FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Samuel F. B. Morse
Samuel F. B. Morse

Samuel Morse
Born April 27, 1791(1791-04-27)
Charlestown, Massachusetts
Died April 2, 1872 (aged 80)
5 West 22nd Street, New York City, New York
Occupation Writer, Painter, and Inventor

Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791April 2, 1872) was an American painter of portraits and historic scenes, the creator of a single wire telegraph system, and co-inventor, with Alfred Vail, of the Morse Code.[1] PD image from http://www. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... The creator god is the divine being that created the universe, according to various traditions and faiths. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... Alfred Lewis Vail (September 25, 1807 - January 18, 1859) was a machinist and inventor. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ...

Contents

Birth and education

kathleen was here


Painting

The Chapel of the Virgin at Subiaco
The Chapel of the Virgin at Subiaco

Morse's Calvinist beliefs are evident in his painting the Landing of the Pilgrims, through the depiction of simplistic clothing as well as the austere facial features. This image captured the psychology of the Federalists; Calvinists from England brought to the United States ideas of religion and government thus forever linking the two countries. More importantly, this particular work attracted the attention of the famous artist, Washington Allston. Allston wanted Morse to come with him to England to meet the famous British artist Benjamin West. An agreement for three year stay was made with Jedidah and young Morse set sail with Allston aboard the Lydia on July 15, 1811 (1). Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 752 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2024 × 1614 pixel, file size: 355 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 752 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2024 × 1614 pixel, file size: 355 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


Upon his arrival in England, Morse diligently worked on perfecting painting techniques under the careful eye of Allston and by the end of 1811; he gained admittance to the Royal Academy. At the Academy, he fell in love with the Neo-classical art work of the Renaissance paying close attention to Michelangelo and Raphael. After observing and practicing sketches of curvatures and muscle formations, the young artist successfully created his own masterpiece, Dying Hercules. Immediately, Benjamin West secured Morse’s position at the Academy and received a gold medal from the Adelphi Society(2).


There definitely was a political statement against the British but also American Federalists with Dying Hercules. The muscles represented the strength of the young and vibrant United States that was undermined by the dubious the British and their American supporters. During Morse’s time in Britain the Americans and English were engaged in the War of 1812 and division existed within United States society over loyalties. Anti-Federalists Americans aligned themselves with the French, abhorred the British, and believed a strong central government to be inherently dangerous to democracy.(3) As the war raged on his letters to his parents became more anti-Federalist in their tones. In one such letter Morse said, "I assert that the Federalists in the Northern States have done more injury to their country by their violent opposition measures than a French alliance could. There proceedings are copied into the English papers, read before Parliament, and circulated through their country, and what do they say of them… they call them (Federalists) cowards, a base set, say they are traitors to their country and ought to be hanged like traitors.

Morse in his youth.
Morse in his youth.

Although Jedidah did not change his political views, he did influence Morse’s in another way. It unmistakably clear that Jedidah’s Calvinist ideas were and integral part of Morse’s other significant English piece Judgment of Jupiter. Download high resolution version (401x620, 16 KB)Samuel F. B. Morse - Project Gutenberg eText 15161. ... Download high resolution version (401x620, 16 KB)Samuel F. B. Morse - Project Gutenberg eText 15161. ...


Jupiter in the cloud, accompanied by his eagle, with his hand over the parties, is pronouncing judgment. Marpessa with an expression of compunction and shame, imploring forgiveness, is throwing herself into the arms of her husband. Idas, who tenderly loved Marpessa, is eagerly rushing forward to receive her, while Apollo stares with surprise… at the unexpectedness of her decision (5). A case can be made that Jupiter is representative of God’s omnipotence watching every move that is made. One might deem the portrait as a moral teaching by Morse on infidelity. Although Marpessa fell victim she realized that her eternal salvation was important and desisted from her wicked ways. Apollo shows no remorse for what he did, but just stands there with a puzzled look. A lot of the American paintings throughout the early nineteenth century had religious themes and tones and it was Morse who was the forerunner. Judgment of Jupiter allowed Morse to express his support of Anti Federalism while maintaining his strong spiritual convictions. This work represented American nationalism through Calvinism because these individuals expelled from England, contributed to the expulsion of the English (1776 and now in 1812) and established a free democratic society. West sought to present this image at another Royal Academy exhibition; unfortunately his time had run out. He left England on August 21, 1815 and began his full time career as an American painter (6).


