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Encyclopedia > Samuel Southard
U.S. Navy collection portrait of Samuel Southard
U.S. Navy collection portrait of Samuel Southard

Samuel Lewis Southard (1787-1842) (son of Henry Southard and brother of Isaac Southard) was a prominent U.S. statesman of the early 1800's, serving as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, and Governor of New Jersey. Samuel L. Southard http://www. ... Henry Southard, (father of Isaac Southard and Samuel Lewis Southard), a Representative from New Jersey; born in Hempstead, Long Island, N.Y., October 7, 1747; moved with his parents to Basking Ridge, N.J., in 1755; attended the common schools and worked on a farm; served as a private and... Isaac Southard, (son of Henry Southard and brother of Samuel Lewis Southard), a Representative from New Jersey; born in Basking Ridge, Somerset County, N.J., August 30, 1783; educated at the classical school of his native city; engaged in the general merchandise business until 1814; appointed deputy collector of internal... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ...


Southard was born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, on 9 June 1787, and graduated from Princeton in 1804. After teaching school in New Jersey, he worked for several years as a tutor in Virginia and studied at law there. Upon being admitted to the bar, he returned to New Jersey, where he was appointed law reporter by the legislature in 1814. Elected to the State Assembly in 1815, Southard was appointed to the State Supreme Court shortly thereafter, and in 1820 served as a presidential elector. In 1821, he was chosen to fill the seat in the United States Senate, vacated by the resignation of James J. Wilson, and served until March of 1823. During this time, he was a member of the committee that produced the Missouri Compromise. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the eight Ivy League universities, and is widely recognized as one of the most prestigious institutions in the world. ... The Legislature of New Jersey is the U.S. state of New Jerseys legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Trenton. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The Missouri Compromise, also called the Compromise of 1820, was an agreement passed in 1820 between the pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States, involving primarily the regulation of slavery in the western territories. ...


President James Monroe selected Senator Southard to be Secretary of the Navy in September 1823, and he remained in office under President John Quincy Adams. During these years, he also served briefly as ad interim Secretary of the Treasury (1825) and Secretary of War (1828). Southard proved to be one of the most effective of the Navy's early Secretaries. He endeavored to enlarge the Navy and improve its administration, purchased land for the first Naval Hospitals, began construction of the first Navy dry docks, undertook surveys of U.S. coastal waters and promoted exploration in the Pacific Ocean. Responding to actions by influential officers, including David Porter, he reinforced the American tradition of civilian control over the military establishment. Also on Southard's "watch", the Navy grew by some fifty percent in personnel and expenditures and expanded its reach into waters that had not previously seen an American man-of-war. Order: 5th President Vice President: Daniel D. Tompkins Term of office: March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1825 Preceded by: James Madison Succeeded by: John Quincy Adams Date of birth: April 28, 1758 Place of birth: Westmoreland County, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1831 Place of death: New York City... Order: 6th President Vice President: John Caldwell Calhoun Term of office: March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... David Porter (February 1, 1780 – March 3, 1843) was an officer in the United States Navy and later the commander-in-chief of the Mexican Navy. ...


In 1829, after leaving his Navy post, Samuel Southard became Attorney General of New Jersey. After briefly serving as that state's Governor in 1832-33, he re-entered the U.S. Senate. During the next decade, he was a leader of the Whig Party and a figure of national political importance. Failing health forced his resignation from the Senate in 1842. Samuel Southard died in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on 26 June of that year. The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Fredericksburg is an independent city in the U.S. state of Virginia, 50 miles south of Washington, D.C., and 55 miles north of Richmond, Virginia. ...


The destroyer USS Southard (DD-207), (later DMS-10), 1919-1946, was named in honor of Secretary of the Navy Samuel Southard.


Sources


The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

Preceded by:
Smith Thompson
United States Secretary of the Navy
18231829
Succeeded by:
John Branch
Preceded by:
Peter Dumont Vroom
Governor of New Jersey
18321833
Succeeded by:
Elias P. Seeley
Preceded by:
James J. Wilson
United States Senator from New Jersey
18211823
Succeeded by:
Joseph McIlvaine
Preceded by:
Mahlon Dickerson
United States Senator from New Jersey
18331842
Succeeded by:
William L. Dayton


Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Events July 15 - San Paolo fuori le Mura church in Rome almost completely destroyed by fire September 10 - Peru December 2 - US President James Monroe delivers a speech to the U.S. Congress, announcing a new policy of forbidding European interference in the Americas and establishing American neutrality in future... Events January 8 - Hanging of body-selling murderer William Burke - his associate William Hare, who testified against him, is released January 19 - Johann Wolfgang von Goethes Faust premieres March 4 - Andrew Jackson succeeds John Quincy Adams as the President of the United States of America. ... Gov. ... This is a list of governors of New Jersey. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Events January 3, Britain seizes control of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic. ... James Jefferson Wilson, (1775-1824) served New Jersey as a U.S. Senator from 1815 to 1821. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from New Jersey to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Events February 23 - The Philadelphia College of Apothecaries founds the first pharmacy college. ... Events July 15 - San Paolo fuori le Mura church in Rome almost completely destroyed by fire September 10 - Peru December 2 - US President James Monroe delivers a speech to the U.S. Congress, announcing a new policy of forbidding European interference in the Americas and establishing American neutrality in future... U.S. Navy collection portrait of Mahlon Dickerson Mahlon Dickerson (April 17, 1770–October 5, 1853) was an American judge and politician. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from New Jersey to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Events January 3, Britain seizes control of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic. ... Events February 21 - John J. Greenough patents the sewing machine. ... William Lewis Dayton (February 17, 1807 – December 1, 1864) was an American lawyer from Freehold Borough, New Jersey. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Samuel L. Southard Papers, 1783-1893 (bulk 1802-1846): Finding Aid (2919 words)
Born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, in 1787, Samuel Lewis Southard was the son of Henry Southard, a two-time member of Congress from New Jersey.
The Southard Papers were purchased for Princeton University Library in 1957 through the generosity of Albert Southard Wright class of 1900, Peter H. Frelinghuysen class of 1904, Carl Otto Von Kienbusch class of 1906, and Sterling Morton class of 1906.
Southard also communicated with such prominent New Jerseyans as Mahlon Dickerson, Charles Ewing, Samuel Miller, Aaron Ogden, William Pennington, and Richard Stockton, son of the signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Samuel L. Southard Papers Finding Aid (961 words)
Samuel Lewis Southard (1787-1842) was born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, the son of Henry Southard, twice a member of Congress from New Jersey.
Southard's tenure as Secretary of the Navy, his major federal appointment, which he held from 1823 to 1829, is reflected throughout his correspondence for those years, although how fully his papers document naval affairs in an important way has not as yet been determined.
Southard, however, has been accredited by historians with having made several farsighted recommendations in naval matters; in part these related to coastal surveys, the proper location of naval bases, reorganization of the marine Corps, the establishment of a naval academy, and the establishment of federal naval hospitals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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