FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Samuel Palmer
Self-portrait of the young Samuel Palmer, circa 1826.
Self-portrait of the young Samuel Palmer, circa 1826.
Garden in Shoreham. 1820s or early 1830s.
Garden in Shoreham. 1820s or early 1830s.
A Cornfield by Moonlight with the Evening Star. Watercolour with bodycolour and pen and ink c.1830
A Cornfield by Moonlight with the Evening Star. Watercolour with bodycolour and pen and ink c.1830
A Dream in the Appenine (c.1864).
A Dream in the Appenine (c.1864).
The Lonely Tower. Etching, State V. 1869
The Lonely Tower. Etching, State V. 1869

Samuel Palmer (born Newington, London, January 27, 1805 - died Redhill, Surrey, May 24, 1881) was an English landscape painter, etcher and printmaker. He was also a prolific writer. Palmer was a key figure in English Romanticism and produced visionary pastoral paintings. Image File history File links The face of Samuel Palmer, famous English artist. ... Image File history File links The face of Samuel Palmer, famous English artist. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1264, 220 KB) Description: Title: de: Garten in Shoreham Technique: de: Wasserfarben und Gouache Dimensions: de: 28 × 22 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Victoria and Albert Museum Other notes: de... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1264, 220 KB) Description: Title: de: Garten in Shoreham Technique: de: Wasserfarben und Gouache Dimensions: de: 28 × 22 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Victoria and Albert Museum Other notes: de... Shoreham is a village and civil parish in the valley of the River Darent six miles north of Sevenoaks in Kent: it is in the District of Sevenoaks. ... Image File history File links A Cornfield by Moonlight with the Evening Star by Samuel Palmer. ... Image File history File links A Cornfield by Moonlight with the Evening Star by Samuel Palmer. ... Image File history File links An example of Samuel Palmers later work: A Dream in the Appenine (c. ... Image File history File links An example of Samuel Palmers later work: A Dream in the Appenine (c. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x1398, 3702 KB) Summary The Lonely Tower (1879) by Samuel Palmer. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x1398, 3702 KB) Summary The Lonely Tower (1879) by Samuel Palmer. ... Newington is a place in the London Borough of Southwark. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Redhill is a town in the borough of Reigate and Banstead, Surrey, England and is part of the London commuter belt. ... This article is about the English county. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Landscape art depicts scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Etching is an intaglio method of printmaking in which the image is incised into the surface of a metal plate using an acid. ... Printmaking is a process for producing a work of art in ink; the work (called a print) is created indirectly, through the transfer of ink from the surface upon which the work was originally drawn or otherwise composed. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe, during the Industrial Revolution. ...

Contents

Early life

Palmer, who was born in a street off the Old Kent Road, London, was the son of a bookseller and sometime Baptist minister, and was raised by a pious nurse. Palmer painted churches from around age twelve, and first exhibited Turner-inspired works at the Royal Academy at the age of fourteen. He had little formal training, and did not have a formal schooling. Old Kent Road is a road in south London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist... J. M. W. Turner, English landscape painter The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839. ... The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London, England. ...


The Shoreham years

Through John Linnell, he met William Blake in 1824. Blake's influence can be seen in the works he produced over the next ten years or so, which are generally reckoned to be his greatest. These works were of landscapes around Shoreham, near Sevenoaks in the north of the county of Kent. He purchased a run-down cottage, nicknamed "Rat Abbey", and it was there that he lived from 1826 to 1835, depicting the area as a demi-paradise, mysterious and visionary, and often shown in sepia shades under moon and star light. There Palmer also associated with the group of Blake-influenced artists known as The Ancients (including George Richmond and Edward Calvert). They were among the few who ever saw the Shoreham paintings since, as a result of attacks by critics in 1825, he only ever opened those early portfolios to selected friends. John Linnell (June 16, 1792 - January 20, 1882) was an English landscape painter. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... Shoreham is a village and civil parish in the valley of the River Darent six miles north of Sevenoaks in Kent: it is in the District of Sevenoaks. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... The Ancients, or Shoreham Ancients, were a group of English artists who admired and followed the work of William Blake in the 1820s and 1830s The group, comprised of George Richmond, Samuel Palmer and Edward Calvert, gathered regularly at the home of Palmer. ... George Richmond (1809 - 1896) was an English painter. ... Edward Calvert (1799 - 1883) was an English engraver and painter. ...