The years, 1815-1825, mark significant growth in Morse’s paintings as he sought to capture the true essence of America’s culture and life. He had the honor of painting former Federalist President John Adams (1816). He hoped to become part of grander projects and saw his opportunity with the clash between Federalist and Anti-Federalists over Dartmouth College. Morse was able to paint Judge Woodward (1817) who was involved in bringing the Dartmouth case before the Supreme Court and the college’s president, Francis Brown. He sought commissions in Charleston, South Carolina (1818). Morse’s painting of Mrs. Emma Quash symbolized the opulence of Charleston. It seemed for the time being, the young artist was doing well for himself (7).


Between 1819 and 1821, Morse experienced a great change in his' life. Commissions ceased in Charleston when the city was hit with an economic recession. Jedidah was forced to resign from his ministerial position as he was unsuccessful in stopping the rift within Calvinism. The new branch that formed was the Congregational Unitarians which he deemed as detestable anti-Federalists because these persons took a different approach over salvation. Although he respected his father’s religious opinions, he sympathized with the Unitarians. A prominent family that converted to the new Calvinist faith was the Pickerings of Portsmouth whom Morse had painted. This portrait can then be viewed as a further shift towards anti-Federalism. A person could argue that he made his full transition to anti- Federalism when he was commissioned to paint President James Monroe (1820). Monroe embodied Jeffersonian Democracy by favoring the common man over the aristocrat; later reemphasized upon the ascension of Andrew Jackson (8).

Mrs. Daniel de Saussure Bacot, an example of Morse's portraiture
Mrs. Daniel de Saussure Bacot, an example of Morse's portraiture

There were two defining commissions that shaped Morse’s art career from his return to New Haven until the establishment of the National Academy of Design. The Hall of Congress (1821) and the Marquis de Lafayette (1825) embroiled Morse’s sense of democratic nationalism. The artist chose to paint the House of Representatives, to show American democracy in action. He traveled to Washington D.C. to draw the architecture of the new halls, carefully placing eighty individuals within the painting and believed that a night scene was appropriate. He successfully balanced the architecture of the Rotunda with the figurines and the glow of the lamplight serving as the focal point of the work. Pairs of people, those who stood alone, individuals bent over their desks working were painted simply but had characterized faces. Morse chose nighttime to convey Congress’ dedication to the principles of democracy transcended day. The Hall of Congress however, failed to draw a crowd in New York City. One possible reason for the disappointment was the shadow of John Trumbull’s Declaration of Independence that won popular acclaim in 1820. Perhaps some individuals did not appreciate the inner-workings of the American government (9). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 492 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (734 × 895 pixel, file size: 55 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 492 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (734 × 895 pixel, file size: 55 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Portrait (disambiguation). ...


Morse felt a great degree of honor of painting the Marquis de Lafayette,leading supporter of the American Revolution.He felt compelled to paint a grandiose portrait of the man who helped to establish a free and independent America. In his image, he enshrouds Lafayette with a magnificent sunset as he stands to the right of three pedestals of which two are Benjamin Franklin and George Washington with the final reserved for him. A peaceful wooden landscape below him symbolized American tranquility and prosperity as it approach the age of fifty. The developing friendship between Morse and Lafayette and the discussion of the Revolutionary War, affected the artist upon returning to New York City (10).


Morse was in Europe for three years improving his painting skills, 1830-1832, travelling in Italy, Switzerland and France. The project he eventually selected was to paint miniature copies of some 38 of the Louvre's famous paintings on a single canvas (6 ft. x 9 ft) which he entitled "The Gallery of the Louvre". He planned to complete "The Gallery of the Louvre" when he returned home to Massachusetts and to earn an income by exhibiting his work and charging admission. This was typical of Morse who stumbled haphazardly from one money-making scheme to another in those days.[citation needed] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... This article is about the museum. ... The Mona Lisa is perhaps the best-known artistic painting in the Western world. ... Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gallery may refer to: Actress Gallery Art gallery Gallery Project, an open-source package for creating and managing image galleries on web sites Gallery (band), a 1970s musical group headed by Jim Gold who are famous for their 1972 song (Its So) Nice To Be With You. ... This article is about the museum. ... This article is about the museum. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Telegraph

