fellowship of the Ring
The Two Towers
The Return of the King

Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. Tolkien redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... In The Lord of the Rings, by J. R. R. Tolkien, Frodo Baggins is appointed to be the Ring-bearer by the Council of Elrond in Rivendell. ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aman (blessed realm) is a continent that lies to the west of Middle-earth (although it lay in another dimension during the time of The Lord of the Rings), across the great ocean Belegaer. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ...

Contents

Appearances

Middle-earth Portal

Sam is first introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring. As "punishment" for eavesdropping on Gandalf's conversation with Frodo Baggins regarding the dangers of the One Ring, Sam was — at his own request — made Frodo's first companion on his journey to Rivendell. They were joined by Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took, Frodo's cousins. Before they left Frodo's home at Crickhollow, it was revealed that Sam, Merry, Pippin, and Fredegar Bolger had formed "the Conspiracy" to find out what the purpose of Frodo's journey was, and that Sam had been assigned to gather information by eavesdropping. Image File history File links Arda. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings. ... To eavesdrop is to surreptitiously overhear a private conversation. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... “Frodo” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Fredegar Fatty Bolger is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. ...


In Rivendell, Sam eavesdropped again during the Council of Elrond. When he heard that Frodo was to take the Ring to Mordor, he refused to let his master go without him. The two became members of the Fellowship of the Ring, as did Merry and Pippin. In The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, the Council of Elrond is a fictional secret council called by Elrond in Rivendell in order to decide what should be done with the One Ring. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ...


At first, Sam served merely as a good companion, characterised by a pronounced interest in elves and a gift for reciting and composing poetry. However, as the books progressed, he was often more valuable to Frodo than experienced warriors. When Frodo decided to leave the rest of the Fellowship, Sam refused to give up his responsibilities as a companion, protector, and friend. While his general bearing and speech patterns were deceptively simple, Sam frequently displayed great perception and understanding. As Frodo determined to sneak away from everyone else, Sam quickly caught on. Finding Frodo, he insisted on being allowed to accompany him. He carried most of the luggage, cooked, kept watch at night whenever he could, and rationed the food so Frodo had enough for the journey. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ...


In The Two Towers, he and Frodo encountered Gollum, who had once possessed the Ring and would do anything to get it back. Sam took an instant dislike of the creature, and warned Frodo that "Stinker", as he called Gollum, was not to be trusted. Sam's suspicions were proven correct when Gollum led them to the lair of the monstrous spider Shelob. She attacked and seemingly killed Frodo. After a long struggle, Sam took the Ring, intending to complete the quest himself, yet his love for Frodo and his "one wish" to find him again made it almost impossible to follow this choice. Because he held the Ring during this time, he was considered one of the Ring-bearers. When he heard from the Orc Shagrat that Frodo was merely temporarily paralysed, he turned back at once to rescue Frodo from the top of the Tower of Cirith Ungol, where the Orcs had taken him. The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Shelob is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional works of Middle-earth. ... In The Lord of the Rings, by J. R. R. Tolkien, Frodo Baggins is appointed to be the Ring-bearer by the Council of Elrond in Rivendell. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... Paralysed redirects here. ... For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ...


In The Return of the King, Sam rescued Frodo, returning the Ring to him, and accompanied him into Mordor. There was little food or water, and the two hobbits were forced close to starvation while making the journey across Gorgoroth. Safe passage across the plains was partly ensured because the forces of Mordor were lured to the Black Gate by Aragorn and Gandalf. The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The stories of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium contain references to numerous places. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


As they moved deeper into Mordor, the temptation of the Ring started becoming too much for Frodo. Against his own will, Frodo felt compelled to put on the Ring, and Sam had to keep him from giving in to temptation. When Frodo had no will left to go any further, Sam struggled to carry Frodo up Mount Doom. At the volcano's rim, Gollum attacked. At this moment Sam had a chance to kill Gollum, but was overcome with pity and let him go. Sam's pity and the intervention of fate eventually fulfilled the quest moments later, as Gollum took the Ring from Frodo (who had been overpowered at last and claimed it for himself) and fell into the lava of Mount Doom. The mountain erupted, and Sam and Frodo were able to climb far enough away for Gandalf and the Eagles of Manwë to rescue them. // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... For other uses, see Destiny (disambiguation). ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ...


