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Encyclopedia > Samuel Smith (Maryland)
Samuel Smith
Samuel Smith

Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. The Media:United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 145 km 400 km 21 37°53N to 39°43N 75°4W to 79°33W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165... Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Map Location in Maryland Political Statistics Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Martin...


Born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Smith moved with his family to Baltimore, Maryland in 1759. He attended a private academy, and engaged in mercantile pursuits until the American Revolutionary War, at which time he served as captain, major, and lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army. After the War, Smith engaged in the shipping business. Motto: Nickname: Map [[Image:|px|Location of Carlisle, Pennsylvania]] Political Statistics Founded 1751 Incorporated 1782 County Cumberland County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Water 14. ... Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Map Location in Maryland Political Statistics Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Martin... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France,Netherlands, allies British Empire, allies Commanders George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Nathanael Greene William Howe Henry Clinton Charles Cornwallis Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties {{{casualties1}}} {{{casualties2}}} The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War for Independence, was the military side of the American... The Continental Army was the unified command structure of the thirteen colonies fighting Great Britain during the American Revolutionary War. ...


From 1790 to 1792, Smith was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates. At the time of the threatened war with France in 1794, he was appointed brigadier general of the Maryland Militia and commanded Maryland’s quota during the Whiskey Rebellion. Smith served as a Major General of Maryland Militia during the War of 1812, and commanded the defenses of Baltimore during the Battle of Baltimore and Fort McHenry in 1814. The American victory there can largely be attributed to Smith's preparation for the British invasion. 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Maryland House of Delegates is the lower house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Whiskey Rebellion was an uprising that had its origins in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the Monongahela Valley in western Pennsylvania by Appalachian settlers who fought against a federal tax on liquor and distilled drinks. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and British Empire from 1812 to 1815, on land in North America and at sea around the world. ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders Robert Ross† Alexander Cochrane Arthur Brooke Samuel Smith John Stricker George Armistead Strength 5,000 15,000 (Baltimore defenses) 1,000 (Fort McHenry garrison) Casualties 46 dead, 300 wounded 310 killed or wounded In the Battle of Baltimore, one of the turning points in the... Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Smith entered into national politics when he was elected to the Third Congress, serving from March 4, 1793 until March 3, 1803. As a congressman, Smith served as chairman of the Committee on Commerce and Manufactures (Fifth through Seventh Congresses). Smith entered into the senate race in 1802, and was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the United States Senate. He was re-elected in 1808 and served from March 4, 1803 until March 3, 1815. While senator, Smith served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Ninth and Tenth Congresses. March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... --69. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Senate, according to the United States Constitution, (Article I), is required to choose a President Pro Tempore (or, president for a time, often shortened to President Pro Tem), who presides over the Senate in the absence of the Vice President. ...


Smith was elected to the Fourteenth Congress on January 31, 1816 to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Nicholas R. Moore, and was re-elected to the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Congresses. In the House, Smith served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Treasury (Fourteenth Congress), and as a member of the Committee on Ways and Means (Fifteenth through Seventeenth Congresses). January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


On December 17, 1822, Smith resigned as congressman, having been elected as a Democratic Republican (later Crawford Republican and Jacksonian) to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William Pinkney. Smith served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Twentieth and Twenty-first Congresses, and as chairman of the Committee on Finance (Eighteenth and Twentieth through Twenty-second Congresses). He was re-elected in 1826 and served until March 3, 1833. Two years later, in 1835, Smith became mayor of Baltimore, and served in that position until 1838, when he retired from public life. Smith died in Baltimore in 1839, and is interred in the Old Westminster Burying Ground. December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William Pinkney William Pinkney (March 17, 1764–February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and the seventh U.S. Attorney General. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... 1826 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Here is a list of mayors that have served the city of Baltimore, Maryland. ... Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


References

Preceded by:
William V. Murray
U.S. Congressman, Maryland's 5th District
1793—1803
Succeeded by:
Nicholas R. Moore and William McCreery
Preceded by:
John E. Howard
Class 1 U.S. Senator from Maryland
1803—1815
Succeeded by:
Robert G. Harper
Preceded by:
Joseph Anderson
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
December 2, 1805November 6, 1808
Succeeded by:
Stephen R. Bradley
Preceded by:
Nicholas R. Moore
U.S. Congressman, Maryland's 5th District
1816—1822
Succeeded by:
Isaac McKim
Preceded by:
William Pinkney
Class 1 U.S. Senator from Maryland
1822—1833
Succeeded by:
Joseph Kent
Preceded by:
Nathaniel Macon
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
May 15, 1828December 11, 1831
Succeeded by:
Littleton Waller Tazewell
Preceded by:
Jesse Hunt
Mayor of Baltimore
1835–1838
Succeeded by:
Sheppard C. Leakin
Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate Seal of the United States Senate President Pro Tempore
Langdon | Lee | Langdon | Izard | H Tazewell | Livermore | Bingham | Bradford | Read | Sedgwick | Laurance | Ross | Livermore | Tracy | Howard | Hillhouse | Baldwin | Bradley | Brown | Franklin | Anderson | Smith | Bradley | Milledge | Gregg | Gaillard | Pope | Crawford | Varnum | Gaillard | Barbour | Gaillard | Macon | Smith | L Tazewell | White | Poindexter | Tyler | W R King | Southard | Mangum | Sevier | Atchison | W R King | Atchison | Cass | Bright | Stuart | Bright | Mason | Rusk | Fitzpatrick | Bright | Fitzpatrick | Foot | Clark | Foster | Wade | Anthony | Carpenter | Anthony | Ferry | Thurman | Bayard | Davis | Edmunds | Sherman | Ingalls | Manderson | Ransom | Harris | Frye | (Special: Bacon, Curtis, Gallinger, Brandegee, Lodge) | Clarke | Saulsbury | Cummins | Moses | Pittman | W H King | Harrison | Glass | McKellar | Vandenberg | McKellar | Bridges | George | Hayden | Russell | Ellender | Eastland | Magnuson | Young | Magnuson | Thurmond | Stennis | Byrd | Thurmond | Byrd | Thurmond | Byrd | Stevens

 
 

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