Original Samuel Morse telegraph
Original Samuel Morse telegraph

On the sea voyage home in 1832 Morse encountered Charles Thomas Jackson of Boston who was well schooled in electromagnetism. Witnessing various experiments with Jackson's electromagnet, Morse developed the concept of a single wire telegraph, and "The Gallery of the Louvre" was set aside. He was devising his[citation needed] telegraph code even before the ship docked.1 In time the Morse code would become the primary language of telegraphy in the world. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1308 × 1988 pixels, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1308 × 1988 pixels, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Charles Thomas Jackson (21 June 1805 - 28 August 1880) was an American physician and scientist who was active in medicine, chemistry, mineralogy, and geology. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by the flow of an electric current. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... Gallery may refer to: Actress Gallery Art gallery Gallery Project, an open-source package for creating and managing image galleries on web sites Gallery (band), a 1970s musical group headed by Jim Gold who are famous for their 1972 song (Its So) Nice To Be With You. ... This article is about the museum. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ...


In 1836 Morse ran unsuccessfully for mayor of New York under the Nativist banner, gathering only 1496 votes. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial...


William Cooke and Professor Charles Wheatstone reached the stage of launching a commercial telegraph prior to Morse, despite starting later. In England Cooke became fascinated by electrical telegraph in 1836, four years after Morse, but with greater financial resources. Cooke abandoned his primary subject of anatomy and built a small electrical telegraph within three weeks. Wheatstone also was experimenting with telegraphy and (most importantly) understood that a single large battery would not carry a telegraphic signal over long distances, and that numerous small batteries were far more successful and efficient in this task (Wheatstone was building on the primary research of Joseph Henry, an American physicist). Cooke and Wheatstone formed a partnership and patented the electrical telegraph in May 1837, and within a short time had provided the Great Western Railway with a 13-mile (21 km) stretch of telegraph. However, Cooke and Wheatstone's multiple wire signaling method would be overtaken by Morse's superior code within a few years. William Fothergill Cooke (Ealing 1806- Farnham, Surrey 25 June 1879) was, with Charles Wheatstone, the co-inventor of the Cooke-Wheatstone electrical telegraph, which was patented in May 1837. ... Charles Wheatstone Sir Charles Wheatstone (February 6, 1802 - October 19, 1875) was the British inventor of many innovations including the English concertina the Stereoscope an early form of microphone the Playfair cipher (named for Lord Playfair, the person who publicized it) He was a major figure in the development of... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The electrical telegraph is a telegraph that uses electric signals. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The electrical telegraph is a telegraph that uses electric signals. ... Telegraph and Telegram redirect here. ... A battery is of one or more electrochemical cells, which store chemical energy and make it available in an electrical form. ... Joseph Henry Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was a Scottish-American scientist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. ... The electrical telegraph is a telegraph that uses electric signals. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ...


Morse encountered the problem of getting a telegraphic signal to carry over more than a few hundred yards of wire. His breakthrough came from the insights of Professor Leonard Gale, who taught chemistry at New York University (a personal friend of Joseph Henry). With Gale's help, Morse soon was able to send a message through ten miles (16 km) of wire. This was the great breakthrough Morse had been seeking. New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Joseph Henry Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was a Scottish-American scientist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. ...


Morse and Gale were soon joined by a young enthusiastic man, Alfred Vail, who had excellent skills, insights and money. Morse's telegraph now began to be developed very rapidly. Alfred Lewis Vail (September 25, 1807 - January 18, 1859) was a machinist and inventor. ...


In 1838 a trip to Washington, D.C. failed to attract federal sponsorship for a telegraph line. Morse then traveled to Europe seeking both sponsorship and patents, but in London discovered Cooke and Wheatstone had already established priority. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Priority can refer to in telecommunications, the right to occupy a specific frequency for authorized uses, free of harmful interference from stations of other agencies a synonym of priority level in DOD record communications systems, one of the four levels of precedence used to establish the time frame for handling...