After the hobbits' return home and the Battle of Bywater, Sam travelled the length and breadth of the Shire replanting trees that had been cut down during Saruman's brief reign of terror. He used the gift of earth given to him by the Lady Galadriel, which caused the saplings he planted to grow at an accelerated rate. The earth remaining after he had completed his plantings he took to the Three-Farthing Stone (roughly the centre of the Shire) and cast into the air, prompting the bountiful period of growth starting in the spring of the year 1420 (Shire Reckoning). The greatest wonder was a young mallorn tree sprouting in the Party Field: "the only mallorn west of the Mountains and east of the Sea". Combatants Hobbits of The Shire Ruffians in the service of Saruman Commanders Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took Ruffian chief†, Saruman†, Wormtongue† Strength 200 local Hobbits of the Shire under Meriadoc Brandybuck, including Tolman Cotton and Samwise Gamgee, and 110 Tooks from Tookland under Peregrin Took slightly over 200 Casualties 19... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... The Three-Farthing stone was a boundary marker in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional land where hobbits dwelt, called the Shire. ... The Shire Calendar was a calendar used in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth by the Hobbits of Shire. ...


After the War of the Ring, Sam married Rose "Rosie" Cotton and moved to Bag End with Frodo. Sam and Rosie had thirteen children: Elanor the Fair, Frodo, Rose, Merry, Pippin, Goldilocks, Hamfast, Daisy, Primrose, Bilbo, Ruby, Robin, and Tolman. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Hobbits are a fictional race related to Men. ... Bag End, as it is represented in a Lord of the Rings computer game. ... Elanor Gamgee, also known as Elanor the Fair, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium. ...


After Sam and Rose's first child was born it was revealed that Frodo would leave Middle-earth, along with Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf and most of the remaining Elves, for the Undying Lands, an Elven paradise. Before Frodo left, he gave the estate of Bag End to Sam, as well as the Red Book of Westmarch for Sam to continue, hinting that Sam, too, might be allowed to travel into the West eventually. Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... In the fictional writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Undying Lands are a realm inhabited by immortal beings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... Fictional book in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


The Appendix of The Return of the King says that in F.A. 7 (S.R. 1427), Sam was elected Mayor of the Shire for the first of seven consecutive seven-year terms. The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... The Shire Calendar was a calendar used in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth by the Hobbits of Shire. ...


After the death of his wife in the year 62 of the Fourth Age (Shire Reckoning 1482), Sam entrusted the Red Book to Elanor and left the Shire. He was not seen again in Middle-earth, but Elanor and her descendants preserved the tradition that he went to the Grey Havens and sailed into the West. As a Ring-bearer, he was entitled to sail across the Sea and be reunited with Frodo in the Undying Lands. The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... The Shire Calendar was a calendar used in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth by the Hobbits of Shire. ...


Concept and creation

Name

Tolkien took the name from a colloquial word in Birmingham for cotton wool. This was in turn derived from Gamgee Tissue, a surgical dressing invented by a 19th century Birmingham surgeon named Joseph Sampson Gamgee. Tolkien originally used it as a nickname for a man living in Lamorna Cove, England before adapting it into his stories: Gamgee Tissue is a surgical dressing invented by Dr. Joseph Sampson Gamgee in Birmingham, England, in 1880. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the British city. ... Dr Joseph Sampson Gamgee (born 17 April 1828, Livorno, Italy; died 18 September 1886) was a surgeon at the Queens Hospital (later the General Hospital) in Birmingham, England. ...

"There was a curious local character, an old man who used to go about swapping gossip and weather-wisdom and such like. To amuse my children I named him Gaffer Gamgee... The choice of Gamgee was primarily directed by alliteration; but I did not invent it. It was caught out of childhood memory, as a comic word or name. It was in fact the name when I was small (in Birmingham) for 'cotton-wool'. (Hence the association of the Gamgees with the Cottons.) I knew nothing of its origin." (The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien #257, ed. Humphrey Carpenter) The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and the biographer Humphrey Carpenter. ...

