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Encyclopedia > Samuel Cooper (general)
General Samuel Cooper

Samuel Cooper (June 12, 1798December 3, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and, although little-known today, the highest ranking Confederate general during the American Civil War. Image File history File links Samuel_Cooper_(general). ... Image File history File links Samuel_Cooper_(general). ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the...


Cooper was born in Hackensack, New York. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at age 15 and graduated in two years (the customary period of study in that period) in 1815. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Light Artillery. In 1827, he married Sarah Maria Mason and became the brother-in-law of future Confederate diplomat James M. Mason and later the father-in-law of Union General Frank Wheaton. Sarah's sister, Ann Maria Mason, was the mother of Confederate cavalry general Fitzhugh Lee, the nephew of Robert E. Lee. Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... James Murray Mason (November 3, 1798 - April 28, 1871) was a United States Representative and United States Senator from Virginia. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Major-General Frank Wheaton (8 May 1833- 18 June 1903) was a United States Cavalry officer, who was commisioned (as a 1st Lieutenant) in 1855. ... Fitzhugh Lee in the Civil War Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War. ... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ...


Cooper served in a number of artillery units until 1837, when he was appointed chief clerk of the U.S. War Department. In 1838 he received a brevet promotion to major and was appointed Assistant Adjutant General of the Army. Nine years later, with a brevet as lieutenant colonel, he served in the same capacity. His service in the Seminole War of 184142 was a rare departure for him from Washington, D.C. He received a brevet promotion to colonel for his War Department service in the Mexican-American War and was promoted to the permanent rank of colonel in the Regular Army and Adjutant General on July 15, 1852. 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Department of War was the military department of the United States governments executive branch from 1789 until 1949, when it became part of the United States Department of Defense. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the US military, brevet refers to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Major is a military rank. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ... take you to calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Washington, D.C. is the capital city of the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that polkovnik be merged into this article or section. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Strength 60,000 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 (Mexican government estimate) The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... The Regular Army is the name given to the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


At the outbreak of the Civil War, Cooper's loyalties were with the South. His wife's family was from Virginia and he had a close friendship with Jefferson Davis, who had been Secretary of War. He resigned his commission on March 7, 1861, and traveled to Montgomery, Alabama, to join the Confederate States Army. He was immediately given a commission as a brigadier general and served as the Adjutant General and Inspector General of the Confederate Army, a post he held until the end of the war. As of May 16, 1861, he was promoted to full general in the Confederate Army, one of five men promoted at that time, and one of only eight men in the war, but with the earliest date of rank. Thus, despite his relative obscurity today, he outranked such luminaries as Albert Sidney Johnston, Robert E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard. He reported directly to President Jefferson Davis. Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Montgomery is the capital of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ...


Cooper's last official act in office was to preserve the official records of the Confederate Army and turn them over to the United States government, where they form a part of the Official Records, The War of the Rebellion: a Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published starting in 1880. The Official Records of the American Civil War or often more simply the Official Records or ORs, constitute a unique, authentic, and comprehensive collection of first-hand accounts, orders, reports, and correspondence drawn from War and Navy Department records of both Confederate and Union governments during the American Civil War. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


After the war, Cooper was a farmer at his home, "Cameron", near Alexandria, Virginia. The house had been taken over by the U.S. government during the war and turned into a fort, but he was able to move into what had been an overseer's house. He died at his home near Alexandria and is buried there in Christ Church Cemetery. Old Town Alexandria, viewed from the west, as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ...


References

  • Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J.: Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.

External links

  • Online biography
  • Find-A-Grave profile for Samuel Cooper

  Results from FactBites:
 
Samuel Cooper (general) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (542 words)
Cooper served in a number of artillery units until 1837, when he was appointed chief clerk of the U.S. War Department.
He was immediately given a commission as a brigadier general and served as the Adjutant General and Inspector General of the Confederate Army, a post he held until the end of the war.
Cooper's last official act in office was to preserve the official records of the Confederate Army and turn them over to the United States government, where they form a part of the Official Records, The War of the Rebellion: a Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published starting in 1880.
Samuel Cooper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (405 words)
Samuel Cooper (1609 – May 5, 1672) was an English miniature painter, and younger brother of Alexander Cooper.
Samuel Pepys, who makes many references to him, tells us he was an excellent musician, playing well upon the lute, and also a good linguist, speaking French with ease.
He is known to have painted also the portrait of John Aubrey, which was presented in 1601 to the Ashmolean Museum, as wo learn from his correspondence with John Ray, the naturalist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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