In 1839, from Paris, Morse published the first American description of daguerreotype photography by Louis Daguerre. This article is about the capital of France. ... An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ... Louis Daguerre Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (November 18, 1787 – July 10, 1851) was the French artist and chemist who is recognized for his invention of the Daguerreotype process of photography. ...


Morse made one last trip to Washington, D.C., in December 1842, stringing "wires between two committee rooms in the Capitol, and sent messages back and forth -- and, for some reason, this time some people believed him, and a bill was finally proposed allocating $30,000 towards building an experimental line".³


The general public was highly skeptical, and there were also a great many skeptics in Congress. A thirty eight-mile (61km) line was constructed between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore. The most convincing demonstration was when the results of the Whig National Convention at Baltimore in the spring of 1844 reached Washington via telegraph prior to the arrival of the first train. On 24 May 1844 the line (which ran along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad between the Capitol and Baltimore) was officially opened as Morse sent his famous words "What hath God wrought" along the wire. Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) was one of the oldest railroads in the United States, with an original line from the port of Baltimore, Maryland, west to the Ohio River at Wheeling and Parkersburg, West Virginia. ...


In May 1845 the Magnetic Telegraph Company was formed in order to radiate telegraph lines from New York City towards Philadelphia, Boston, Buffalo, New York and the Mississippi.4 New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ...


Morse also at one time adopted Wheatstone and Carl August von Steinheil's idea of broadcasting an electrical telegraph signal through a body of water or down steel railroad tracks or anything conductive. He went to great lengths to win a lawsuit for the right to be called "inventor of the telegraph", and promoted himself as being an inventor, but Alfred played an important role in the invention of the Morse Code, which was based on earlier codes for the electromagnetic telegraph. Carl August von Steinheil Carl August von Steinheil (12 October 1801 in Rappoltsweiler, Elsass (German-populated France); 14 September 1870 in München) was a German physicist. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ...


Samuel Morse received a patent for the telegraph in 1847, at the old Beylerbeyi Palace (the present Beylerbeyi Palace was built in 1861-1865 on the same location) in Istanbul, which was issued by Sultan Abdülmecid who personally tested the new invention[2] 5 Beylerbeyi Palace by the Bosphorus Bridge The Beylerbeyi Palace (Turkish: ) is a palace located in Beylerbeyi neighbourhood of Istanbul, Turkey at the Asian side of the Bosphorus, situated just north of the Bosphorus Bridge today. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Abdülmecid I (Ottoman Turkish: عبد المجيد اول ‘Abdü’l-MecÄ«d-i evvel) (April 23, 1823 – June 25, 1861) was the 31st sultan of the Ottoman Empire and succeeded his father Mahmud II on July 2, 1839. ...


In the 1850s, Morse went to Copenhagen and visited the Thorvaldsens Museum, where the sculptor's grave is in the inner courtyard. He was received by King Frederick VII, who decorated him with the Order of the Dannebrog. Morse expressed his wish to donate his portrait from 1830 to the king. The Thorvaldsen portrait today belongs to Margaret II of Denmark. For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... A court or courtyard is an enclosed area, often a space enclosed by a building that is open to the sky. ... King Frederick VII Frederick VII (October 6, 1808 - November 15, 1863) was the last king of Denmark to rule as an absolute monarch. ... The Order of the Dannebrog is an Order of Denmark, instituted in 1671. ... Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II (Margrethe Alexandrine Þorhildur Ingrid), styled HM The Queen (born April 16, 1940), is the Queen regnant and head of state of Denmark. ...


The Morse telegraphic apparatus was officially adopted as the standard for European telegraphy in 1851. Britain (with its British Empire) remained the only notable part of the world where other forms of electrical telegraph were in widespread use (they continued to use the needle telegraph invention of Cooke and Wheatstone).[3] The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The electrical telegraph is a telegraph that uses electric signals. ...