Palmer's somewhat disreputable father – Samuel Palmer senior – also moved to the area, his brother Nathaniel having offered him an allowance that would "make him a gentlemen" and so restore the good name of the family. Samuel Palmer senior rented half of the Queen Anne-era 'Waterhouse' which still stands by the River Darent at Shoreham and is now given the slightly grander-sounding name of 'Water House'. Palmer's nurse, Mary Ward, and his other son William joined him there. The Waterhouse was used to accommodate overflow guests from "Rat Alley". In 1828 Samuel Palmer left "Rat Abbey" to join his father at Water House. He lived there for the rest of his time in Shoreham. Later in the Shoreham period he fell in love with the fourteen year old Hannah Linnell, who he would later marry. The City of Wakefield MDCs Queen Anne style administrative HQ, County Hall, James Gibson and Samuel Russell, architects (1894-98) The Queen Anne Style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways... The confluence of the River Darent (left) and the River Cray (right) on Crayford Marshes. ...


Mature life

After returning to London in 1835, and using a small legacy to purchase a house there in Marylebone, Palmer produced less mystical and more conventional work. Part of his reason in returning to London was to better sell his work and earn money from private teaching. He had better health on his return to London, and he was recently married to Hannah daughter of John Linnell. He had known Hannah since she was a child, and when they married she was nineteen, he thirty-two. He sketched in Devonshire and Wales at around this time. His peaceful vision of rural England had been disillusioned by the violent rural discontent of the early 1830s, his small financial legacy was running out, and so he decided that he needed to produce work which was more in line with public taste if he was to earn an income for himself and his wife. In this he was also following the advice of his father-in-law. Linnell, who had earlier shown a remarkable understanding of the uniqueness of Blake's genius, was not as generous with his son-in-law, towards whom his attitude was authoritarian and often harsh. Palmer began to turn more to watercolour, then gaining great popularity in England. To further a commercial career, in 1837 the couple embarked on a two-year honeymoon to Italy, made possible by money from Hannah's parents. In Italy Palmer's palette became brighter, sometimes to the point of garishness, but he made many fine sketches and studies that would later be useful in producing new paintings. Yet, on his return to London, Palmer sought patrons with only limited success. For more than two decades was obliged to work as a private drawing master, until he moved away from London in 1862. To add to his financial worries, he had returned to London to find that his dissolute brother William had pawned all of his early paintings, and Samuel was obliged to pay a large sum to redeem them. By all accounts Samuel was an excellent teacher, but the work with uninspired students inevitably reduced the time he could devote to his own art. Marylebone (sometimes written St. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... This article is about the country. ... The Swing Riots were a widespread uprising by the rural workers of the arable south and east of England in 1830. ... John Linnell (June 16, 1792 - January 20, 1882) was an English landscape painter. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... A honeymoon is the traditional trip taken by newlyweds to celebrate their marriage with seclusion and sexual intimacy. ... Modern pawnbroker storefront A Pawnbroker is a person who offers loans to individuals who use their personal property as collateral. ...


The later work

From the early 1860s he gained some measure of critical success for his later landscapes, which once again had a touch of the early Shoreham work about them – most notable of these is the etching of The Lonely Tower (1879). He had become a full member of the Water Colour Society in 1854, and its annual show gave him a yearly goal to work towards. The Royal Watercolour Society is an English institution of painters working in watercolours. ...


His best late works include a series of large watercolours illustrating Milton's poems L’allegro and Il Penseroso and his etchings, a medium in which he worked from 1850 onwards, including a set illustrating Virgil. For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Il Penseroso is a famous pastoral poem by Milton, written in 1633. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ...


Palmer's later years were darkened by the death in 1861, at the age of 19, of his beloved elder son Thomas More Palmer – a devastating blow from which the father never fully recovered. He lived in various places later in his life, including a small cottage and then an unaffordable villa both at Kensington, then a cottage at Reigate. But it was only when a small measure of financial security came his way at last, that was he able to move to Furze Hill House in Redhill, Surrey, from 1862. Nevertheless he could not even afford to have a daily newspaper delivered to Redhill, suggesting that his financial circumstances there were still tight. , A wealthy area in Kensington, that is just south of Kensington High Street. ... , Reigate is an historic market town in Surrey, England at the foot of the North Downs, and in the London commuter belt. ...


Samuel Palmer is buried, with his wife, in Reigate churchyard.