Tolkien claimed to be genuinely surprised when, in March 1956, he received a letter from one Sam Gamgee, who had heard that his name was in The Lord of the Rings but had not read the book. Tolkien replied on March 18: March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"Dear Mr. Gamgee,

It was very kind of you to write. You can imagine my astonishment when I saw your signature! I can only say, for your comfort, I hope, that the 'Sam Gamgee' of my story is a most heroic character, now widely beloved by many readers, even though his origins are rustic. So that perhaps you will not be displeased at the coincidence of the name of this imaginary character of supposedly many centuries ago being the same as yours." (The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, ed. Humphrey Carpenter)

He sent Gamgee a signed copy of all three volumes of the book. However, the incident sparked a nagging worry in Tolkien's mind, as he recorded in his journal:

"For some time I lived in fear of receiving a letter signed 'S. Gollum'. That would have been more difficult to deal with." (Tolkien: A Biography, Humphrey Carpenter)

After publication of The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien traced the origin of the name back to Gamgee and eventually the earlier English surname 'de Gamaches'.


In the appendices of The Lord of the Rings, it is mentioned that the Westron form of Sam's name is Banazîr Galbasi (also spelled Galpsi). Banazîr comes from elements meaning "halfwise" or "simple". Galbasi comes from the name of the village Galabas. The name Galabas uses the elements galab-, meaning "game", and bas-, corresponding somewhat to "-wich" or "-wick". Tolkien's English translation, Samwís Gamwich, could have been corrupted as Samwise Gammidgy and eventually come to Samwise Gamgee in modern English. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Westron or Common Speech is the closest thing to a universal language, at least at the time during which The Lord of the Rings is set. ...


Commentary

Tolkien called Samwise Gamgee the "chief hero" of the saga in one of his letters: he places special emphasis on Sam's "rustic love" for Rosie, [3] a union that serves to establish a family in which allusions to Elvish wonders (embodied in Sam's daughter Elanor) are combined with the best qualities of traditional Shire-life. Sam and his descendants also become the keepers of the Ring-war history and uphold the memory of events that most 'ordinary' hobbits take little interest in. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


The quest to destroy the Ring only succeeds because of Sam, who repeatedly saves Frodo from disaster (such as rescuing him at Cirith Ungol and carrying him up Mount Doom). He is one of four Ring-bearers strong enough to surrender the Ring voluntarily; the others being Bilbo Baggins and Frodo Baggins - the latter having surrendered the Ring at the Council of Elrond before accepting the Ring quest. For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... “Frodo” redirects here. ...


The relationship between Frodo and Sam is, in many respects, at the centre of The Lord of the Rings. A strong bond of love and trust grows between them, portrayed most poignantly during the events of Cirith Ungol, where Sam vows to return to his (apparently) dead master, to be reunited with Frodo in death.


One branch of Tolkienologists compares Sam to the British batman of the First World War. In the British Army, a batman was an orderly who acted as the personal servant of an officer. It was a role with which Tolkien (who served as an Army officer in the First World War) would have been familiar. Sam undertakes the typical roles of a batman — he runs errands, he cooks, he transports Frodo (or at least carries him) and he occasionally carries his luggage. Tolkien confirmed this interpretation when he wrote in a private letter that: The works of J. R. R. Tolkien have generated a body of academic research, studying different facets such as Tolkien as a writer of fantasy literature Tolkiens invented languages As A Writer Splintered Light: Logos And Language In Tolkiens World Verlyn Flieger (1st Edition 1983, Revised Edition 2002... A batman is a soldier assigned to a commissioned officer as a personal servant. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

"My Sam Gamgee is indeed a reflexion of the English soldier, of the privates and batmen I knew in the 1914 war, and recognised as so far superior to myself" (The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, ed. Humphrey Carpenter). “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

However, it is equally obvious that Sam's abilities and qualities by far exceed the typical required virtues of a batman, just as his bond with Frodo extends beyond 'military' duties and attachments. The most apparent differences are Frodo's and Sam's shared interest in Elvish traditions (distinguishing them from the majority of hobbits) and their equally shared aesthetic sensibilities for poetry and song, which paves the way for their joint authorship of the Ring-history, the 'source text' for The Lord of the Rings. A batman is a soldier assigned to a commissioned officer as a personal servant. ...