Later years

Portrait of Samuel F. B. Morse by Mathew Brady, between 1855 and 1865
Portrait of Samuel F. B. Morse by Mathew Brady, between 1855 and 1865

In the United States, Morse had now had his patent for many years, but it was being both ignored and contested. In 1853 the case of the patent came before the Supreme Court where, after very lengthy investigation, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney ruled that Morse had been the first to combine the battery, electromagnetism, the electromagnet and the correct battery configuration into a workable practical telegraph.6 Nevertheless, in spite of this clear ruling, Morse still received no official recognition from the United States government. Assisted by the American Ambassador in Paris, the governments of Europe were approached regarding how they had long neglected Morse while using his invention. There was then a widespread recognition that something must be done, and "in 1858 Morse was awarded the sum of 400,000 French francs (equivalent to about $80,000 at the time) by the governments of France, Austria, Belgium, the Netherlands, Piedmont, Russia, Sweden, Tuscany and Turkey, each of which contributed a share according to the number of Morse instruments in use in each country."7 Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 610 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Samuel F. B. Morse Categories: U.S. history images ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 610 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Samuel F. B. Morse Categories: U.S. history images ... Mathew B. Brady, circa 1875 For other persons named Matthew Brady, see Matthew Brady (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, from 1836 until his death in 1864, and the first Roman Catholic to hold that office. ... A battery is of one or more electrochemical cells, which store chemical energy and make it available in an electrical form. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by the flow of an electric current. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ...


There was still no such recognition in the USA. This remained the case until 10 June 1871, when a bronze statue of Samuel Morse was unveiled in Central Park, New York City. is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


In the 1850s, Morse became well known as a defender of America's institution of slavery, considering it to be divinely sanctioned. In his treatise "An Argument on the Ethical Position of Slavery," he wrote: Slave redirects here. ...

My creed on the subject of slavery is short. Slavery per se is not sin. It is a social condition ordained from the beginning of the world for the wisest purposes, benevolent and disciplinary, by Divine Wisdom. The mere holding of slaves, therefore, is a condition having per se nothing of moral character in it, any more than the being a parent, or employer, or ruler.[4]

Samuel Morse was a generous man who gave large sums to charity. He also became interested in the relationship of science and religion and provided the funds to establish a lectureship on 'the relation of the Bible to the Sciences'.9 Morse was not a selfish man. Other people and corporations made millions using his inventions, yet most rarely paid him for the use of his patented telegraph. He was not bitter about this, though he would have appreciated more rewards for his labors. Morse was comfortable; by the time of his death, his estate was valued at some $500,000.


Marriages

Morse married Lucretia Pickering Walker on 29 September 1819, in Concord, New Hampshire. She died on 7 February 1825, shortly after the birth of their third child. His second wife was Sarah Elizabeth Griswold. They were married on 10 August 1848 in Utica, New York. is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... Location in Merrimack County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack County Incorporated 1733  - City Manager Thomas J. Aspell, Jr. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Utica, New York is a city in the state of New York, and the county seat of Oneida County. ...


Death

Morse died on 2 April 1872 at his home at 5 West 22nd Street, New York City, at the age of 80, and was buried in the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. [5] is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York, now in Brooklyn. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ...


Patents

  • U.S. Patent 6,420  Telegraph, May 1, 1849

Trivia

  • Morse invented a marble-cutting machine that could carve three dimensional sculptures in marble or stone. Morse couldn't patent it, however, because of an existing 1820 Thomas Blanchard design.
  • New York University's core curriculum and list of requirements is known as the Morse Academic Plan (MAP).
  • A letter to a friend describing the challenge of defending his patent on the electromagnetic telegraph, although he had no part in its invention since his friend Alfred Vail imported this invention by Carl Friedrich Gauss from Europe, and Morse is even suspected to have received the Morse Code from Vail.[1] (1848).[2]
I have been so constantly under the necessity of watching the movements of the most unprincipled set of pirates I have ever known, that all my time has been occupied in defense, in putting evidence into something like legal shape that I am the inventor of the Electro-Magnetic Telegraph!! Would you have believed it ten years ago that a question could be raised on that subject?
  • There is a blue plaque commemorating him at 141 Cleveland Street, London, where he lived from 1812 to 15.
Statue of Samuel F. B. Morse by Byron M. Picket, New York's Central Park, dedicated 1871
Statue of Samuel F. B. Morse by Byron M. Picket, New York's Central Park, dedicated 1871