Legacy

Samuel Palmer was largely forgotten after his death. In 1909, large amounts of his Shoreham work were destroyed by his surviving son Herbert Palmer, who burnt "a great quantity of father's handiwork ... Knowing that no one would be able to make head or tail of what I burnt; I wished to save it from a more humiliating fate". The destruction "included sketchbooks, notebooks, and original works, and lasted for days". It wasn't until 1926 that Palmer's rediscovery began through a show curated by Martin Hardie at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Drawings, Etchings and Woodcuts made by Samuel Palmer and other Disciples of William Blake. But it took until the early 1950s for his reputation to really start to recover, stimulated by Geoffrey Grigson's 280-page book Samuel Palmer (1947) and later by an exhibition of the Shoreham work in 1957 and by Grigson's 1960 selection of Palmer's writing. His reputation now rests mainly on his Shoreham work, but some of his later work has recently received more appreciation. The Cromwell Road entrance to the Victoria and Albert Museum The Victoria and Albert Museum viewed from Thurloe Square The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) is on Cromwell Road in Kensington, West London. ... Geoffrey Grigson (2nd March 1905 - 1985) was an English writer. ...


The Shoreham work has had a powerful influence on many English artists since being rediscovered. Palmer was a notable influence on F.L. Griggs, Robin Tanner, William Larkins, Graham Sutherland, Paul Drury, Eric Ravilious, the glass engraving of Laurence Whistler, and Clifford Harper. He also inspired a resurgence in twentieth-century landscape printmaking, which began amongst students at Goldsmiths' College in the 1920s. (See: Jolyon Drury, 2006) Frederick Landseer Maur Griggs, RA, RE (October 30, 1876 – June 7, 1938) was a distinguished English etcher, architectural draughtsman, illustrator, and early conservationist, associated with the late flowering of the Arts and Crafts movement in the Cotswolds. ... Robin Tanner (Wiltshire, 1904-1988) was an English artist, etcher and printmaker. ... William Larkins (died 24 April 1800) was a member of the Royal Society elected 14 April 1796[1] He was formerly an accountant in Bengal for the British East India Company. ... Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... Eric Ravilious (1903 - 1942) was an English painter, book illustrator, and wood engraver. ... Alan Charles Laurence Whistler (January 21, 1912-December 19, 2000) (always referred to as Laurence Whistler) was a British poet and artist, who devoted himself to glass engraving, including some celebrated examples of stained glass. ... Cover art of Harpers 1978 Class War Comix Clifford Harper (born July 13, 1949) is an artist who describes himself as a committed anarchist and cartoonist. ...


In 2005 the British Museum collaborated with the Metropolitan Museum of Art to stage the first truly major retrospective of his work, timed to coincide with the bicentenary of Palmer's birth. The show ran from October 2005 – January 2006, and at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, March - May 2006. The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ...


Palmer's style was frequently crudely mimicked by the art forger Tom Keating. Art forgery means creating and especially selling works of art that are falsely attributed to be work of other, usually more famous artists. ... Tom Keating (March 1, 1917 - February 12, 1984) was an art restorer and famous art forger who claimed to have forged more than 2,000 paintings by over 100 different artists. ...


References

  • Lister, Raymond (1988). ''Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of Samuel Palmer. Cambridge University Press, 1988.
  • Lister, Raymond (1986). The Paintings of Samuel Palmer. Cambridge University Press, 1986.
  • Herring, Sarah (1988). "Samuel Palmer's Shoreham drawings in Indian ink: a matter of light and shade". Apollo vol. 148, no. 441 (November 1998), pp. 37-42.
  • Drury, Jolyon (2006) Revelation to Revolution: The Legacy of Samuel Palmer - The Revival and Evolution of Pastoral Printmaking by Paul Drury and the Goldsmiths School in the 20th Century.

Catalogue Raisonné is the name of a special type of book. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Samuel Palmer
  • Page at the Tate Gallery with several images of Palmer's work
  • Home page of the British Museum exhibition
  • Three late Palmer etchings from The Fine Arts Society of London

  Results from FactBites:
 
Samuel Palmer - LoveToKnow 1911 (401 words)
SAMUEL PALMER (1805-1881), English landscape painter and etcher, was born in London on the 27th of January 1805.
An illness led to a residence of seven years at Shoreham in Kent, and the characteristics of the scenery of the district are constantly recurrent in his works.
In 1861 Palmer removed to Reigate, where he died on the 24th of May 1881.
BBC - Painting the Weather - Palmer (151 words)
Palmer painted from an early age, but it was his meeting with William Blake in 1824 that intensified the spiritual “visionary” qualities of his work in which landscapes were treated as visions of paradise.
Palmer was only 14 when he first exhibited landscapes at the Royal Academy.
Palmer experimented with all kinds of materials in his paintings including soot and flour.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m