Portrayal in adaptations

Film

In Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings, Sam was voiced by Michael Scholes. Billy Barty was the model for Sam, as well as Frodo and Bilbo, in the live-action recordings Bakshi used for rotoscoping. Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ... Rotoscoping is a technique where animators trace live action movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ...


In the 1980 animated version of The Return of the King, made for television, the character was voiced by Roddy McDowall. DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998) was an English/American actor. ...


In the Peter Jackson movies The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), Sam was played by Sean Astin. For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... Sean Astin (born Sean Patrick Duke[1] on February 25, 1971 in Santa Monica, California) is a film actor, director, and Oscar-nominated producer best known for his film roles as Mikey Walsh in The Goonies, the title character of Rudy, Samwise Gamgee in the Lord of the Rings trilogy...


Stage

(See the stage article: The Lord of the Rings) This article is about the musicals. ...


On stage, Sam was portrayed by Peter Howe in the 3-hour long Toronto, Canada stage production of The Lord of the Rings, which opened in 2006. In the United States, Sam was portrayed by Blake Bowden in the Cincinnati productions of The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002), and The Return of the King (2003) for Clear Stage Cincinnati. In Chicago, Dale Inghram played Sam in the Lifeline Theatre production of The Two Towers in 1999. Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Clear Stage Cincinnati Founded in 2003, Clear Stage Cincinnati is a professional theatre company in Cincinnati, Ohio dedicated to developing and showcasing fresh new theatrical artists by providing them with a Clear Stage for the advancement of their craft. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Lifeline Theatre was founded in Chicago, Illinois, United States, in 1983 by four Northwestern University graduates. ...


Radio

In the 1981 BBC radio serial of The Lord of the Rings, Sam was played by Bill Nighy. It is not clear whether Sean Astin, who played Sam in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, had heard Nighy's radio performance, but both actors bring very similar characterisations and accents to the role. It is a possibility that both may come from Tolkien's own version from his audio readings. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... Bill Nighy (IPA: ; born December 12, 1949) is a Golden Globe and BAFTA-award winning English actor. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ...


References

  1. ^ The date of Sam's birth in "The Longfather-Tree of Master Samwise" (Appendix C) is S.R. 1380 (equivalent to T.A. 2980), however, "The Tale of Years" (Appendix B) gives it as T.A. 2983, which is incorrect. In S.R. 1476, Sam is said to have been ninety-six years old, so 2980 is more correct than 2983. Also, the birth year of his sister, Marigold, is given S.R. 1383 (T.A. 2893), and it is most unlikely that they were born in the same year. In the Fellowship of the Ring, Merry and Pippin is said to be younger than both Sam and Frodo, so Sam's birth year must be in T.A. 2980, since Merry was born in T.A. 2982.
  2. ^ Appendix C to The Lord of the Rings
  3. ^ In the long summary-letter sent to Milton Waldman, an extract of which was published in the Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien as #131 and was reproduced in its entirety in The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion. It read "I think the simple 'rustic' love of Sam and his Rosie (nowhere elaborated) is absolutely essential to the study of his (the chief hero's) character, and to the theme of the relation of ordinary life (breathing, eating, working, begetting) and quests, sacrifice, causes, and the 'longing for Elves', and sheer beauty." - J.R.R Tolkien letter dated 1951

The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by Tolkiens biographer Humphrey Carpenter assisted by Christopher Tolkien. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Samwise Gamgee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2043 words)
Sean Astin portrays Samwise Gamgee in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
April 6, 2980 T.A. Samwise Gamgee (T.A. sometime after 61), commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character in J.
This was in turn derived from Gamgee Tissue, a surgical dressing invented by a 19th century Birmingham surgeon named Joseph Sampson Gamgee.
Gamgee Family (4524 words)
Elanor Gamgee was born on March 25, 3021, on the anniversary of the destruction of the One Ring and the downfall of Sauron.
Gamgee is an English surname and also a name for "cotton-wool," named after an English surgeon who invented "Gamgee tissue." Tolkien remembered the name from his childhood near Birmingham and used it to relate the Gamgee family to the Cotton family.
Frodo Gamgee, born in the year 2 of the Fourth Age, was the second child and eldest son of Sam and Rose Cotton Gamgee.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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