This article is about devices that perform tasks. ... 2-dimensional renderings (ie. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Thomas Blanchard (1788–1864) was a prolific American inventor, awarded over twenty-five patents for his creations. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Telegraph and Telegram redirect here. ... Alfred Lewis Vail (September 25, 1807 - January 18, 1859) was a machinist and inventor. ... Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss (pronounced ,  ; in German usually Gauß, Latin: ) (30 April 1777 – 23 February 1855) was a German mathematician and scientist who contributed significantly to many fields, including number theory, statistics, analysis, differential geometry, geodesy, electrostatics, astronomy, and optics. ... Patent pirate may refer to different behaviors depending on the context: someone who willfully infringes a patent , see patent infringement [1] [2] [3] a patent troll [4] someone who makes use of submarine patents [5] [6] References ^ Microsoft Was Found To Be A Patent Pirate, in ZDNet News Discussion, April... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... Image File history File links Statue of Samuel Finley Breese Morse in New Yorks Central Park, East 72nd St. ... Image File history File links Statue of Samuel Finley Breese Morse in New Yorks Central Park, East 72nd St. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ Morse, Edward Lind. "Defends His Father's Claim to Paternity of the Telegraph.", New York Times, June 21, 1904, Tuesday. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. "My attention has been called to a communication in The New York Times of June 7 headed "Vail, Father of the Telegraph," and signed Stephen Vail. While I have no desire to enter into a newspaper controversy with Mr. Vail, and while I am sure that you have no desire to encourage one, I trust in justice to my father, Samuel F.B. Morse, you will allow me a few words in reply." 
  2. ^ Istanbul City Guide: Beylerbeyi Palace
  3. ^ "Franklin and his Electric Kite-Prosecution and Progress of Electrical researches--Historical Sketch of the Electric Telegraph--Claims of Morse and others--Uses of Electricity--Telegraphic Statistics.", New York Times, November 11, 1852, Wednesday. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. "It was in the month of June, 1752, a century ago, that Franklin made his celebrated experiment with the Electric Kite, by means of which he demonstrated the identity of electricity and lightning." 
  4. ^ From An Argument on the Ethical Position of Slavery in the social system, and its relation to the politics of the day (New York, Papers from the Society for the Diffusion of Political Knowledge, no. 12, 1863) in Slavery Pamphlets # 60, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript library, Yale University. Quoted in "Yale, Slavery, & Abolition," an online report on Yale honorees, at http://www.yaleslavery.org/WhoYaleHonors/morse.htm
  5. ^ "Prof. Samuel Finley Breese Morse.", New York Times, April 3, 1872, Wednesday. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. "Prof. Morse died last evening at 8 o'clock, his condition having become very low soon after surprise. Though expected, the death of this distinguished man will be received with regret by thousands to whom he was only known by fame." 
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Samuel F. B. Morse

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Further reading

  • Reinhardt, Joachim, "Samuel F. B. Morse (1791-1872) Congo, 1988".
  • Mabee, Carleton, The American Leonardo: A Life of Samuel F. B. Morse (Knopf, 1944) (Pulitzer Prize winner for biography for 1944]
  • Samuel F. B. Morse, Foreign Conspiracy Against the Liberties of the United States: The Numbers Under the Signature (Harvard University Press 1835,1855)
  • Kenneth Silverman, Lightning Man - The Accursed Life of Samuel F.B. Morse (De Capo Press 2004)
  • Paul J. Staiti, Samuel F. B. Morse (Cambridge 1989).
  • Lauretta Dimmick, Mythic Proportion: Bertel Thorvaldsen's Influence in America, Thorvaldsen: l'ambiente, l'influsso, il mito, ed. P. Kragelund and M. Nykjær, Rome 1991 (Analecta Romana Instituti Danici, Supplementum 18.), pp. 169-191.
  • Tom Standage, The Victorian Internet, (London:Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1998) pp. 21-40.
  • Prime, Life of S. F. B. Morse (New York, 1875)
  • E. L. Morse (editor), his son, Samuel Finley Breese Morse, his Letters and Journals' (two volumes, Boston, 1914)

Alfred A. Knopf ( September 12, 1892 – August 11, 1984) was a leading American publisher of the 20th century. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Life and Times of Cotton Mather, by Kenneth Silverman. ... Samuel Irenæus Prime (1812-85) was an American clergyman, traveler, and writer. ...

See also

  • List of coupled cousins

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.zp:Samuel Morse // This is a list of prominent individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a cousin, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m